Is there a way to generate a random number in a specified range (e.g. from 1 to 6: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, or 6) in JavaScript?

18 Answers 18

up vote 1680 down vote accepted

If you wanted to get between 1 and 6, you would calculate:

Math.floor(Math.random() * 6) + 1  

Where:

  • 1 is the start number
  • 6 is the number of possible results (1 + start (6) - end (1))
  • 33
    While this would work, @Mike, it would be best to point out the more generic version as Francisc has it below :-). – Raymond Machira Aug 5 '13 at 14:38
  • 48
    -1. After Googling I found this question the title is ""Generate random value between two numbers in Javascript"." Won't work if the min value is 0 – Ydhem Oct 8 '13 at 1:44
  • 12
    Doesn't work if you want a number between two larger numbers eg. Math.floor(Math.random() * 900) + 700 – Rob Nov 25 '13 at 16:12
  • 11
    That only works if the minimum is 1. If the min is 2 and we still use Math.floor(Math.random() * 6) + 2 means that if Math.random() results into 0.99 our random value would be 7 – antitoxic Dec 12 '13 at 16:15
  • 20
    This code not good because, does not work with any number. @Francisc code is the correct. – Lion King Dec 22 '13 at 14:39
function randomIntFromInterval(min,max) // min and max included
{
    return Math.floor(Math.random()*(max-min+1)+min);
}

What it does "extra" is it allows random intervals that do not start with 1. So you can get a random number from 10 to 15 for example. Flexibility.

  • 4
    this is also great because if someone doesn't include the to arg, the from arg doubles as the max – Jason Feb 6 '13 at 1:53
  • 7
    Hello. This is from MDN: Returns a floating-point, pseudo-random number in the range [0, 1) that is, from 0 (inclusive) up to but not including 1 (exclusive), which you can then scale to your desired range. (developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/JavaScript/Reference/…) – Francisc Apr 9 '13 at 20:12
  • 3
    Read the above comment. Random is inside [0,1), not [0,1]. – Francisc Jun 21 '13 at 13:41
  • 1
    Works great if the lower number is 0. – Robin Zimmermann Oct 27 '13 at 20:47
  • 2
    Note that this solution is correct only if min and max are integers, otherwise you can get a result in the interval [min, ceil(max)]. I.e. you can get a result which is out of range because is higher than max. – collimarco Jul 7 '14 at 9:40

Math.random()

From the Mozilla Developer Network documentation:

// Returns a random integer between min (include) and max (include)

Math.floor(Math.random() * (max - min + 1)) + min;

Useful examples:

// 0 -> 10
Math.floor(Math.random() * 11);

// 1 -> 10
Math.floor(Math.random() * 10) + 1;

// 5 -> 20
Math.floor(Math.random() * 16) + 5;

// -10 -> (-2)
Math.floor(Math.random() * 9) - 10;
  • Something that confused me... the Math.floor(..) ensures that the number is an integer where Math.round(..) would give an uneven distribution. Ref: developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/… – alikuli Aug 3 '16 at 10:45
  • 1
    I trust this answer. Can anyone give a link or clear explanation of why this works? Perhaps an example of how Math.round would give a bias, and why that means we have to use this rather complex-seeming formula? – Robin Oct 11 '16 at 9:05
  • 5
    @alikuli For a range of [1,2], there is 25% chance Math.random() would give you a number from one of these [0,0.49], [0.5,0.99], [1,1.49], [1.5,1.99]. Rounding those intervals would result in 0, 1, 1, 2 which is not an even distribution. Flooring them results in 0, 0, 1, 1. – destoryer Mar 30 '17 at 22:24
  • 1
    @shuji This is, among others, the correct answer. I just wanted to clarify why using Math.round over Math.floor would give different results. – destoryer Nov 20 '17 at 13:23

Other solutions:

