6

I have a method which takes an interface type and evaluates what the type is and from that I need to return a type related to it. But I'm not sure how to make the type returns flexible for it. I tried something like this:

public static T GridPosition <T>(IReSizeableGrid gridData) {
  if (gridData is Hex) {
    var hexGrid = (HexGrid) gridData;
    return HexLibrary.WorldToHex(WorldPoint(Input.mousePosition, GroundPlane), hexGrid);
  }
  if (gridData is QuadGrid) {
    var quadGrid = (QuadGrid) gridData;
    return Grid.Get(WorldPoint(Input.mousePosition, GroundPlane), quadGrid);
  }
  throw new Exception("Wrong type passed to GridPosition: " + gridData.GetType());
}

But I get this error:

Cannot implicitly convert type Hex to T

Am I on the right lines here using T? Trying to understand how to use it properly.

  • Possible duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/9808035/… – Songtham T. Mar 27 '18 at 2:12
  • 1
    Hmm the answer in that link seems to suggest its not a good idea to do it that way. Does that mean my design might be wrong/bad ? – WDUK Mar 27 '18 at 2:13
  • That question is different from yours, so the recommendations can be different. It seems that Hex and QuadGrid implement IReSizeableGrid, right? If yes, then why do you use generics for the returned type? You could simply return IReSizeableGrid. – Racil Hilan Mar 27 '18 at 2:32
  • @RacilHilan was trying to avoid the user utilising my library from having to cast it themselves. I'd like it to just work without them worrying about it. – WDUK Mar 27 '18 at 2:48
  • I see. Then it is not necessarily bad to use a generic function. It's hard to tell without seeing how it is used and what those sub-functions do. In general, it is recommended that each function does one job only. See my answer for how to do it if you want to continue with a generic function. – Racil Hilan Mar 27 '18 at 3:10
7

Sometimes generics aren't the right answer. You'd only use generics if you want to do the same thing to two or more related types. In this case, you are doing completely different things, so you actually need to use method overloading instead.

public static Point GridPosition(HexGrid gridData)
{
    return HexLibrary.WorldToHex( WorldPoint( Input.mousePosition, GroundPlane), gridData);
}

public static Point GridPosition(QuadGrid gridData)
{
    return Grid.Get(WorldPoint(Input.mousePosition, GroundPlane), gridData);
}

You can call either of these with the same code:

var result = GridPosition(new HexGrid());
var result = GridPosition(new QuadGrid());

...and the compiler will pick the right version for you.

  • Oh i see, thank you :) I shall take a read into overloading. Seems my google skills lead me down the wrong path. – WDUK Mar 27 '18 at 2:20
0

Since Hex and QuadGrid implement IReSizeableGrid, you can make the type of the gridData parameter also T, and then restrict T to IReSizeableGrid:

public static T GridPosition<T>(T gridData) where T : IReSizeableGrid {
    if (gridData is Hex) {
        var hexGrid = (HexGrid) gridData;
        return (T)HexLibrary.WorldToHex(WorldPoint(Input.mousePosition, GroundPlane), hexGrid);
    }
    if (gridData is QuadGrid) {
        var quadGrid = (QuadGrid)gridData;
        return (T)Grid.Get(WorldPoint(Input.mousePosition, GroundPlane), quadGrid);
    }
    throw new Exception("Wrong type passed to GridPosition: "+gridData.GetType());
}

You don't need to specify the type <T> when calling the function. It will be taken from the type of the gridData parameter.

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