How do I add local jar files (not yet part of the Maven repository) directly in my project's library sources?

27 Answers 27

up vote 459 down vote accepted

Install the JAR into your local Maven repository as follows:

mvn install:install-file \
   -Dfile=<path-to-file> \
   -DgroupId=<group-id> \
   -DartifactId=<artifact-id> \
   -Dversion=<version> \
   -Dpackaging=<packaging> \
   -DgeneratePom=true

Where each refers to:

< path-to-file >: the path to the file to load e.g -> c:\kaptcha-2.3.jar

< group-id >: the group that the file should be registered under e.g -> com.google.code

< artifact-id >: the artifact name for the file e.g -> kaptcha

< version >: the version of the file e.g -> 2.3

< packaging >: the packaging of the file e.g. -> jar

Reference

  • 5
    Instructions to install on my build had everything except the generatePom part. That appears to be crucial. – Jason D Jul 14 '14 at 18:43
  • 3
    <path-to-file> what does it mean ? Like C:/Users/XXX/WorkspaceDocx/maven/src/main/resources/myJar.jar...... or can we do ${project.basedir}/src/main/resources/myJar.jar – Igor Beaufils Aug 10 '15 at 14:06
  • 9
    The answer doesn't mention a README or that the jars are brought along. However, if the project brings the jars along then you might as well put the repo in the project as mentioned here stackoverflow.com/a/36602256/1000011 then you have no need for a README as the project will just work as if the jars were in maven central without any extra manual steps. – opticyclic Jun 27 '16 at 23:34
  • 6
    @opticyclic your comment needs more upvotes, or this answer needs to be edited. It is a recipe for disaster for novices who don't realize that installing to the local Maven repo would not include for everyone else. – Mike S Jul 28 '16 at 18:40
  • 3
    Maven's Guide to installing 3rd Party JARs – Nick Graham Nov 11 '16 at 19:17

You can add local dependencies directly (as mentioned in build maven project with propriatery libraries included) like this:

<dependency>
    <groupId>com.sample</groupId>
    <artifactId>sample</artifactId>
    <version>1.0</version>
    <scope>system</scope>
    <systemPath>${project.basedir}/src/main/resources/yourJar.jar</systemPath>
</dependency>
  • 34
    There are times when you want to specifically test an old jar for example, and I think this answer is a good fit for that. It's the one I needed. Upvoted – John Lockwood Oct 31 '14 at 21:19
  • 28
    As nice and easy as it looks, this solution has the problem that yourJar.jar will not be included in a WAR file for your app. – Matthias Aug 3 '15 at 20:58
  • 32
    Above solution doesn't work anymore, it returns: " 'dependencies.dependency.systemPath' for xx.jar should not point at files within the project directory" This has been already dealt in stackoverflow.com/questions/10935135/… – sarah.ferguson Dec 9 '15 at 14:31
  • 8
    In this answer, aren't the artifactId and groupId the wrong way around? – theonlygusti Mar 8 '17 at 8:18
  • 4
    According to Maven docu (maven.apache.org/guides/introduction/…): Important note: This is marked deprecated. – agassner Dec 19 '17 at 22:16

Firstly I would like to give credit for this answer to anonymous stackoverflow user - I am pretty sure I've seen similar answer here before - but now I cannot find it.

The best option for having local jar files as a dependency is to create local maven repository. Such repo is nothing else than proper directory structure with pom files in it.

On my example: I have master project on ${master_project} location and subroject1 is on ${master_project}/${subproject1}

then I am creating mvn repository in: ${master_project}/local-maven-repo

In pom file in subproject1 located ${master_project}/${subproject1}/pom.xml repository needs to be specified which would take file path as an url parameter:

<repositories>
    <repository>
        <id>local-maven-repo</id>
        <url>file:///${project.parent.basedir}/local-maven-repo</url>
    </repository>
</repositories>

Dependency can be specified as for any other repository. This makes your pom repository independent. For instance once desired jar is available in maven central you just need to delete it from your local repo and it will be pulled from default repo.

