I'm trying to solve an non-linear optimization problem by nlopt c++ library. But the result seems different from the matlab. The optimition problem is as follows:

I have serval intersected lines in the 3-D coordinate $l_i(x, y, z)$. And I want to find a point $(x_0, y_0, z_0)$ that minimize the distance from the point to all these lines. That is, ... The detail discription of the problem is in the picture.

#include <nlopt.hpp>
#include <math.h>
#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

struct Point {
    double x;
    double y;
    double z;

    Point() : x(0.0), y(0.0), z(0.0) {}
    Point(double x_, double y_, double z_) :
        x(x_), y(y_), z(z_) {}
};
Point operator-(const Point &p1, const Point &p2)
{
    Point p;
    p.x = p1.x - p2.x;
    p.y = p1.y - p2.y;
    p.z = p1.z - p2.z;
    return p;
}
double operator*(const Point &p1, const Point &p2)
{
    double ret = 0.0;
    ret += (p1.x * p2.x + p1.y * p2.y + p1.z * p2.z);
    return ret;
}
struct Line {
    Point p1;
    Point p2;

    Line(const Point& p1_, const Point& p2_):
        p1(p1_), p2(p2_) {}
};
int aux_calcu_func(const std::vector<double> &x,
    const std::vector<Line> &lines,
    double &obj, std::vector<double> &grad)
{
    Point pCenter(x[0], x[1], x[2]);

    // object function value
    obj = 0.0;
    for (size_t i = 0; i < lines.size(); ++i)
    {
        Line line = lines[i];
        Point pA = line.p1;
        Point pB = line.p2;
        Point vAC = pCenter - pA;
        Point vAB = pB - pA;
        obj += (vAC * vAC - (vAC * vAB) * (vAC * vAB) / (vAB * vAB));
    }
    // gradient
    if (!grad.empty())
    {
        for (size_t i = 0; i < lines.size(); ++i)
        {
            Line line = lines[i];
            Point pA = line.p1;
            Point pB = line.p2;
            Point vAC = pCenter - pA;
            Point vAB = pB - pA;
            grad[0] += (2 * (vAC.x - (vAC * vAB * vAB.x / (vAB * vAB))));
            grad[1] += (2 * (vAC.y - (vAC * vAB * vAB.y / (vAB * vAB))));
            grad[2] += (2 * (vAC.z - (vAC * vAB * vAB.z / (vAB * vAB))));
        }
    }

    return 0;
}
double my_func(const std::vector<double> &x, std::vector<double> &grad,
    void *my_func_data)
{
    Line *lines = reinterpret_cast<Line*>(my_func_data);
    std::vector<Line> linesVec(lines, lines + 3);

    double ret = 0.0;
    if (0 != aux_calcu_func(x, linesVec, ret, grad))
    {
        throw "object function or gradient error!";
    }

    return ret;
}
int main(void)
{
    // 3 lines
    Line lines[3] = { { {0.6938, 2.0, 1.1678}, {0.6938, -2.0, 1.1811} },
                  { {0.8723, 2.0, -0.8626},{0.8723, -2.0, 3.0110} },
                  { {0.6080, 2.0, 0.4689}, {0.6080, -2.0, 0.5310} }
    };

    nlopt::opt opt(nlopt::LN_COBYLA, 3);
    opt.set_min_objective(my_func, lines);
    opt.set_xtol(1e-4);
    std::vector<double> x(3);
    x[0] = 0.0; x[1] = 0.0; x[2] = 0.0;
    double minf = 0.0;
    nlopt::result ret = opt.optimize(x, minf);
    /* expected x = {1.0283, 0.7247, 0.3419},
     * actually x = {0.7247, 0.2361, 0.8372}
     */

    return 0;
}
  • 1
    why did you choose Cobyla? That does not make sense to me. – Erwin Kalvelagen Apr 1 at 11:50

Interestingly this problem can be efficiently solved as an SOCP (Second Order Cone Programming) problem. No need for derivatives, or initial points, and proven global solutions. Basically the model looks like:

enter image description here

With some random data:

enter image description here

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