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Actually I have a database that stores customer sensitive informations. I'm using something like that to encrypt that data:

$algo  = 'AES-256-CTR';
$key ='password md5 from bdd'
$iv   = substr(hash('sha256',$email),0,openssl_cipher_iv_length($algo));

$data = base64_encode($data);
$data = openssl_encrypt($data,$algo,$key,OPENSSL_RAW_DATA,$iv);

As you see I'm using the customer's email to create the iv and his password md5 for the key. So if someone hack my bdd he can decrypt the sensitive data. Is there a better way to do, knowing that my php script needs to be able to decrypt the data for use

My ideas:

-Use a executable on the server that create/modify the password and/or the iv and does the decryption and that the php script calls for that.

-Use a second server that stores the passwords and that the php script needs to call for decryption.

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    If someone has access to both your db and your source code (which is really the only way they'd know how to reverse-engineer the 'sensitive data', right), then I'd say you're pretty much boned no matter what. – Patrick Q Mar 30 '18 at 16:38
  • @PatrickQ thats usually how I approach it. If they get both, its over, because it means they are all over the server. Game over man, Game over! – IncredibleHat Mar 30 '18 at 17:23
  • You seem to say that code is not "findable" ? If it is, adding an second server to store the passwords and doing the data decryption should be profitable ? – Entretoize Mar 30 '18 at 17:26
  • If someone got into the server to get the database files directly, they can get the website source code as well. However if someone simply got the content of the database (sql injection attacks, other db holes), then they don't necessarily have access to the source code. Hacking into a server is generally more difficult than dumping the content of a database through poor use of canned-open-source code libraries etc. – IncredibleHat Mar 30 '18 at 17:31
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    The counter needs a starting random value, there key and counter starting value combination must never be reused. When passwords are used the key should;d be derived with a function that includes iteration such as PBKDF2. Simply using MD5 is not secure. – zaph Mar 30 '18 at 17:40
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I suggest you to use Argon2 to derivate $key from user's password, then use Symmetric Encryption like AES, or XSalsa20 or XChacha20 to encrypt it, alternatively you can use other derivation functions that make brute force impractical, just take care that salt is never reused, take a look at 🗄 Vault, and libsodium-php

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As you see I'm using the customer's email to create the iv and his password md5 for the key.

A few things you may nees to be aware of

  • IV suppose to be unique for CTR mode, but as already pointed out, it is static (derived from email).
  • it is possible to find md5 collision in a minute on commodity hw (newest tunelling method)
  • you are missing any authentication tag.

Common practice for encryption is having random IV, encrypted source and MAC as part of the ciphertext (e. g. iv.encrypted.mac)

imho creating a key from password md5 may be feasible assuming you don't store the keys, so there is nothing to find a collision against and the passwords are having high entropy (are long and random)

So if someone hack my bdd he can decrypt the sensitive data. Is there a better way to do, knowing that my php script needs to be able to decrypt the data for use

it is generally a problem storing system credentials. you may use a credential vault, but you need to store the vault credentials somewhere. you can encrypt the system credentials, but you need to store the decryption key somewhere. Ay least hide the credentials from plain sight so it makes more difficult for automated hacking tools or not so dedicated adversaries.

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