    <dependency>
        <groupId>org.apache.felix</groupId>
        <artifactId>org.apache.felix.servicebinder</artifactId>
        <version>0.9.0-SNAPSHOT</version>
    </dependency>

The last but not least thing to do is to add jar file to local repository using -DlocalRepositoryPath switch like here:

mvn org.apache.maven.plugins:maven-install-plugin:2.5.2:install-file  \
    -Dfile=/some/path/on/my/local/filesystem/felix/servicebinder/target/org.apache.felix.servicebinder-0.9.0-SNAPSHOT.jar \
    -DgroupId=org.apache.felix -DartifactId=org.apache.felix.servicebinder \
    -Dversion=0.9.0-SNAPSHOT -Dpackaging=jar \
    -DlocalRepositoryPath=${master_project}/local-maven-repo

Onece jar file is installed such mvn repo can be committed to code repository and whole set up is system independent. (working example in github)

I agree that having JARs committed to source code repo is not a good practice but in real life quick and dirty solution sometimes is better than full blown nexus repo to host one jar that you cannot publish.

  • Local relative directory as a maven repo... Helped a lot – sura2k Oct 6 '15 at 9:49
  • 1
    If you want to do this in pom.xml, check out baeldung.com/install-local-jar-with-maven – Kai Wang Nov 18 '15 at 19:54
  • @Kai Wang This solution works way better! you should maybe add this as an answer. – lockwobr Apr 13 '16 at 16:58
  • You should be using deploy and not install to create your repo correctly. – opticyclic Apr 27 '16 at 4:34
  • Here's a way to build up the local repo: mvn deploy -DaltDeploymentRepository=releaseRepository::default::file://${project.basedir}/repo – jcadcell Apr 25 '17 at 2:32

Create a new folder, let's say local-maven-repo at the root of your Maven project.

Just add a local repo inside your <project> of your pom.xml:

<repositories>
    <repository>
        <id>local-maven-repo</id>
        <url>file:///${project.basedir}/local-maven-repo</url>
    </repository>
</repositories>

Then for each external jar you want to install, go at the root of your project and execute:

mvn deploy:deploy-file -DgroupId=[GROUP] -DartifactId=[ARTIFACT] -Dversion=[VERS] -Durl=file:./local-maven-repo/ -DrepositoryId=local-maven-repo -DupdateReleaseInfo=true -Dfile=[FILE_PATH]
  • 8
    This is the only correct answer on here as it will create your repo correctly when using deploy. – opticyclic Apr 27 '16 at 4:33
  • 2
    This works a lot better than the accepted answer, because it does not mess up mvn package – Xeli Mar 21 '17 at 14:28
  • Would this approach work if the code is deployed using a CI build server? It looks like automated builds would not have access to the dependency. – Wallace Howery Mar 8 at 22:13
  • @user2748659 yes if in your CI build servers the folder local-maven-repo is included (as a child in this example) in your source folder – Anthony O. Mar 9 at 15:15
  • 2
    This answer is what worked for me. For a shared project, having the repo in the project directory and added to version control makes sure that anyone who checks out the project will not have missing dependencies. If you have a lot of dependencies, then a shared, remote repo is probably a better solution, otherwise keeping the repo in the project's directory is perfectly fine. – Aquarelle May 5 at 4:32
<dependency>
    <groupId>group id name</groupId>
    <artifactId>artifact name</artifactId>
    <version>version number</version>
    <scope>system</scope>
    <systemPath>jar location</systemPath>
</dependency>

I'd like such solution - use maven-install-plugin in pom file:

