16

The orignal code is

if(object==null){
  throw new CustomException(ErrorEnum.OBJECT_NULL)
}

now I want to use Optional to handle NullPointerException. Just like this

Optional.ofNullable(object).orElseThrow(()->{throw new CustomException(ErrorEnum.OBJECT_NULL);}

But doing this makes code much longer than original. Maybe I should use the first way to solve the problem?

4
  • 3
    Yes, Optional is totally unnecessary here. The first way is better. Commented Mar 27, 2018 at 10:46
  • 4
    note, you're expected to supply the desired exception, not to throw it. orElseThrow(()->{throw new CustomException(ErrorEnum.OBJECT_NULL);} can be simplified to orElseThrow(()-> new CustomException(ErrorEnum.OBJECT_NULL)
    – Ousmane D.
    Commented Mar 27, 2018 at 10:57
  • 4
    That said, in this particular, I'd go with the first approach. optionals are useful when they're used correctly, in this case, there is no need to use it.
    – Ousmane D.
    Commented Mar 27, 2018 at 10:58
  • 2
    You shouldn't create and throw away an optional inside a method. The if is shorter, more readable, and more efficient in terms of performance and memory. Only use optionals a return values for methods. Commented Mar 27, 2018 at 11:09

3 Answers 3

21
Optional.ofNullable(object).orElseThrow(() -> new CustomException(ErrorEnum.OBJECT_NULL));

If you read the method definition in Optional javadoc

public <X extends Throwable> T orElseThrow(Supplier<? extends X> exceptionSupplier) throws X extends Throwable

This shows that you require a Supplier of X where X extends Throwable. Supplier is an interface with a method get. Since it has only 1 abstract method, its a Functional Interface which you can instantiate using Lambda expressions.

Since it takes no parameter we will do () -> new CustomException("your error message"); This creates an instance of Supplier which returns a CustomException object when get is invoked which I am passing as the parameter to the orElseThrow.

Having said all that, you should not use Optional for this use case as it provides no benefit to you.

Hope that helps :)

9

Optionals are intended as a safer alternative than a reference of type T that refers to an object or null, but it's only safer or better if you use it correctly. Both the examples given are safe but it's not better to use an Optional to solely replace an if statement as shown.

Also, note that you're expected to supply the desired exception, not to throw it. i.e.

orElseThrow(() ->{throw new CustomException(ErrorEnum.OBJECT_NULL);}

should be

orElseThrow(() ->{return new CustomException(ErrorEnum.OBJECT_NULL);} 

or better

orElseThrow(() -> new CustomException(ErrorEnum.OBJECT_NULL));

That said, in this particular, I'd go with the first approach. optionals are useful when they're used correctly, i.e as a method return type to wrap a value that may or may not be present as well as code documentation. Thus, in this case, there is no need to use it.

6

I agree with commenters and other answers who are saying that Optional is unnecessary here. Indeed, it echoes advice I've also given elsewhere. In this case if one already has a nullable variable object then it's rather roundabout to wrap it in an Optional just to throw an exception, and as you observe, it's longer than the original.

The question to ask instead is, where did the reference in object come from? Did it come from another method that returns a nullable reference? If so, then perhaps that other method should be refactored to return Optional<T> instead of a nullable reference of type T.

1
  • Actually objectcomes from ObjectDao,after reading your answer.i think i should refactored all query methods to return Optional<T>.But I want to know if this is reasonable.
    – StupidPz
    Commented Mar 28, 2018 at 7:04

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