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So I was tasked with making a 2-bit adder using a breadboard, 4 switches, 3 LEDs and an Arduino. The issue is that it the adder does 2 things that conflict (at least in my code), the first is that it will only turn on one light (001) for one switch turned on, however it also needs to calculate things like 10+00, which only mean one switch will be on, making it so that (as my code states) it will end up turning on the lights corresponding to both instead of just the middle one (010), and visa versa for (001). I know for a fact that it has to do with the first bit of my if statements, here is the code:

int A0Pin = 12;
int A1Pin = 11;
int B0Pin = 10;
int B1Pin = 9;

int LED0Pin = 6;
int LED1Pin = 5;
int LED2Pin = 4;

void setup()
{
  pinMode(A0Pin, INPUT);
  pinMode(A1Pin, INPUT);
  pinMode(B0Pin, INPUT);
  pinMode(B1Pin, INPUT);

  pinMode(LED0Pin, OUTPUT);
  pinMode(LED1Pin, OUTPUT);
  pinMode(LED2Pin, OUTPUT);
}

void loop()
{
  int b1Value = digitalRead(A0Pin);
  int b2Value = digitalRead(A1Pin);
  int b3Value = digitalRead(B0Pin);
  int b4Value = digitalRead(B1Pin);

  digitalWrite(LED0Pin, LOW);
  digitalWrite(LED1Pin, LOW);
  digitalWrite(LED2Pin, LOW);

  if (b1Value == HIGH)
  {
    digitalWrite(LED0Pin,HIGH);
    digitalWrite(LED1Pin,LOW);
    digitalWrite(LED2Pin,LOW);
  }
  if (b2Value == HIGH)
  {
    digitalWrite(LED0Pin,HIGH);
    digitalWrite(LED1Pin,LOW);
    digitalWrite(LED2Pin,LOW);
  }
  if (b3Value == HIGH)
  {
    digitalWrite(LED0Pin,HIGH);
    digitalWrite(LED1Pin,LOW);
    digitalWrite(LED2Pin,LOW);
  }
  if (b4Value == HIGH)
  {
    digitalWrite(LED0Pin,HIGH);
    digitalWrite(LED1Pin,LOW);
    digitalWrite(LED2Pin,LOW);
  }
  if(b1Value == HIGH && b3Value == HIGH )
  {
    digitalWrite(LED0Pin,LOW);
    digitalWrite(LED1Pin,HIGH);
    digitalWrite(LED2Pin,LOW);
  }
  if(b2Value == HIGH && b4Value == HIGH )
  {
    digitalWrite(LED0Pin,LOW);
    digitalWrite(LED1Pin,LOW);
    digitalWrite(LED2Pin,HIGH);
  }
  if(b2Value == HIGH && b3Value == LOW && b4Value == LOW)
  {
   digitalWrite(LED0Pin,LOW);
   digitalWrite(LED1Pin,HIGH);
   digitalWrite(LED2Pin,LOW);
  }
  if(b1Value == LOW && b2Value == LOW && b4Value == HIGH)
  {
    digitalWrite(LED0Pin,LOW);
    digitalWrite(LED1Pin,HIGH);
    digitalWrite(LED2Pin,LOW);
  }
  if(b1Value == HIGH && b2Value == HIGH)
  {
    digitalWrite(LED0Pin,HIGH);
    digitalWrite(LED1Pin,HIGH);
    digitalWrite(LED2Pin,LOW);
  }
  if(b3Value == HIGH && b4Value == HIGH)
  {
    digitalWrite(LED0Pin,LOW);
    digitalWrite(LED1Pin,HIGH);
    digitalWrite(LED2Pin,LOW);
  }
  if(b1Value == HIGH && b2Value == HIGH && b4Value == HIGH)
  {
    digitalWrite(LED0Pin,LOW);
    digitalWrite(LED1Pin,LOW);
    digitalWrite(LED2Pin,HIGH);
   }
  if(b2Value == HIGH && b4Value == HIGH && b2Value == HIGH)
  {
    digitalWrite(LED0Pin,LOW);
    digitalWrite(LED1Pin,LOW);
    digitalWrite(LED2Pin,HIGH);
  }  
  if(b1Value == HIGH && b2Value == HIGH && b3Value == HIGH)
  {
    digitalWrite(LED0Pin,HIGH);
    digitalWrite(LED1Pin,LOW);
    digitalWrite(LED2Pin,HIGH);
  }
   if(b3Value == HIGH && b4Value == HIGH && b1Value == HIGH)
  {
    digitalWrite(LED0Pin,HIGH);
    digitalWrite(LED1Pin,LOW);
    digitalWrite(LED2Pin,HIGH);
  }
  if(b1Value == HIGH && b2Value == 
     HIGH && b3Value == HIGH && b4Value == HIGH)
  {
    digitalWrite(LED0Pin,LOW);
    digitalWrite(LED1Pin,HIGH);
    digitalWrite(LED2Pin,HIGH);
  }
  delay(10);
}