        <plugin>
            <groupId>org.apache.maven.plugins</groupId>
            <artifactId>maven-install-plugin</artifactId>
            <version>2.5.2</version>
            <executions>
                <execution>
                    <phase>initialize</phase>
                    <goals>
                        <goal>install-file</goal>
                    </goals>
                    <configuration>
                        <file>lib/yourJar.jar</file>
                        <groupId>com.somegroup.id</groupId>
                        <artifactId>artefact-id</artifactId>
                        <version>x.y.z</version>
                        <packaging>jar</packaging>
                    </configuration>
                </execution>
            </executions>
        </plugin>

In this case you can perform mvn initialize and jar will be installed in local maven repo. Now this jar is available during any maven step on this machine (do not forget to include this dependency as any other maven dependency in pom with <dependency></dependency> tag). It is also possible to bind jar install not to initialize step, but any other step you like.

  • 1
    This works well for me, but only if I run mvn initialize before mvn package: I cannot mvn initialize package or else it tries to download the JAR from the central repo. Why is this? I thought it would run this goals/phases in order. – DavidS Jan 17 '17 at 20:31
  • 1
    Actually, they should be run in order. Take a look at the list of default lifecycle: maven.apache.org/guides/introduction/… You can use another step to bind. – sphinks Jan 18 '17 at 6:47
  • 2
    I tried every method, but in the end I had to resort to this solution. The main reason is, I wanted to be able to locally build the packages in offline mode. If I declared it as a dependency with a locally defined repository, this was always considered as just another online repo and the maven build complained about not fining the artifact. This solution works fine for every case. – Mauli Dec 4 '17 at 11:27
  • 1
    I think is better to use clean phase because initialize will be executed each time when we use mvn package when Its unnecessary. Finally if we only need generate the jar/war we can use directly mvn clean package. – Deoxyseia Feb 3 at 0:07
  • "It is also possible to bind jar install not to initialize step, but any other step you like." is not necessarily true. If the dependency isn't in the repo yet and a phase is used that comes after a phase that resolves dependencies (e.g. compile) the build will fail. – Gerold Broser Feb 7 at 19:41

Yes , you can have but its not good idea.

Instead install all these jars to maven repos

Also See

One way is to upload it to your own Maven repository manager (such as Nexus). It's good practice to have an own repository manager anyway.

Another nice way I've recently seen is to include the Maven Install Plugin in your build lifecycle: You declare in the POM to install the files to the local repository. It's a little but small overhead and no manual step involved.

http://maven.apache.org/plugins/maven-install-plugin/install-file-mojo.html

  • 3
    End up with switching to gradle. It doesn't work If the local jar is defined as dependencies, maven will not execute plugins before resolving the dependencies, a manual installation is unavoidable. found a disscussion about this situation: stackoverflow.com/questions/5951999/… – xinthink Mar 15 '15 at 16:11

Add your own local JAR in POM file and use that in maven build.

mvn install:install-file -Dfile=path-to-jar -DgroupId=owngroupid -DartifactId=ownartifactid -Dversion=ownversion -Dpackaging=jar

For example:

mvn install:install-file -Dfile=path-to-jar -DgroupId=com.decompiler -DartifactId=jd-core-java -Dversion=1.2 -Dpackaging=jar

Then add it to the POM like this:

enter image description here

  • I get an error Failed to install artifact (access denied). How can I solve this? @Aurasphere – Ramzah Rehman Aug 4 '17 at 6:35
  • 1
    @RamzahRehman try opening the command prompt with admi privileges by right clicking it and then choosing "Run as administrator" – Aurasphere Aug 4 '17 at 7:44

Of course you can add jars to that folder. But maybe it does not what you want to achieve...

If you need these jars for compilation, check this related question: Can I add jars to maven 2 build classpath without installing them?

