I've read a lot about SQL injection, and using parameters, from sources like bobby-tables.com. However, I'm working with a complex application in Access, that has a lot of dynamic SQL with string concatenation in all sorts of places.

It has the following things I want to change, and add parameters to, to avoid errors and allow me to handle names with single quotes, like Jack O'Connel.

It uses:

  • DoCmd.RunSQL to execute SQL commands
  • DAO recordsets
  • ADODB recordsets
  • Forms and reports, opened with DoCmd.OpenForm and DoCmd.OpenReport, using string concatenation in the WhereCondition argument
  • Domain aggregates like DLookUp that use string concatenation

The queries are mostly structured like this:

DoCmd.RunSQL "INSERT INTO Table1(Field1) SELECT Field1 FROM Table2 WHERE ID = " & Me.SomeTextbox

What are my options to use parameters for these different kinds of queries?

This question is intended as a resource, for the frequent how do I use parameters comment on various posts

  • 3
    This question is specifically about using parameters, but it might be worth noting that you can safely use string concatenation by using Gustav's CSql() function . – Andre Mar 27 at 14:00
up vote 15 down vote accepted

There are many ways to use parameters in queries. I will try to provide examples for most of them, and where they are applicable.

First, we'll discuss the solutions unique to Access, such as forms, reports and domain aggregates. Then, we'll talk about DAO and ADO.


Using values from forms and reports as parameters

In Access, you can directly use the current value of controls on forms and reports in your SQL code. This limits the need for parameters.

You can refer to controls in the following way:

Forms!MyForm!MyTextbox for a simple control on a form

Forms!MyForm!MySubform.Form!MyTextbox for a control on a subform

Reports!MyReport!MyTextbox for a control on a report

Sample implementation:

DoCmd.RunSQL "INSERT INTO Table1(Field1) SELECT Forms!MyForm!MyTextbox" 'Inserts a single value
DoCmd.RunSQL "INSERT INTO Table1(Field1) SELECT Field1 FROM Table2 WHERE ID = Forms!MyForm!MyTextbox" 'Inserts from a different table

This is available for the following uses:

When using DoCmd.RunSQL, normal queries (in the GUI), form and report record sources, form and report filters, domain aggregates, DoCmd.OpenForm and DoCmd.OpenReport

This is not available for the following uses:

When executing queries using DAO or ADODB (e.g. opening recordsets, CurrentDb.Execute)


Using TempVars as parameters

TempVars in Access are globally available variables, that can be set in VBA or using macro's. They can be reused for multiple queries.

Sample implementation:

TempVars!MyTempVar = Me.MyTextbox.Value 'Note: .Value is required
DoCmd.RunSQL "INSERT INTO Table1(Field1) SELECT Field1 FROM Table2 WHERE ID = TempVars!MyTempVar"
TempVars.Remove "MyTempVar" 'Unset TempVar when you're done using it

Availability for TempVars is identical to that of values from forms and reports: not available for ADO and DAO, available for other uses.

I recommend TempVars for using parameters when opening forms or reports over referring to control names, since if the object opening it closes, the TempVars stay available. I recommend using unique TempVar names for every form or report, to avoid weirdness when refreshing forms or reports.


Using custom functions (UDFs) as parameters

Much like TempVars, you can use a custom function and static variables to store and retrieve values.

Sample implementation:

Option Compare Database
Option Explicit

Private ThisDate As Date


Public Function GetThisDate() As Date
    If ThisDate = #12:00:00 AM# Then
        ' Set default value.
        ThisDate = Date
    End If 
    GetThisDate = ThisDate
End Function


Public Function SetThisDate(ByVal NewDate As Date) As Date
    ThisDate = NewDate
    SetThisDate = ThisDate
End Function

and then:

SetThisDate SomeDateValue ' Will store SomeDateValue in ThisDate.
DoCmd.RunSQL "INSERT INTO Table1(Field1) SELECT Field1 FROM Table2 WHERE [SomeDateField] = GetThisDate()"

Also, a single function with an optional parameter may be created for both setting and getting the value of a private static variable:

