datetime.isoformat() returns '2018-03-24T20:25:08.698812' and datetime.isocalendar() returns '(2018, 12, 6)'
But what I need is the date and time in ISO format, but also in ISO calendar like this '2018-12-06T20:25:08.698812'
How do I get a datetime in both ISO format and ISO calendar?

d = datetime.datetime.now()
print(d.isoformat())
print(d.isocalendar())
  • isocalendar? How does that differ from isoformat()? – Stephen Rauch Mar 25 at 1:52
  • 1
    I believe because .isocalendar() gives ISO year, week number, and weekday @StephenRauch – Brad Solomon Mar 25 at 1:53
  • isoformat just takes whatever datetime you give it and formats it in ISO format, but it doesn't actually change it to the ISO calendar. And then on the other hand, isocalender does change it to the ISO calendar, but it removes the time – Frobot Mar 25 at 1:55
  • @BradSolomon yes like that – Frobot Mar 25 at 1:56
up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can construct format like:

Code:

def isocalendar_str(a_datetime):
    iso = a_datetime.isoformat()
    iso_cal = a_datetime.isocalendar()
    return "{:0>4}-{:0>2}-{:0>2}".format(*iso_cal) + iso[10:]

And if you are using Python 3.5+, you can simplify a bit with:

def isocalendar_str(a_datetime):
    iso = a_datetime.isoformat()
    iso_cal = a_datetime.isocalendar()
    return "{:0>4}-{:0>2}-{:0>2}{}".format(*iso_cal, iso[10:])

See PEP 448 for details of the new unpacking features.

Test Code:

d = dt.datetime.now()
print(d.isoformat())
print(d.isocalendar())

print(isocalendar_str(dt.datetime.now()))

Results:

2018-03-24T19:03:05.097419
(2018, 12, 6)
2018-12-06T19:03:05.097419
  • Nice one!, how about including iso[10:] into format? {:0>4}-{:0>2}-{:0>2}{}".format(*iso_cal,iso[10:]) – Anton vBR Mar 25 at 3:09
  • 1
    @AntonvBR, I started there, but that made it PY3 specific, for a pretty minor gain. I will update answer with PY3 only option. Thanks. – Stephen Rauch Mar 25 at 3:12

Here's one way to get from A to B:

>>> import datetime
... 
... d = datetime.datetime.now()
... print(d)
... print(d.isoformat())
... print(d.isocalendar())
... 
... yr, weeknum, weekday = map(str, d.isocalendar())
... weeknum = '0' + weeknum if len(weeknum) == 1 else weeknum
... weekday = '0' + weekday
... '-'.join((yr, weeknum, weekday)) + d.isoformat()[10:]
... 
2018-03-24 22:01:33.781735
2018-03-24T22:01:33.781735
(2018, 12, 6)
'2018-12-06T22:01:33.781735'

Functionally,

>>> def customiso(dt):
...     yr, weeknum, weekday = map(str, dt.isocalendar())
...     weeknum = '0' + weeknum if len(weeknum) == 1 else weeknum
...     weekday = '0' + weekday
...     return '-'.join((yr, weeknum, weekday)) + dt.isoformat()[10:]
... 

>>> customiso(d)
'2018-12-06T22:01:33.781735'
  • I was thinking there was some datetime function already built for this but I guess maybe not. Both of you had very quick and great answers! not even sure what to accept actually. thanks! – Frobot Mar 25 at 2:11
  • You should accept @StephenRauch's in my opinion. str formatting in his answer is more efficient than what I have here, I think. – Brad Solomon Mar 25 at 2:12
  • But I wouldn't rule out there being some built-in route. I don't know ISO beyond surface level @Frobot – Brad Solomon Mar 25 at 2:12

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.