11

This is the test:

import static junit.framework.Assert.assertTrue;
import static org.powermock.api.mockito.PowerMockito.mock;
import static org.powermock.api.mockito.PowerMockito.whenNew;

import org.junit.Test;
import org.junit.runner.RunWith;
import org.powermock.core.classloader.annotations.PrepareForTest;
import org.powermock.modules.junit4.PowerMockRunner;

@RunWith(PowerMockRunner.class)
@PrepareForTest( {ClassUnderTesting.class} )
public class ClassUnderTestingTest {

    @Test
    public void shouldInitializeMocks() throws Exception {
        CollaboratorToBeMocked mockedCollaborator = mock(CollaboratorToBeMocked.class);

            suppress(constructor(CollaboratorToBeMocked.class, InjectedIntoCollaborator.class));

        whenNew(CollaboratorToBeMocked.class)
            .withArguments(InjectedAsTypeIntoCollaborator.class)
            .thenReturn(mockedCollaborator);

        new ClassUnderTesting().methodUnderTesting();

        assertTrue(true);
    }
}

These are the classes :

public class ClassUnderTesting {

    public void methodUnderTesting() {
        new CollaboratorToBeMocked(InjectedAsTypeIntoCollaborator.class);
    }

}

public class CollaboratorToBeMocked {

    public CollaboratorToBeMocked(Class<InjectedAsTypeIntoCollaborator> clazz) {
    }

    public CollaboratorToBeMocked(InjectedIntoCollaborator someCollaborator) {
    }

    public CollaboratorToBeMocked() {
    }

}

public class InjectedAsTypeIntoCollaborator {

}

public class InjectedIntoCollaborator {

}

This is the error :

org.powermock.reflect.exceptions.TooManyConstructorsFoundException: Several matching constructors found, please specify the argument parameter types so that PowerMock can determine which method you're refering to.
Matching constructors in class CollaboratorToBeMocked were:
CollaboratorToBeMocked( InjectedIntoCollaborator.class )
CollaboratorToBeMocked( java.lang.Class.class )

Here comes the question: how can I make PowerMock figure out what constructor to look for?

The problematic line is the suppress. That is where the error comes from.

  • 1
    What happens when you remove the CollaboratorToBeMocked( java.lang.Class.class ) constructor? Does it work then? – David Weiser Feb 10 '11 at 16:07
  • you mean, when i remove the other constructor... yes, if i remove the constructor with InjectedIntoCollaborator, it works – Belun Feb 10 '11 at 16:09
17

Perhaps it is too late for your question. I met it today and found the solution at the following url. Basically, you need to specify your argument type like.

whenNew(MimeMessage.class).**withParameterTypes(MyParameterType.class)**.withArguments(isA(MyParameter.class)).thenReturn(mimeMessageMock); 

http://groups.google.com/group/powermock/msg/347f6ef1fb34d946?pli=1

Hope it can help you. :)

  • 1
    This answer worked for me. I had a situation with the ResponseEntity class which has a generic T. public ResponseEntity(MultiValueMap<String, String> headers, HttpStatus statusCode) public ResponseEntity(T body, HttpStatus statusCode) If you use the syntax: PowerMockito.whenNew(ResponseEntity.class).withArguments(headers, statusCode).thenReturn(responseEntity); it doesn't work, but PowerMockito.whenNew(ResponseEntity.class).withParameterTypes(MultiValueMap.class, HttpStatus.class).withArguments(headers, statusCode).thenReturn(responseEntity); works – gaoagong Jun 27 '14 at 20:49
2

I didn't know of PowerMock until you wrote your question, but did some reading and found this in their documentation. Still I am not really sure if that helps you:

If the super class have several constructors it's possible to tell PowerMock to only suppress a specific one. Let's say you have a class called ClassWithSeveralConstructors that has one constructor that takes a String and another constructor that takes an int as an argument and you only want to suppress the String constructor. You can do this using the suppress(constructor(ClassWithSeveralConstructors.class, String.class)); method.

found at http://code.google.com/p/powermock/wiki/SuppressUnwantedBehavior

Isn't it the thing you wanted?

EDIT: Now I see, you've already tried suppressing. But are you sure you got the suppress call right? Isn't the first argument of constructor() supposed to be the class you would like to surpress the constructor in?

  • you're right. my supress is a mess. nevertheless, it still does not work i used suppress(constructor(CollaboratorToBeMocked.class, InjectedIntoCollaborator.class)); – Belun Feb 11 '11 at 8:55
  • um, my test was bad. once i fixed the test class, the test went green. so, the problem is, now, the supress. might be a bug... – Belun Feb 11 '11 at 9:32
  • If you have a complete example and still fail to see the expected outcome, I should definitely file a bug report to the project. – Grzegorz Oledzki Feb 14 '11 at 17:24

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