Public Function ThisValue(Optional ByVal Value As Variant) As Variant
    Static CurrentValue As Variant
    ' Define default return value.
    Const DefaultValue  As Variant = Null

    If Not IsMissing(Value) Then
        ' Set value.
        CurrentValue = Value
    ElseIf IsEmpty(CurrentValue) Then
        ' Set default value
        CurrentValue = DefaultValue
    End If
    ' Return value.
    ThisValue = CurrentValue
End Function

To set a value:

ThisValue "Some text value"

To get the value:

CurrentValue = ThisValue

In a query:

ThisValue "SomeText"  ' Set value to filter on.
DoCmd.RunSQL "INSERT INTO Table1(Field1) SELECT Field1 FROM Table2 WHERE [SomeField] = ThisValue()"

Using DoCmd.SetParameter

The uses of DoCmd.SetParameter are rather limited, so I'll be brief. It allows you to set a parameter for use in DoCmd.OpenForm, DoCmd.OpenReport and some other DoCmd statements, but it doesn't work with DoCmd.RunSQL, filters, DAO and ADO.

Sample implementation

DoCmd.SetParameter "MyParameter", Me.MyTextbox
DoCmd.OpenForm "MyForm",,, "ID = MyParameter"

Using DAO

In DAO, we can use the DAO.QueryDef object to create a query, set parameters, and then either open up a recordset or execute the query. You first set the queries' SQL, then use the QueryDef.Parameters collection to set the parameters.

In my example, I'm going to use implicit parameter types. If you want to make them explicit, add a PARAMETERS declaration to your query.

Sample implementation

'Execute query, unnamed parameters
With CurrentDb.CreateQueryDef("", "INSERT INTO Table1(Field1) SELECT Field1 FROM Table2 WHERE Field1 = ?p1 And Field2 = ?p2")
    .Parameters(0) = Me.Field1
    .Parameters(1) = Me.Field2
    .Execute
End With

'Open recordset, named parameters
Dim rs As DAO.Recordset
With CurrentDb.CreateQueryDef("", "SELECT Field1 FROM Table2 WHERE Field1 = FirstParameter And Field2 = SecondParameter")
    .Parameters!FirstParameter = Me.Field1 'Bang notation
    .Parameters("SecondParameter").Value = Me.Field2 'More explicit notation
    Set rs = .OpenRecordset
End With

While this is only available in DAO, you can set many things to DAO recordsets to make them use parameters, such as form recordsets, list box recordsets and combo box recordsets. However, since Access uses the text, and not the recordset, when sorting and filtering, those things may prove problematic if you do.


Using ADO

You can use parameters in ADO by using the ADODB.Command object. Use Command.CreateParameter to create parameters, and then append them to the Command.Parameters collection.

You can use the .Parameters collection in ADO to explicitly declare parameters, or pass a parameter array to the Command.Execute method to implicitly pass parameters.

ADO does not support named parameters. While you can pass a name, it's not processed.

Sample implementation:

'Execute query, unnamed parameters
Dim cmd As ADODB.Command
Set cmd = New ADODB.Command
With cmd
    Set .ActiveConnection = CurrentProject.Connection 'Use a connection to the current database
    .CommandText = "INSERT INTO Table1(Field1) SELECT Field1 FROM Table2 WHERE Field1 = ? And Field2 = ?"
    .Parameters.Append .CreateParameter(, adVarWChar, adParamInput, Len(Me.Field1), Me.Field1) 'adVarWChar for text boxes that may contain unicode
    .Parameters.Append .CreateParameter(, adInteger, adParamInput, 8, Me.Field2) 'adInteger for whole numbers (long or integer)
    .Execute
End With

'Open recordset, implicit parameters
Dim rs As ADODB.Recordset
Dim cmd As ADODB.Command
Set cmd = New ADODB.Command
With cmd
    Set .ActiveConnection = CurrentProject.Connection 'Use a connection to the current database
    .CommandText = "SELECT Field1 FROM Table2 WHERE Field1 = @FirstParameter And Field2 = @SecondParameter"
     Set rs = .Execute(,Array(Me.Field1, Me.Field2))
End With

The same limitations as opening DAO recordsets apply. While this way is limited to executing queries and opening recordsets, you can use those recordsets elsewhere in your application.

