95

I want to use a collection initializer for the next bit of code:

public Dictionary<int, string> GetNames()
{
    Dictionary<int, string> names = new Dictionary<int, string>();
    names.Add(1, "Adam");
    names.Add(2, "Bart");
    names.Add(3, "Charlie");
    return names;
}

So typically it should be something like:

return new Dictionary<int, string>
{ 
   1, "Adam",
   2, "Bart"
   ...

But what is the correct syntax for this?

3

7 Answers 7

158
var names = new Dictionary<int, string> {
  { 1, "Adam" },
  { 2, "Bart" },
  { 3, "Charlie" }
};
8
  • 1
    When does the initializer work? Is it only for Dictionary<TKey, TValue> subclasses or will also work on ICollection<KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue>>? Commented Dec 17, 2012 at 21:48
  • after C# 3.0 you can use var instead of the declaring type, or if leaving the declaring type can omit the new Dictio... -- stackoverflow.com/questions/5678216/…
    – drzaus
    Commented Jan 13, 2014 at 20:24
  • 1
    @drzaus: Using var is an ugly, ugly practice though; C# is a strongly typed language.
    – Nyerguds
    Commented Feb 24, 2014 at 11:24
  • 1
    @Nyerguds: what? var literally just saves you keystrokes, it's implicitly strongly typed.
    – drzaus
    Commented Feb 24, 2014 at 18:24
  • 5
    @Nyerguds -- you're entitled to your opinion, I guess, but if you're immediately initializing your variables there is literally no difference between using var and repeating yourself with SomeType obj = new SomeType.... And since you can't declare var obj; without immediately initializing, I just don't see the problem. Really, I'm trying to learn, but I can't grok your position.
    – drzaus
    Commented Apr 1, 2014 at 21:46
37

The syntax is slightly different:

Dictionary<int, string> names = new Dictionary<int, string>()
{
    { 1, "Adam" },
    { 2, "Bart" }
}

Note that you're effectively adding tuples of values.

As a sidenote: collection initializers contain arguments which are basically arguments to whatever Add() function that comes in handy with respect to compile-time type of argument. That is, if I have a collection:

class FooCollection : IEnumerable
{
    public void Add(int i) ...

    public void Add(string s) ...

    public void Add(double d) ...
}

the following code is perfectly legal:

var foos = new FooCollection() { 1, 2, 3.14, "Hello, world!" };
5
  • Great answer, I didn't know about that! Anyway, when does the dictionary initializer work? Is it only for Dictionary<TKey, TValue> subclasses or will also work on ICollection<KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue>>? Commented Dec 17, 2012 at 21:49
  • 1
    @Shimmy Collection initializers work on anything that implements IEnumerable and has Add() methods. Commented Dec 18, 2012 at 6:20
  • @Shimmy: dictionaries are collections Commented Dec 22, 2012 at 5:39
  • @JohnSaunders But a dictionary initializer accepts two parameters for Add. Commented Dec 22, 2012 at 21:28
  • 3
    @Shimmy: why does that matter? The point is that it will work with any class that implements IEnumerable<T> and which has an Add method. If the Add method takes 3 parameters, then you'll need 3 objects in the brackets. Commented Dec 22, 2012 at 23:00
11
return new Dictionary<int, string>
{ 
   { 1, "Adam" },
   { 2, "Bart" },
   ...
11

The question is tagged c#-3.0, but for completeness I'll mention the new syntax available with C# 6 in case you are using Visual Studio 2015 (or Mono 4.0):

var dictionary = new Dictionary<int, string>
{
   [1] = "Adam",
   [2] = "Bart",
   [3] = "Charlie"
};

Note: the old syntax mentioned in other answers still works though, if you like that better. Again, for completeness, here is the old syntax:

var dictionary = new Dictionary<int, string>
{
   { 1, "Adam" },
   { 2, "Bart" },
   { 3, "Charlie" }
};

One other kind of cool thing to note is that with either syntax you can leave the last comma if you like, which makes it easier to copy/paste additional lines. For example, the following compiles just fine:

var dictionary = new Dictionary<int, string>
{
   [1] = "Adam",
   [2] = "Bart",
   [3] = "Charlie",
};
5

If you're looking for slightly less verbose syntax you can create a subclass of Dictionary<string, object> (or whatever your type is) like this :

public class DebugKeyValueDict : Dictionary<string, object>
{

}

Then just initialize like this

var debugValues = new DebugKeyValueDict
                  {
                       { "Billing Address", billingAddress }, 
                       { "CC Last 4", card.GetLast4Digits() },
                       { "Response.Success", updateResponse.Success }
                  });

Which is equivalent to

var debugValues = new Dictionary<string, object>
                  {
                       { "Billing Address", billingAddress }, 
                       { "CC Last 4", card.GetLast4Digits() },
                       { "Response.Success", updateResponse.Success }
                  });

The benefit being you get all the compile type stuff you might want such as being able to say

is DebugKeyValueDict instead of is IDictionary<string, object>

or changing the types of the key or value at a later date. If you're doing something like this within a razor cshtml page it is a lot nicer to look at.

As well as being less verbose you can of course add extra methods to this class for whatever you might want.

2
  • This is basically how a ViewDataDictionary works in MVC - stackoverflow.com/questions/607985/… Commented Dec 23, 2012 at 0:02
  • I experimented with types as 'aliases' for Dictionarys and typed arrays, presuming it would be safer, in a typed world, to use predefined types.. Turned out not to be so useful when it came to generics and linq.
    – Patrick
    Commented Jul 7, 2016 at 2:27
2

In the following code example, a Dictionary<TKey, TValue> is initialized with instances of type StudentName.

  Dictionary<int, StudentName> students = new Dictionary<int, StudentName>()
  {
      { 111, new StudentName {FirstName="Sachin", LastName="Karnik", ID=211}},
      { 112, new StudentName {FirstName="Dina", LastName="Salimzianova", ID=317}},
      { 113, new StudentName {FirstName="Andy", LastName="Ruth", ID=198}}
  };

from msdn

-3

Yes we can use collection initializer in dictionary.If we have a dictionary like this-

Dictionary<int,string> dict = new Dictionary<int,string>();  
            dict.Add(1,"Mohan");  
            dict.Add(2, "Kishor");  
            dict.Add(3, "Pankaj");  
            dict.Add(4, "Jeetu");

We can initialize it as follow.

Dictionary<int,string> dict = new Dictionary<int,string>  
            {  

                {1,"Mohan" },  
                {2,"Kishor" },  
                {3,"Pankaj" },  
                {4,"Jeetu" }  

            }; 
1
  • 4
    There are already 6 other answers showing how to do this. We don't need a 7th answer showing the same thing.
    – Servy
    Commented May 16, 2017 at 15:06

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