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If I use yarn add <package-name>, Yarn will install both dependencies and devDependencies of <package-name>. Is it intended?

I checked the documentation but I couldn't find a way to prevent installing the development dependencies. devDependencies are the dependencies that were used to compile the sources of one package, therefore if I am in a production environment I don't need them.

6 Answers 6

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Use --production=true (or simply --production or --prod for short). It is indeed normal behaviour; Yarn assumes you are in a 'development' context unless your NODE_ENV environment variable is set to 'production'.

Have a look at Yarn's documentation.

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  • 5
    This functionality seems to be broken due to github.com/yarnpkg/yarn/issues/6323
    – brodybits
    Jun 18, 2019 at 1:54
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    Not "broken" but "badly designed" --prod still downloads and "installs" dev packages IF yarn needs to resolve "full tree". Just use yarn install --production --frozen-lockfile and matching yarn.lock and --production will work as expected.
    – ddotsenko
    Jul 5, 2020 at 20:54
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    --production flag has been deprecated for yarn 2.0. How to prevent yarn 2.0 from installing dev dependencies?
    – akshat
    Apr 2, 2021 at 5:45
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    Late to the party but the new way to do this in Yarn 2+ is by using yarn workspaces focus --production --all: yarnpkg.com/cli/workspaces/focus
    – tomdaly
    Dec 8, 2021 at 14:41
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    Unfortunately I don't have an answer, but I'd like to note that none of the above is correct as of January 2022. Yarn will always install devDependencies regardless of options and NODE_ENV envvar.
    – Resisty
    Jan 26, 2022 at 1:07
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As said in the comment by @ddotsenko

Not "broken" but "badly designed" --prod still downloads and "installs" dev packages IF yarn needs to resolve "full tree". Just use yarn install --production --frozen-lockfile and matching yarn.lock and --production will work as expected.

That worked to remove a 210 MB node_modules to 70 MB, similar to npm and pnpm.

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NODE_ENV=production also prevent install devDependencies

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    use NODE_ENV=production as environments before excute yarn or yarn install
    – zyfyy
    Dec 7, 2021 at 4:26
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With Yarn 2+, it seems that Yarn focuses on PnP installs, meaning a content-addressable data-structure that replaces classic node_modules and is assumed to be part of the package, hence package sources will automatically include devDependencies.

Nevertheless, yarn workspaces focus <name> --production allows to install a workspace package without `devDependencies. See https://yarnpkg.com/cli/workspaces/focus for more information.

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  • Please share your package.json, and share more information about your environment such as the package manager that you used yarn|npm|pnpm and what the versions and system information. Sep 15, 2022 at 15:06
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Yarn has a --production option, which will cause it to install only production dependencies. This is shown here

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    bro this flag doesn't even work... that's the main issue Aug 8, 2022 at 9:14
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The existing answers seem to miss the point of the question (including the accepted answer).

If I invoke yarn add <my-package>, Yarn will install both dependencies and devDependencies of <my-package>. Is it normal behavior?

No, this sounds like a bug. I don't see this behaviour with the latest version of yarn v1.

If I yarn add foo to my project, I should then have installed:

  • my direct dependencies
  • foo
  • any dependencies of foo and their dependencies recursively
  • not devDependencies of foo
  • devDependencies of my project (unless using various production flags/vars mentioned in other answers)
  • (as far as I know, yarn doesn't automatically install peer dependencies as in recent npm versions)

If you are running yarn add it can be assumed you are in a "dev" context.

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