  • 1
    Nice round-up. But I think you miss my favourite method: the option to use a custom function that returns the value of a static variable you set with the same function or with another (sub)function. Much like TempVars. – Gustav Mar 29 at 9:25
  • @Gustav Feel free to edit it in. I marked it as a community wiki, so everyone can make contributions, and no-one will earn rep. I haven't used that technique a lot, so you'll probably know the details better than I do. – Erik von Asmuth Mar 29 at 9:28
  • No, this is new to me. But I've inserted the section. – Gustav Mar 29 at 17:18
  • Even in a 'pure Access' context, if you have linked table pointing to Oracle or SQL Server, some of these methods will have a huge negative performance impact. More: for Oracle, referencing a form field in a query simply doen't work when using Oracle's ODBC driver, while it may work when using Microsoft's driver for Oracle. – Patrick Honorez Sep 5 at 8:44
  • @PatrickHonorez I don't have an Oracle environment ready for testing, but for SQL server, the performance impact should be equal to executing the query using the same function but with string concatenation, and it should just work independent of which driver you're using. Obviously, using DoCmd.RunSQL instead of directly using ADODB or DAO passthrough queries is far from ideal, and that will likely explain your performance loss. As said, using a form field as a parameter is not available in many contexts – Erik von Asmuth Sep 5 at 9:05

I have built a fairly basic query builder class to get around the mess of string concatenation and to handle the lack of named parameters. Creating a query is fairly simple.

Public Function GetQuery() As String

    With New MSAccessQueryBuilder
        .QueryBody = "SELECT * FROM tblEmployees"

        .AddPredicate "StartDate > @StartDate OR StatusChangeDate > @StartDate"
        .AddPredicate "StatusIndicator IN (@Active, @LeaveOfAbsence) OR Grade > @Grade"
        .AddPredicate "Salary > @SalaryThreshhold"
        .AddPredicate "Retired = @IsRetired"

        .AddStringParameter "Active", "A"
        .AddLongParameter "Grade", 10
        .AddBooleanParameter "IsRetired", False
        .AddStringParameter "LeaveOfAbsence", "L"
        .AddCurrencyParameter "SalaryThreshhold", 9999.99@
        .AddDateParameter "StartDate", #3/29/2018#

        .QueryFooter = "ORDER BY ID ASC"
        GetQuery = .ToString

    End With

End Function

The output of the ToString() method looks like:

SELECT * FROM tblEmployees WHERE 1 = 1 AND (StartDate > #3/29/2018# OR StatusChangeDate > #3/29/2018#) AND (StatusIndicator IN ('A', 'L') OR Grade > 10) AND (Salary > 9999.99) AND (Retired = False) ORDER BY ID ASC;

Each predicate is wrapped in parens to handle linked AND/OR clauses, and parameters with the same name only have to be declared once. Full code is at my github and reproduced below. I also have a version for Oracle passthrough queries that uses ADODB parameters. Eventually, I'd like to wrap both in an IQueryBuilder interface.


VERSION 1.0 CLASS
BEGIN
  MultiUse = -1  'True
END
Attribute VB_Name = "MSAccessQueryBuilder"
Attribute VB_GlobalNameSpace = False
Attribute VB_Creatable = True
Attribute VB_PredeclaredId = False
Attribute VB_Exposed = True
'@Folder("VBALibrary.Data")
'@Description("Provides tools to construct Microsoft Access SQL statements containing predicates and parameters.")

Option Explicit

Private Const mlngErrorNumber As Long = vbObjectError + 513
Private Const mstrClassName As String = "MSAccessQueryBuilder"
Private Const mstrParameterExistsErrorMessage As String = "A parameter with this name has already been added to the Parameters dictionary."