  • (Math.random() * 6 | 0) + 1
  • ~~(Math.random() * 6) + 1
  • 5
    would you mind explaining (or giving references to) the ~~ sintaxis? I haven't seen it before! Elegant solution but hard to understand. – DiegoDD May 31 '13 at 22:49
  • 21
    Double Tilde ~~a and Bitwise OR (a | 0) are faster ways to write Math.floor(a) – edi9999 Jul 18 '13 at 15:39
  • 4
    a | 0 is also the fastest and most optimized way to convert a string to an integer. It only works with strings containing integers ("444" and "-444"), i.e. no floats/fractions. It yields a 0 for everything that fails. It is one of the main optimizations behind asm.js. – pilau Nov 21 '14 at 7:35
  • 1
    @edi9999 faster to write, but faster to execute as well? – csguimaraes Sep 26 '15 at 18:49
  • 1
    Note: if you are working with some really large numbers the double tilde is not going to work. Try ~~(Math.random() * (50000000000000 - 0 + 1)) + 0 and Math.floor(Math.random() * (50000000000000 - 0 + 1)) + 0 – BrunoLM May 25 '16 at 23:50

TL;DR

function generateRandomInteger(min, max) {
  return Math.floor(min + Math.random()*(max + 1 - min))
}

To get the random number generateRandomInteger(-20, 20);

EXPLANATION BELOW

We need to get a random integer, say X between min and max.

Right?

i.e min <= X <= max

If we subtract min from the equation, this is equivalent to

0 <= (X - min) <= (max - min)

Now, lets multiply this with a random number r which is

0 <= (X - min) * r <= (max - min) * r

Now, lets add back min to the equation

min <= min + (X - min) * r <= min + (max - min) * r

Now, lets chose a function which results in r such that it satisfies our equation range as [min,max]. This is only possible if 0<= r <=1

OK. Now, the range of r i.e [0,1] is very similar to Math.random() function result. Isn't it?

The Math.random() function returns a floating-point, pseudo-random number in the range [0, 1); that is, from 0 (inclusive) up to but not including 1 (exclusive)

For example,

Case r = 0

min + 0 * (max-min) = min

Case r = 1

min + 1 * (max-min) = max

Random Case using Math.random 0 <= r < 1

min + r * (max-min) = X, where X has range of min <= X < max

The above result X is a random numeric. However due to Math.random() our left bound is inclusive, and the right bound is exclusive. To include our right bound we increase the right bound by 1 and floor the result.

function generateRandomInteger(min, max) {
  return Math.floor(min + Math.random()*(max + 1 - min))
}

To get the random number

generateRandomInteger(-20, 20);

jsfiddle: https://jsfiddle.net/cyGwf/477/

Random Integer: to get a random integer between min and max, use the following code

function getRandomInteger(min, max) {
  min = Math.ceil(min);
  max = Math.floor(max);
  return Math.floor(Math.random() * (max - min)) + min;
}

Random Floating Point Number: to get a random floating point number between min and max, use the following code

function getRandomFloat(min, max) {
  return Math.random() * (max - min) + min;
}

Reference: https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/Math/random

var x = 6; // can be any number
var rand = Math.floor(Math.random()*x) + 1;
  • 2
    Indeed. I forgot rand was 0 inclusive. Fixed it. – ryebr3ad Feb 10 '11 at 16:56
  • 3
    That's part Pseudocode... someone might think it is real and try to use it like that. – gravityboy Feb 10 '11 at 18:23
  • 32
    @gravityboy What are you talking about? If someone can't substitute a number for [pick a number...], they might not be suitable as a programmer. – ryebr3ad Feb 10 '11 at 18:53
  • 7
    @ryebr3ad -1! it's said in javascript not in pseudo code and also not all readers are accomplished programmers. Many are beginners! – Steve Oct 21 '12 at 19:29
  • 2
    @ryebr3ad: I've had a co-worker that was teaching interns about a database environment they would need support. He told them to select everything out of a table and they started writing "select everything out of..." right in the SQL query editor. He had the same reaction you did. – Ellesedil Aug 21 '15 at 20:26

Or, in Underscore

_.random(min, max)

Math is not my strong point, but I've been working on a project where I needed to generate a lot of random numbers between both positive and negative.

function randomBetween(min, max) {
    if (min < 0) {
        return min + Math.random() * (Math.abs(min)+max);
    }else {
        return min + Math.random() * max;
    }
}

E.g

randomBetween(-10,15)//or..
randomBetween(10,20)//or...
randomBetween(-200,-100)

Of course, you can also add some validation to make sure you don't do this with anything other than numbers. Also make sure that min is always less than or equal to max.