Please excuse the lack of optimization, (that can come after I figure out the issue with the lights), any help with optimization would also be greatly appreciated, but for now I just need help making it so that things like 01+00 don't end up being confused for only 1 switch is on, resulting in both lights being on or just one, but incorrectly. I made it on Tinkercad:

Circuit diagram:

Circuit diagram

01+01=010

01+01=010

Just the first switch on (01+00=001)

Just the first switch on (01+00=001)

Just the second switch on, but misinterpreted as 10+00=010 (or visa versa)

just the second switch on, but misinterpreted as 10+00=010 (or visa versa)

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  • Please show combinations of sample input, desired output and current output, which show what you do not like about the behaviour of your code. I think that you would enjoy using else if and reversing the order of your ifs however. Alternatively take all inputs into account for each of the ifs. – Yunnosch Mar 27 '18 at 5:26
  • Did you already learn about the bitwise operators ^ and &? – Yunnosch Mar 27 '18 at 5:28
  • @Yunnosch I have no idea what those are, it's an engineering course where comp sci isn't a pre-requisite, also I'll edit to add pictures – Professor Doctor Doctor Mar 27 '18 at 5:29
  • Hmm, comp science should be where you learn about making a half-adder from a XOR gate and an AND gate. circuitstoday.com/half-adder-and-full-adder Well, maybe not on that detail level. – Yunnosch Mar 27 '18 at 5:33
  • 1
    I do assume that you are implicitly not allowed to just use the standard + operator on two tailored unsigned ints, are you? – Yunnosch Mar 27 '18 at 5:43
2

Well, first of all: There are much better approaches than the one you have chosen. However, this answer will stick to your approach and explain why your code is failing.

As far as I can tell the idea behind your approach is:

1) Cover the case where no input is HIGH (i.e. you start by turning of all LEDs). 1 case.

2) Cover the cases where exactly 1 input is high. 4 cases.

3) Cover the cases where exactly 2 inputs are high. 6 cases.

4) Cover the cases where exactly 3 inputs are high. 4 cases.

5) Cover the case where all 4 inputs are high. 1 case.

That approach will work because step 5 takes priority over step 4 and step 4 takes priority over step 3 and so on. That is, even if you set an incorrect output in e.g. step 4, it will be corrected by step 5 (if all inputs are HIGH).

So what is wrong with your code?

The problem is that you don't cover all cases. For instance you never cover b1 and b4 both being HIGH.

Also you have a typo bug here:

if(b2Value == HIGH && b4Value == HIGH && b2Value == HIGH)
   ^^^                                   ^^^

Further, your code shall never check for LOW like you do here:

if(b2Value == HIGH && b3Value == LOW && b4Value == LOW)

The LOW value is handled implicit by the priority of the if-statements.

