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I'm trying to implement a recursive deleting algorithm for a binary search tree and have successfully done that but it breaks the ordering algorithms (inorder, preorder and postorder). Heres my code for the delete function

void remove_rec(string word, Node* ptr) {

        if (word < ptr->data && ptr->left != nullptr) {
            remove_rec(word, ptr->left);
        }
        else if (word > ptr->data && ptr->right != nullptr) {
            remove_rec(word, ptr->right);
        }
        else {
            //if the node has no children
            if (ptr->left == nullptr && ptr->right == nullptr) {
                delete(ptr);
                ptr = nullptr;
            }
            //if there is a right child
            else if (ptr->left == nullptr && ptr->right != nullptr) {
                Node* temp = ptr;
                ptr = ptr->right;
                delete temp;
            }
            //if there is a left child
            else if (ptr->left != nullptr && ptr->right == nullptr) {
                Node* temp = ptr;
                ptr = ptr->left;
                delete temp;
            }
        }
    }

The program seems to crash when the inorder (or any other sorting method) is called recursively and the left or right node is empty. Instead of skipping that if statement, the program keeps trying to access the left node until it crashes with the error 'Read access violation'. If I don't call the remove_rec function, the sorting functions work as intended. To me, it seems as if I'm not building the tree correctly after removing the node. Any help is much appreciated! I only included the code that i think is causing the problem if that function is not called, everything works as intended.

  • Where is the parent link needed to restore the link to the tree above the node you just deleted? The code would "probably" work fine if you are to just delete the leaf node which has left and right as nullptr – Samer Tufail Mar 27 '18 at 10:36
  • 1
    what if both of the children are not null and word is equal to the data? I think this is what breaks your algorithm – Ashkan Mar 27 '18 at 10:53
0

You are not modifying the pointers you think you are. The lines

ptr = nullptr;

ptr = ptr->right;

ptr = ptr->left;

Modify the local parameter ptr, which is a distinct copy of one of your Node's children. You need to pass ptr by reference for the modifications to have any effect.

The reason that you are getting 'Read access violation' is because the value of the pointer in the node is still the same as before you removed, but it is now invalid, because you deleted the object.

You are also copying the data you are searching for, which is rather inefficient.

void remove_rec(const std::string & word, Node *& ptr) {
    if (word < ptr->data && ptr->left != nullptr) {
        remove_rec(word, ptr->left);
    }
    else if (word > ptr->data && ptr->right != nullptr) {
        remove_rec(word, ptr->right);
    }
    else {
        //if the node has no children
        if (ptr->left == nullptr && ptr->right == nullptr) {
            delete(ptr);
            ptr = nullptr;
        }
        //if there is a right child
        else if (ptr->left == nullptr && ptr->right != nullptr) {
            Node* temp = ptr;
            ptr = ptr->right;
            delete temp;
        }
        //if there is a left child
        else if (ptr->left != nullptr && ptr->right == nullptr) {
            Node* temp = ptr;
            ptr = ptr->left;
            delete temp;
        }
        // TODO: handle case when node has both left and right child
    }
}

Also, I would change Node to use std::unique_ptr<Node> for it's left and right. You will then be presented with compile time errors if you make similar mistakes in the future.

  • The logic to delete the middle element is still not correct even if you pass by reference. – Samer Tufail Mar 27 '18 at 11:31
  • I know, but that is a separate question – Caleth Mar 27 '18 at 11:45
  • I disagree with the suggestion to use smart pointers in this situation. In almost any other case, it is the right suggestion, but a basic data structure like a binary search tree should be fast and as space-efficient as possible. – Mike Borkland Mar 27 '18 at 11:54
  • @MikeBorkland std::unique_ptr<Node> is a zero overhead abstraction over Node * used correctly. – Caleth Mar 27 '18 at 11:58

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