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I am trying to capture the RSSI value of a device when there is an association request. I have written a C program that has captured MAC address of the device and the router. I figured out how to get the MAC addresses by just printing out hex values of the packet and searching for a sequence of hex values that correspond the MAC address. The MAC address of the connecting device starts at

packet+58;

The MAC address of the router starts at

packet+64;

Unfortunately this bad printing method would not work for RSSI values as I wouldn't be able to search for a sequence of hex numbers for the RSSI value.

I hope this question makes sense. Thank you for your help.

  • Understand that RSSI is arbitrarily defined by a particular vendor, and you can't compare it with other models, or, sometimes, with the same model which has a different software version. There is no standard that defines what RSSI is, so it can't really be used for comparison. – Ron Maupin Mar 24 '18 at 13:31
  • Thank you for the reply. Is there any way of getting the rssi value at all? – Conor Mar 24 '18 at 13:59
  • I am trying to implement this code to work for my needs github.com/weaknetlabs/libpcap-80211-c/blob/master/802sniff.c. Here they get the rssi value in a similar way by getting the value of what is in position packet+22. Sorry I am new to the C programming language but I am a strong enough programmer in Java and Python – Conor Mar 24 '18 at 15:17
  • My comment is about the usefulness of RSSI, which is pretty minimal since it cannot be compared between different devices. – Ron Maupin Mar 24 '18 at 15:27
  • That's no problem sorry. I managed to find out how to get it in the most awkward way possible. I first write my tcpdump capture to a file, I then read this file to see what the value of the RSSI is. I then do the 256-the RSSI value. I then convert this integer in to hex, I then go and find this hex value in the packet(46th hex byte). I can now use this position to store the rssi value for myself by doing rssi = (packet+46 - 256) – Conor Mar 24 '18 at 15:35

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