In total you must have the initialization plus 15 if-statements.

So your code should be:

  // Handle 1 case with no input high
  digitalWrite(LED0Pin, LOW);
  digitalWrite(LED1Pin, LOW);
  digitalWrite(LED2Pin, LOW);

  // Handle 4 cases with exactly 1 input being high
  if (b1Value == HIGH)
  {
      ...
  }
  else if (b2Value == HIGH)
  {
      ...
  }
  else if (b3Value == HIGH)
  {
      ...
  }
  else if (b4Value == HIGH)
  {
      ...
  }

  // Handle 6 cases with exactly 2 input being high
  if(b1Value == HIGH && b2Value == HIGH )
  {
    ...
  }
  else if(b1Value == HIGH && b3Value == HIGH )
  {
    ...
  }
  else if(b1Value == HIGH && b4Value == HIGH)
  {
    ...
  }
  else if(b2Value == HIGH && b3Value == HIGH)
  {
    ...
  }
  else if(b2Value == HIGH && b4Value == HIGH)
  {
    ...
  }
  else if(b3Value == HIGH && b4Value == HIGH)
  {
    ...
  }

  // Handle 4 cases with exactly 3 input being high
  if(b1Value == HIGH && b2Value == HIGH  && b3Value == HIGH)
  {
      ...
  }
  else if(b1Value == HIGH && b2Value == HIGH  && b4Value == HIGH)
  {
      ...
  }
  else if(b1Value == HIGH && b3Value == HIGH  && b4Value == HIGH)
  {
      ...
  }
  else if(b2Value == HIGH && b3Value == HIGH  && b4Value == HIGH)
  {
      ...
  }

  // Handle 1 cases with exactly 4 input being high
  if(b1Value == HIGH && b2Value == HIGH && b3Value == HIGH && b4Value == HIGH)
  {
      ...
  }

The above explains why your code isn't working and how to fix it.

But as you can see the approach is very error prone (i.e. it's so easy to miss a case). Besides that it also has bad performance. So I'll recommend a more simple approach.

int temp = 2 * digitalRead(A1Pin) +
               digitalRead(A0Pin) +
           2 * digitalRead(B1Pin) +
               digitalRead(B0Pin);

output0 = (temp & 1) == 1;
output1 = (temp & 2) == 2;
output2 = (temp & 4) == 4;
1

The pins are nicely labeled: A1Pin, A0Pin, etc. The variable names should follow that same convention: a1Value, a0Value, etc. That will make the if statements easier to understand.

Then you just need to be systematic about the if statements. With 4 inputs, there are sixteen possible combinations, and you need an if statement for each one. And every if statement should check every input value.

So the first two if statements are

if (a1Value == LOW && a0Value == LOW && b1Value == LOW && b0Value == LOW)
{
    digitalWrite(LED0Pin,LOW);   // 0 + 0 = 0
    digitalWrite(LED1Pin,LOW);
    digitalWrite(LED2Pin,LOW);
}
else if a1Value == LOW && a0Value == LOW && b1Value == LOW && b0Value == HIGH) 
{
    digitalWrite(LED0Pin,HIGH);  // 0 + 1 = 1
    digitalWrite(LED1Pin,LOW);
    digitalWrite(LED2Pin,LOW);
}

and the last if statement is

else if (a1Value == HIGH && a0Value == HIGH && b1Value == HIGH && b0Value == HIGH)
{
    digitalWrite(LED0Pin,LOW);   // 3 + 3 = 6
    digitalWrite(LED1Pin,HIGH);
    digitalWrite(LED2Pin,HIGH);
}

and there are 13 more to go.

Now of course there are other ways to do this, but I thought I would just help you finish what you started.

Once you get the code working, you can post it on code review and you'll get all sorts of suggestions on how to optimize it.