Also, before anyone suggests it, do NOT use the system scope.

command line :

mvn install:install-file -Dfile=c:\kaptcha-{version}.jar -DgroupId=com.google.code
-DartifactId=kaptcha -Dversion={version} -Dpackaging=jar

The really quick and dirty way is to point to a local file:

<dependency>
      <groupId>sample</groupId>  
       <artifactId>com.sample</artifactId>  
       <version>1.0</version> 
      <scope>system</scope>
      <systemPath>C:\DEV\myfunnylib\yourJar.jar</systemPath>
</dependency>

However this will only live on your machine (obviously), for sharing it usually makes sense to use a proper m2 archive (nexus/artifactory) or if you do not have any of these or don't want to set one up a local maven structured archive and configure a "repository" in your pom: local:

<repositories>
    <repository>
        <id>my-local-repo</id>
        <url>file://C:/DEV//mymvnrepo</url>
    </repository>
</repositories>

remote:

<repositories>
    <repository>
        <id>my-remote-repo</id>
        <url>http://192.168.0.1/whatever/mavenserver/youwant/repo</url>
    </repository>
</repositories>

for this a relative path is also possible using the basedir variable:

<url>file:${basedir}</url>
  • For local repository URLs, can they be relative or must they be absolute? – Dragas Oct 8 at 7:20
  • @Dragas I haven't tried, please let us know if you did. – fl0w Oct 8 at 7:34
  • 1
    Yeah, apparently you need to use <url>file:${basedir}</url> as base url instead. – Dragas Oct 8 at 8:30

The preferred way would be to create your own remote repository.

See here for details on how to do it. Have a look at the 'Uploading to a Remote Repository' section.

Another interesting case is when you want to have in your project private maven jars. You may want to keep the capabilities of Maven to resolve transitive dependencies. The solution is fairly easy.

  1. Create a folder libs in your project
  2. Add the following lines in your pom.xml file

    <properties><local.repository.folder>${pom.basedir}/libs/</local.repository.folder>
    </properties>
    
    <repositories>
       <repository>
            <id>local-maven-repository</id>
            <url>file://${local.repository.folder}</url>
            <releases>
                <enabled>true</enabled>
            </releases>
            <snapshots>
                <enabled>true</enabled>
            </snapshots>
       </repository>
    </repositories>
    
  3. Open the .m2/repository folder and copy the directory structure of the project you want to import into the libs folder.

E.g. suppose you want to import the dependency

<dependency>
    <groupId>com.mycompany.myproject</groupId>
    <artifactId>myproject</artifactId>
    <version>1.2.3</version>
</dependency>

Just go on .m2/repository and you will see the following folder

com/mycompany/myproject/1.2.3

Copy everything in your libs folder (again, including the folders under .m2/repository) and you are done.

Also take a look at...

<scope>compile</scope>

Maven Dependencies. This is the default but I've found in some cases explicitly setting that scope also Maven to find local libraries in the local repository.

I want to share a code where you can upload a folder full of jars. It's useful when a provider doesn't have a public repository and you need to add lots of libraries manually. I've decided to build a .bat instead of call directly to maven because It could be Out of Memory errors. It was prepared for a windows environment but is easy to adapt it to linux OS:

import java.io.File;
import java.io.IOException;
import java.io.PrintWriter;
import java.util.Date;
import java.util.jar.Attributes;
import java.util.jar.JarFile;
import java.util.jar.Manifest;

public class CreateMavenRepoApp {

    private static final String OCB_PLUGIN_FOLDER = "C://your_folder_with_jars";

    public static void main(String[] args) throws IOException {

    File directory = new File();
    //get all the files from a directory
    PrintWriter writer = new PrintWriter("update_repo_maven.bat", "UTF-8");
    writer.println("rem "+ new Date());  
    File[] fList = directory.listFiles();
    for (File file : fList){
        if (file.isFile()){               
        String absolutePath = file.getAbsolutePath() ;
        Manifest  m = new JarFile(absolutePath).getManifest();
        Attributes attributes = m.getMainAttributes();
        String symbolicName = attributes.getValue("Bundle-SymbolicName");

        if(symbolicName!=null &&symbolicName.contains("com.yourCompany.yourProject")) {
            String[] parts =symbolicName.split("\\.");
            String artifactId = parts[parts.length-1];
            String groupId = symbolicName.substring(0,symbolicName.length()-artifactId.length()-1);
            String version = attributes.getValue("Bundle-Version");
            String mavenLine= "call mvn org.apache.maven.plugins:maven-install-plugin:2.5.1:install-file -Dfile="+ absolutePath+" -DgroupId="+ groupId+" -DartifactId="+ artifactId+" -Dversion="+ version+" -Dpackaging=jar ";
            writer.println(mavenLine);          
        }