Private Type TSqlBuilder
    QueryBody As String
    QueryFooter As String
End Type

Private mobjParameters As Object
Private mobjPredicates As Collection
Private this As TSqlBuilder


' =============================================================================
' CONSTRUCTOR / DESTRUCTOR
' =============================================================================

Private Sub Class_Initialize()
    Set mobjParameters = CreateObject("Scripting.Dictionary")
    Set mobjPredicates = New Collection
End Sub


' =============================================================================
' PROPERTIES
' =============================================================================

'@Description("Gets or sets the query statement (SELECT, INSERT, UPDATE, DELETE), exclusive of any predicates.")
Public Property Get QueryBody() As String
    QueryBody = this.QueryBody
End Property
Public Property Let QueryBody(ByVal Value As String)
    this.QueryBody = Value
End Property

'@Description("Gets or sets post-predicate query statements (e.g., GROUP BY, ORDER BY).")
Public Property Get QueryFooter() As String
    QueryFooter = this.QueryFooter
End Property
Public Property Let QueryFooter(ByVal Value As String)
    this.QueryFooter = Value
End Property


' =============================================================================
' PUBLIC METHODS
' =============================================================================

'@Description("Maps a boolean parameter and its value to the query builder.")
'@Param("strName: The parameter's name.")
'@Param("blnValue: The parameter's value.")
Public Sub AddBooleanParameter(ByVal strName As String, ByVal blnValue As Boolean)
    If mobjParameters.Exists(strName) Then
        Err.Raise mlngErrorNumber, mstrClassName & ".AddBooleanParameter", mstrParameterExistsErrorMessage
    Else
        mobjParameters.Add strName, CStr(blnValue)
    End If
End Sub

' =============================================================================

'@Description("Maps a currency parameter and its value to the query builder.")
'@Param("strName: The parameter's name.")
'@Param("curValue: The parameter's value.")
Public Sub AddCurrencyParameter(ByVal strName As String, ByVal curValue As Currency)
    If mobjParameters.Exists(strName) Then
        Err.Raise mlngErrorNumber, mstrClassName & ".AddCurrencyParameter", mstrParameterExistsErrorMessage
    Else
        mobjParameters.Add strName, CStr(curValue)
    End If
End Sub

' =============================================================================

'@Description("Maps a date parameter and its value to the query builder.")
'@Param("strName: The parameter's name.")
'@Param("dtmValue: The parameter's value.")
Public Sub AddDateParameter(ByVal strName As String, ByVal dtmValue As Date)
    If mobjParameters.Exists(strName) Then
        Err.Raise mlngErrorNumber, mstrClassName & ".AddDateParameter", mstrParameterExistsErrorMessage
    Else
        mobjParameters.Add strName, "#" & CStr(dtmValue) & "#"
    End If
End Sub

' =============================================================================

'@Description("Maps a long parameter and its value to the query builder.")
'@Param("strName: The parameter's name.")
'@Param("lngValue: The parameter's value.")
Public Sub AddLongParameter(ByVal strName As String, ByVal lngValue As Long)
    If mobjParameters.Exists(strName) Then
        Err.Raise mlngErrorNumber, mstrClassName & ".AddNumericParameter", mstrParameterExistsErrorMessage
    Else
        mobjParameters.Add strName, CStr(lngValue)
    End If
End Sub

' =============================================================================

'@Description("Adds a predicate to the query's WHERE criteria.")
'@Param("strPredicate: The predicate text to be added.")
Public Sub AddPredicate(ByVal strPredicate As String)
    mobjPredicates.Add "(" & strPredicate & ")"
End Sub

' =============================================================================

'@Description("Maps a string parameter and its value to the query builder.")
'@Param("strName: The parameter's name.")
'@Param("strValue: The parameter's value.")
Public Sub AddStringParameter(ByVal strName As String, ByVal strValue As String)
    If mobjParameters.Exists(strName) Then
        Err.Raise mlngErrorNumber, mstrClassName & ".AddStringParameter", mstrParameterExistsErrorMessage
    Else
        mobjParameters.Add strName, "'" & strValue & "'"
    End If
End Sub

' =============================================================================

'@Description("Parses the query, its predicates, and any parameter values, and outputs an SQL statement.")
'@Returns("A string containing the parsed query.")
Public Function ToString() As String

Dim strPredicatesWithValues As String

    Const strErrorSource As String = "QueryBuilder.ToString"