1

following Yunnosch comment this is what he meant you can pre calculate the valu of the addition and then display it to the LEDs this simplefies the code greatly the code below should work - or at least serve as a guideline I commented in an example for you to understand the logic, hope it helps

NOTE: since i am not infront of an Arduino this code is not tested - but it does compile

int A0Pin = 12;
int A1Pin = 11;
int B0Pin = 10;
int B1Pin = 9;

int LED0Pin = 6;
int LED1Pin = 5;
int LED2Pin = 4;

void setup()
{
  pinMode(A0Pin, INPUT);
  pinMode(A1Pin, INPUT);
  pinMode(B0Pin, INPUT);
  pinMode(B1Pin, INPUT);

  pinMode(LED0Pin, OUTPUT);
  pinMode(LED1Pin, OUTPUT);
  pinMode(LED2Pin, OUTPUT);
}

void loop()
{
  int b1Value = digitalRead(A0Pin);
  int b2Value = digitalRead(A1Pin);
  int b3Value = digitalRead(B0Pin);
  int b4Value = digitalRead(B1Pin);

  // b1 is set to represent 1 and b2 will represent 2 same with b3 and b4 pair
  // lets assume b1 = 1 b2 = 0 the number is 1
  // b3 is set to 1 and b4 is set to 1
  // input : b2|b1 + b4|b3
  //          0| 1    1| 1
  // sum = 1*1 + 0*2 + 1*1 + 1*2 = 4 - which is represented in binary as b100
  int sum = (b1Value * 1) + (b2Value * 2) + (b3Value * 1) + (b4Value * 2);

  if (sum & 0x1) //binary rep b001 - following the example will result in 0
    digitalWrite(LED0Pin, HIGH);
  else
    digitalWrite(LED0Pin, LOW);

  if (sum & 0x2) //binary rep b010 - following the example will result in 0
    digitalWrite(LED1Pin, HIGH);
  else
    digitalWrite(LED1Pin, LOW);

  if (sum & 0x4) //binary rep b100 - following the example will result in 1
    digitalWrite(LED2Pin, HIGH);
  else
    digitalWrite(LED2Pin, LOW);

  delay(10);
}
1

It rather depends whether you're tasked with simulating a full adder or emulating one. If you're emulating one, you can use the fact that the pins are (at least for most variants) assigned to the AVR ports and just have.

void loop() {
    int a = (PORTB >> 3) & 3; // take the two 'A' bits from the input port and make a number between 0 and 3
    int b = (PORTB >> 1) & 3; // likewise for 'B'
    PORTD = ( a + b ) << 4;   // add them together and shift to light the LEDs
}

Which is what I'd do if I didn't have a 7482 and wanted to emulate one.

If the objective is to demonstrate how a full adder is created by combining logic, then create that using the half adder logic sum = a xor b and carry = a and b and the full-adder logic sum = ( a xor b ) xor c and carry = ( a and b ) or ( c and ( a xor b ) ).

void loop() {
    // input a as two separate bits
    bool a0 = digitalRead(A0Pin);
    bool a1 = digitalRead(A1Pin);

    // input b as two separate bits
    bool b0 = digitalRead(B0Pin);
    bool b1 = digitalRead(B1Pin);

    // half adder for digit 0 of output sum and carry
    bool s0 = a0 ^ b0;
    bool c0 = a0 & b0;

    // full adder for digit 1 of output sum and carry
    bool s1 = (a1 ^ b1) ^ c0;
    bool c1 = (a1 & b1) | (c0 & (a1 ^ b1));

    digitalWrite(LED0Pin, s0);
    digitalWrite(LED1Pin, s1);
    digitalWrite(LED2Pin, c1); // digit2 of output will be carry from digit 1
}

The difference here is that it's showing the working, and tells the instructor you've understood what an adder is for rather than just turning the truth table into a set of if statements. You might get away with it for a two-bit adder, but you don't want to be writing out all possible inputs and outputs of, say, an 8-bit adder by hand.

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