  • 4
    This is simply wrong. min + Math.random() * max will give you numbers between min and min+max, which is not what you want. The first branch of the if is correct, but could be simplified to say return min + Math.random() * (max - min), which is the correct solution regardless of whether min is positive or negative (see the other answers). Also, keep in mind that you still need to floor the result if you don't want fractions. – Avish May 23 '13 at 16:09
  • 11
    he said math is not his strong point! ;) – Enrico Aug 6 '13 at 8:30

I wrote more flexible function which can give you random number but not only integer.

function rand(min,max,interval)
{
    if (typeof(interval)==='undefined') interval = 1;
    var r = Math.floor(Math.random()*(max-min+interval)/interval);
    return r*interval+min;
}

var a = rand(0,10); //can be 0, 1, 2 (...) 9, 10
var b = rand(4,6,0.1); //can be 4.0, 4.1, 4.2 (...) 5.9, 6.0

Fixed version.

  • This is not a good solution as it won't work with zero as min value. See @Lior's answer. – Sebastien Sep 11 '15 at 9:45
  • Of course it works with zero as min value. Did you try? There is no reason why it might not work. It won't work with 0 as interval which isn't strange (interval = 0?...). – ElChupacabra Sep 14 '15 at 10:01
  • I ran multiple times this function with zero as min value and never obtained zero in the output. Or I'm not lucky enough... – Sebastien Sep 14 '15 at 10:11
  • You are right. "+interval" was in wrong place. Test it now please. Strange thing that sometimes console.log gives me 0.300000004 instead of 0.3 like 3*0.1 wouldn't be exactly 0.3. – ElChupacabra Sep 14 '15 at 10:40

Example

Return a random number between 1 and 10:

Math.floor((Math.random() * 10) + 1);

The result could be: 3

Try yourself: here

--

or using lodash / undescore:

_.random(min, max)

Docs: - lodash - undescore

  • How do I code it so it's either 9 or 10? – Si8 Aug 1 at 13:44
  • 1
    so you need 9 or 10 right? If yes: const randomNumber = Math.floor((Math.random() * 10) + 1) const nineOrTen = randomNumber % 2 === 0 ? 9 : 10 – Sebastián Lara Aug 2 at 14:20
  • Thank you. That was helpful enough :) +1 – Si8 Aug 2 at 15:25

I was searching random number generator written in TypeScript and I have written this after reading all of the answers, hope It would work for TypeScript coders.

    Rand(min: number, max: number): number {
        return (Math.random() * (max - min + 1) | 0) + min;
    }   

Inspite of many answers and almost same result. I would like to add my answer and explain its working. Because it is important to understand its working rather than copy pasting one line code. Generating random numbers is nothing but simple maths.

CODE:

function getR(lower, upper) {

  var percent = (Math.random() * 100);
  // this will return number between 0-99 because Math.random returns decimal number from 0-0.9929292 something like that
  //now you have a percentage, use it find out the number between your INTERVAL :upper-lower 
  var num = ((percent * (upper - lower) / 100));
  //num will now have a number that falls in your INTERVAL simple maths
  num += lower;
  //add lower to make it fall in your INTERVAL
  //but num is still in decimal
  //use Math.floor>downward to its nearest integer you won't get upper value ever
  //use Math.ceil>upward to its nearest integer upper value is possible
  //Math.round>to its nearest integer 2.4>2 2.5>3   both lower and upper value possible
  console.log(Math.floor(num), Math.ceil(num), Math.round(num));
}

Sense you need to add 1 to the max number, and then subtract the minimum number for any of this to work, and I need to make a lot of random Integers, this function works.

var random = function(max, min) {
    high++;
    return Math.floor((Math.random()) * (max - min)) + min;
};

This works with both negative, and positive numbers, and I'm working on decimals for a library.

