10

Consider following trivial app:

<div id="app">
  <counters :counter1="counter1" :counter2="counter2">
  </counters>
  <button @click="onClick">Click Here</button>
</div>

JS:

Vue.component('counters', {
  template: '<h1>{{counter1.count}} {{counter2.count}}</h1>',
  //template: '<h1>{{count1}} {{count2}}</h1>',
  props: {
    'counter1': {
      type: Object
    },
    'counter2': {
      type: Object
    }
  },
  data: function() {
    return {
      'count1': 0,
      'count2': 0,
    }
  },
  watch: {
    counter1: function(n, o) {
      console.log(JSON.stringify(n));
      this.count1 = n.count;
    },
    counter2: function(n, o) {
      console.log(JSON.stringify(n));
      this.count2 = n.count;
    }
  }
});


var vm = new Vue({
  el: '#app',
  data: {
    counter1: {
      count: 0
    },
    counter2: {
      count: 0
    }
  },
  methods: {
    onClick: function() {
      this.counter1.count++;
      this.counter2.count++;
    }
  }
});

"counters" expects two props counter1 and counter2 , both objects. The properties counter1.count and counter2.count are used directly in template. On clicking the button both counters are incremented by one. This works flawlessly as can be seen here: jsfiddle

However I wanted to use "watch" for updating the counters. So I defined reactive properties count1 and count2 and updated them whenever counter1 and counter2 changed. For some reason this does not work. I was under impression both approaches should yield the same result although using watch is less efficient. But probably I am missing something here. Can you explain?

3 Answers 3

33

If you want to watch for changes on an object you will need to use a deep watcher:

watch: {
  counter1: {
    handler(n, o) {
      this.count1 = n.count;
    },
    deep: true
  },
  counter2: {
    handler(n, o) {
      this.count2 = n.count;
    },
    deep: true
  }
}

Here's the JSFiddle: https://jsfiddle.net/osyam658/

Alternatively you may watch the object property itself, by wrapping the property name in quotes in the watcher:

  watch: {
    'counter1.count': function(n, o) {
      this.count1 = n;
    },
    'counter2.count': function(n, o) {
      this.count2 = n;
    }
  }

Here's the JSFiddle for that: https://jsfiddle.net/b7drpy7j/

2
  • But both n and o in the handler have the same value. That is unexpected. How to get the old value?
    – kargirwar
    Mar 31, 2018 at 12:05
  • 1
    @kirgirwar Yes, that's expected behaviour because they both reference the same object. If you need to keep a copy of the old object you will need to handle that yourself: jsfiddle.net/ukkumoda
    – craig_h
    Mar 31, 2018 at 12:20
1

You need to setup up a deep watcher to observe changes nested inside objects as follows:

watch: {
  counter1: {
    handler: function(n, o) {
      console.log(JSON.stringify(n));
      this.count1 = n.count;
    },
    deep: true  
  },
  counter2: 
    handler: function(n, o) {
      console.log(JSON.stringify(n));
      this.count2 = n.count;
    },
    deep: true
  }
}

Here is the updated fiddle

Reference: deep option for vm.$watch()

0

For me need to inizialize the local val with props in sections created and mounted, for example:

Vue.component('counters', {
  template: '<h1>{{counter}} {{count}}</h1>',

  props: ['counter'],

  data: function() {
    return {
      'count': null,
    }
  },
  watch: {
    counter: function(n, o) {
      this.count = n;
    },
  },
  created () {
    this.count = this.counter;
  },
  mounted () {
    this.count = this.counter;
  }
});

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