        }
    }
    writer.close();
    }

}

After run this main from any IDE, run the update_repo_maven.bat.

  • Your code String symbolicName = attributes.getValue("Bundle-SymbolicName"); if(symbolicName!=null &&symbolicName.contains("com.yourCompany.yourProject")) seems to indicate that only custom jars will be supported. That's not what we need: instead a bunch of third party jars. Do you have suggestions how to install any jar this way? – javadba Nov 27 '16 at 20:03
  • I have fixed your code: i put an answer at the bottom. – javadba Nov 27 '16 at 20:08

This is a short syntax for newer versions:

mvn install:install-file -Dfile=<path-to-file>

It works when the JAR was built by Apache Maven - the most common case. Then it'll contain a pom.xml in a subfolder of the META-INF directory, which will be read by default.

Source: http://maven.apache.org/guides/mini/guide-3rd-party-jars-local.html

Note that it is NOT necessarily a good idea to use a local repo. If this project is shared with others then everyone else will have problems and questions when it doesn't work, and the jar won't be available even in your source control system!

Although the shared repo is the best answer, if you cannot do this for some reason then embedding the jar is better than a local repo. Local-only repo contents can cause lots of problems, especially over time.

  • 1
    if you add the jars in the source control system the libraries will always be available together with the source. No source, No libraries. With maven instead the source might be ok but the repository unavailable. – sarah.ferguson Dec 9 '15 at 14:34
  • @Frank... any idea about how to create executable jar without including external dependencies(library files)? – Satish Karuturi Jan 9 '16 at 8:56
  • For someone new to maven, and looking for an answer to the original question, what does "embedding the jar" mean? – cdock Feb 11 '17 at 16:09

On your local repository you can install your jar by issuing the commands

 mvn install:install-file -Dfile=<path-to-file> -DgroupId=<group-id> \
-DartifactId=<artifact-id> -Dversion=<version> -Dpackaging=<packaging>

Follow this useful link to do the same from mkyoung's website. You can also check maven guide for the same

  • How is this answer any different than the previously accepted answer? – cdock Feb 11 '17 at 16:08

For some reason, in the web application I'm giving maintenance to, neither Alireza Fattahi's solution nor JJ Roman's solution worked correctly. In both cases, the compilation goes okay (it sees the jar), but the packaging fails to include the jar inside the war.

The only way I managed to make it work was by putting the jar on /src/main/webapp/WEB-INF/lib/ and then combining it with either Fattahis's or Roman's solution.

THIS ANSWER IS ONLY FOR ECLIPSE USERS:

If you are using Eclipse, place the jar in lib/, right click on the jar name and click "add to build path". Eclipse will create a "referenced libraries" and place the jar for you

It resolved the import of the jar right away in the program for me

  • 2
    That will add entry into Eclipse's .classpath, but your maven build mvn package will be brocket once you start using that dependency, as maven has no definition of it, and it should be only in pom.xml – Paul Verest Jul 25 '17 at 15:10

To install third party jar, Please call the command like below

mvn install:install-file -DgroupId= -DartifactId= -Dversion= -Dpackaging=jar -Dfile=path

I had the same error for a set of dependencies in my pom.xml turns out the versions of the dependencies was not specified in the pom.xml and was mentioned in the parent repository. For some reason the version details was not syncing with this repo. Hence i manually entered the versions using the tag and it worked like a charm. Little bit of time needed to look up the versions in the parent and specify here. But this can be done just for the jars that are showing the artifactid error and it works. Hope this helps someone.