  • One crucial mistake. You need to add + 1 in order to get absolute range number. return Math.floor((Math.random()) * (max - min + 1)) + min; – Volkan Güven May 11 '17 at 19:11

In order to create a random number in javascript we can use the built in javascript Math object. The Math object holds a function Math.random(). This function does the following (source MDN):

The Math.random() function returns a floating-point, pseudo-random number in the range 0–1 (inclusive of 0, but not 1) with approximately uniform distribution over that range — which you can then scale to your desired range.

Given this functionality we can easily scale this into more complex scenarios. For example:

function randomNR (x, y){
return Math.round((Math.random() * x + y));
}

// dice >> random number between 1-6
// dice functionality without function >> Math.round((Math.random() * 5 + 1))
console.log(randomNR(5,1));


// coin >> random number between 0-1
// coin functionality without function >> Math.round((Math.random() * 1))
console.log(randomNR(1,0))

Instead of Math.random(), you can use crypto.getRandomValues() to generate evenly-distributed cryptographically-secure random numbers. Here's an example:

function randInt(min, max) {
  var MAX_UINT32 = 0xFFFFFFFF;
  var range = max - min;

  if (!(range <= MAX_UINT32)) {
    throw new Error(
      "Range of " + range + " covering " + min + " to " + max + " is > " +
      MAX_UINT32 + ".");
  } else if (min === max) {
    return min;
  } else if (!(max > min)) {
    throw new Error("max (" + max + ") must be >= min (" + min + ").");
  }

  // We need to cut off values greater than this to avoid bias in distribution
  // over the range.
  var maxUnbiased = MAX_UINT32 - ((MAX_UINT32 + 1) % (range + 1));

  var rand;
  do {
    rand = crypto.getRandomValues(new Uint32Array(1))[0];
  } while (rand > maxUnbiased);

  var offset = rand % (range + 1);
  return min + offset;
}

console.log(randInt(-8, 8));          // -2
console.log(randInt(0, 0));           // 0
console.log(randInt(0, 0xFFFFFFFF));  // 944450079
console.log(randInt(-1, 0xFFFFFFFF));
// Uncaught Error: Range of 4294967296 covering -1 to 4294967295 is > 4294967295.
console.log(new Array(24).fill().map(n => randInt(8, 12)));
// [11, 8, 8, 11, 10, 8, 8, 12, 12, 12, 9, 9,
//  11, 8, 11, 8, 8, 8, 11, 9, 10, 12, 9, 11]
console.log(randInt(10, 8));
// Uncaught Error: max (8) must be >= min (10).

  • 6
    WARNING This needs to be reviewed. Do not trust it to be secure/unbiased. – user Apr 10 '16 at 23:05
function random(min, max){
    return Math.floor(Math.random() * (max - min + 1)) + min;
}
  • 6
    That answer has been posted years ago, and with some explanation that is missing here. What's the point? – Touffy Nov 14 '17 at 9:08

I found Francisc's solution above did not include the min or max number in the results, so I altered it like this:

function randomInt(min,max)
{
    return Math.floor(Math.random()*(max-(min+1))+(min+1));
}
  • 8
    Not true. I ran both methods through 1,000,000,000 iterations using different min/max values. When I used min of 1 with max of 2, Francisc's method hit the floor and ceiling each about 50% of the time; your method hit the ceiling 100% of the time. I then ran each method using min of 1 and max of 4. Francisc's method hit the floor and ceiling each 25% of the time; yours scored 0%. – Secesh May 25 '14 at 23:05
  • 6
    Ah ok. Thanks for checking this and taking the time to reply, I appreciate it. – Rastus Oxide May 27 '14 at 0:11

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