    If this.QueryBody = vbNullString Then
        Err.Raise mlngErrorNumber, strErrorSource, "No query body is currently defined. Unable to build valid SQL."
    End If
    ToString = this.QueryBody

    strPredicatesWithValues = ReplaceParametersWithValues(GetPredicatesText)
    EnsureParametersHaveValues strPredicatesWithValues

    If Not strPredicatesWithValues = vbNullString Then
        ToString = ToString & " " & strPredicatesWithValues
    End If

    If Not this.QueryFooter = vbNullString Then
        ToString = ToString & " " & this.QueryFooter & ";"
    End If

End Function


' =============================================================================
' PRIVATE METHODS
' =============================================================================

'@Description("Ensures that all parameters defined in the query have been provided a value.")
'@Param("strQueryText: The query text to verify.")
Private Sub EnsureParametersHaveValues(ByVal strQueryText As String)

Dim strUnmatchedParameter As String
Dim lngMatchedPoisition As Long
Dim lngWordEndPosition As Long

    Const strProcedureName As String = "EnsureParametersHaveValues"

    lngMatchedPoisition = InStr(1, strQueryText, "@", vbTextCompare)
    If lngMatchedPoisition <> 0 Then
        lngWordEndPosition = InStr(lngMatchedPoisition, strQueryText, Space$(1), vbTextCompare)
        strUnmatchedParameter = Mid$(strQueryText, lngMatchedPoisition, lngWordEndPosition - lngMatchedPoisition)
    End If

    If Not strUnmatchedParameter = vbNullString Then
        Err.Raise mlngErrorNumber, mstrClassName & "." & strProcedureName, "Parameter " & strUnmatchedParameter & " has not been provided a value."
    End If

End Sub

' =============================================================================

'@Description("Combines each predicate in the predicates collection into a single string statement.")
'@Returns("A string containing the text of all predicates added to the query builder.")
Private Function GetPredicatesText() As String

Dim strPredicates As String
Dim vntPredicate As Variant

    If mobjPredicates.Count > 0 Then
        strPredicates = "WHERE 1 = 1"
        For Each vntPredicate In mobjPredicates
            strPredicates = strPredicates & " AND " & CStr(vntPredicate)
        Next vntPredicate
    End If

    GetPredicatesText = strPredicates

End Function

' =============================================================================

'@Description("Replaces parameters in the predicates statements with their provided values.")
'@Param("strPredicates: The text of the query's predicates.")
'@Returns("A string containing the predicates text with its parameters replaces by their provided values.")
Private Function ReplaceParametersWithValues(ByVal strPredicates As String) As String

Dim vntKey As Variant
Dim strParameterName As String
Dim strParameterValue As String
Dim strPredicatesWithValues As String

    Const strProcedureName As String = "ReplaceParametersWithValues"

    strPredicatesWithValues = strPredicates
    For Each vntKey In mobjParameters.Keys
        strParameterName = CStr(vntKey)
        strParameterValue = CStr(mobjParameters(vntKey))

        If InStr(1, strPredicatesWithValues, "@" & strParameterName, vbTextCompare) = 0 Then
            Err.Raise mlngErrorNumber, mstrClassName & "." & strProcedureName, "Parameter " & strParameterName & " was not found in the query."
        Else
            strPredicatesWithValues = Replace(strPredicatesWithValues, "@" & strParameterName, strParameterValue, 1, -1, vbTextCompare)
        End If
    Next vntKey

    ReplaceParametersWithValues = strPredicatesWithValues

End Function

' =============================================================================
  • This class doesn't solve many of the issues of string concatenation. Issues that are still present are: incorrect handling of null values, incorrect handling of strings with quotes and incorrect handling of dates in locales with dd-mm-yyyy formatting. Also, using Replace causes issues if there are parameters with overlapping names, e.g. @a and @age. While I appreciate the effort, in it's current form I'd prefer true parameters any day. Also, DAO has support for named parameters. I appreciate the effort, though. You can get such classes reviewed at Code Review. – Erik von Asmuth Mar 30 at 6:43

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