I think a better solution for this problem is to use maven-install-plugin to automatically install the files at install time. This is how I set it up for my project.

First, add the path (where you store the local .jars) as a property.

<properties>
    <local.sdk>/path/to/jar</local.sdk>
</properties>

Then, under plugins add a plugin to install the jars when compiling.

<plugin>
    <groupId>org.apache.maven.plugins</groupId>
    <artifactId>maven-install-plugin</artifactId>
    <version>2.5.2</version>
    <executions>
        <execution>
            <id>1</id>
            <phase>initialize</phase>
            <goals>
                <goal>install-file</goal>
            </goals>
            <configuration>
                <groupId>com.local.jar</groupId> 
                <artifactId>appengine-api</artifactId>
                <version>1.0</version>
                <packaging>jar</packaging>
                <file>${local.sdk}/lib/impl/appengine-api.jar</file>
            </configuration>
        </execution>
        <execution>
            <id>appengine-api-stubs</id>
            <phase>initialize</phase>
            <goals>
                <goal>install-file</goal>
            </goals>
            <configuration>
                <groupId>com.local.jar</groupId>
                <artifactId>appengine-api-stubs</artifactId>
                <version>1.0</version>
                <packaging>jar</packaging>
                <file>${local.sdk}/lib/impl/appengine-api-stubs.jar</file>
            </configuration>
        </execution>
    </executions>
</plugin>

Finally, in dependencies, you can add the jars

<dependency>
    <groupId>com.local.jar</groupId>
    <artifactId>appengine-api</artifactId>
    <version>1.0</version>
</dependency>

<dependency>
    <groupId>com.local.jar</groupId>
    <artifactId>appengine-api-stubs</artifactId>
    <version>1.0</version>
    <scope>test</scope>
</dependency>

By Setting up your project like this, the project will continue to build even when you take it to another computer (given that it has all the jar files in the path specified by the property local.sdk).

For groupId use a unique name just to make sure that there are no conflicts.

Now when you mvn install or mvn test local jars will be added automatically.

  1. mvn install

You can write code below in command line or if you're using eclipse builtin maven right click on project -> Run As -> run configurations... -> in left panel right click on Maven Build -> new configuration -> write the code in Goals & in base directory :${project_loc:NameOfYourProject} -> Run

mvn install:install-file
   -Dfile=<path-to-file>
   -DgroupId=<group-id>
   -DartifactId=<artifact-id>
   -Dversion=<version>
   -Dpackaging=<packaging>
   -DgeneratePom=true

Where each refers to:

< path-to-file >: the path to the file to load e.g -> c:\kaptcha-2.3.jar

< group-id >: the group that the file should be registered under e.g -> com.google.code

< artifact-id >: the artifact name for the file e.g -> kaptcha

< version >: the version of the file e.g -> 2.3

< packaging >: the packaging of the file e.g. -> jar

2.After installed, just declares jar in pom.xml.

 <dependency>
      <groupId>com.google.code</groupId>
      <artifactId>kaptcha</artifactId>
      <version>2.3</version>
 </dependency>

In Apache Maven 3.5.4, I had to add double quotation. Without double quotation it wasn't worked for me.

example: mvn install:install-file "-Dfile=location to the jar file" "-DgroupId=group id" "-DartifactId=artifact id" "-Dversion=version" "-Dpackaging=package type"

I had the same problem with ojdbc6. I saw this link but, it did'nt work. The command was correct but I needed one parameter more,

This is the link: http://roufid.com/3-ways-to-add-local-jar-to-maven-project/

Here is the example:

install:install-file -Dfile=C:\driversDB\ojdbc6.jar -DgroupId=com.oracle -DartifactId=ojdbc6 -Dversion=11.2.0.3 -Dpackaging=jar

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