2

I am learning lambda expression in C++. I found the below code at https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/cpp/cpp/lambda-expressions-in-cpp

     #include <iostream>  
     using namespace std;  

     int main()  
     {  
          int m = 0;  
          int n = 0;  
          [&, n] (int a) mutable { m = ++n + a; }(4);  
          cout << m << endl << n << endl;  
     }

The output: 5 0

I cannot understand (4) at the line of lambda expression. What does this (4) means and how it is used in the lambda expression?

1
  • The 4 is passed as an argument to the lambda function. Inside the function, it is represented by a. – Sid S Apr 1 '18 at 8:22
2

This is somewhat similar to

int m = 0;
int n = 0;

void f(int a)
{
    m = n + 1 + a;
}

int main()
{
    f(4);
}
0
2

The expression [&, n] (int a) mutable { m = ++n + a; } creates a temporary callable object. The (4) part is simply "calling" that object, passing 4 as the argument.

The whole expression [&, n] (int a) mutable { m = ++n + a; }(4) is roughly equivalent to

auto temporary_function_object = [&, n] (int a) mutable { m = ++n + a; };
temporary_function_object(4);
1

Here's the simplified code. Variable m will be captured by reference and variable n will be captured by value in the lambda.

Since it is declared mutable variable n will not be affected outside the lambda. Hence you get 5 and 0 for m and n. If you use [=] it will print 0 0

 #include <iostream>  
 using namespace std;  

 int main()  
 {  
      int m = 0;  
      int n = 0;  
      auto func = [&, n] (int a) mutable { m = ++n + a; };  
      func(4);
      cout << m << endl << n << endl;  
 }

So.

  auto func =[]() { cout << " Hello \n"; }; // this is similar to func definition
   func(); // call here to execute

Or you can directly call like this :

[]() { cout << " Hello \n"; }();
0

If your fundamentals are clear about Lambda then it would be simpler for you like

[&, n] (int a) mutable { m = ++n + a; }(4);  
  1. capture list i.e [&,n] suggest capturing everything as reference & n as value.
  2. (int a) represent argument list.
  3. mutable keyword suggest you can mutate captured value of n withing closure. In other words, this pointer would be mutable.
  4. (4); at the end calls the lambda function with passing argument 4.

I have written one article on the same -> Lambda function in C++ with example. If you have time you can consider it.

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