4

Using the fluent api, how do I map a custom type as the primary key within my OnModelCreating method of the DbContext class?

Using EF Core I'm trying to build a model for the follow entity.

public class Account
{
    public AccountId AccountId { get; }

    public string Name { get; set; }

    private Account()
    {
    }

    public Account(AccountId accountId, string name)
    {
        AccountId = accountId;
        Name = name;            
    }
}

Where the primary key is the AccountId; the type is a simple value object like this.

public class AccountId
{
    public string Id { get; }

    public AccountId(string accountId)
    {
        Id = accountId;
    }
}

Within OnModelCreating, I found I can't map the AccountId without having a backing field. So I introduced the backing field _accountId. I don't want the AccountId to have a setter.

public class Account
{
    private string _accountId;
    public AccountId AccountId { get { return new AccountId(_accountId); } }

    public string Name { get; set; }

    private Account()
    {
    }

    public Account(AccountId accountId, string name)
    {
        _accountId = accountId.Id;
        Name = name;            
    }
}

But I still can't figure out how you specify a property with a backing field which is also the primary key.

protected override void OnModelCreating(ModelBuilder modelBuilder)
{
    base.OnModelCreating(modelBuilder);

    var account = modelBuilder.Entity<Account>();

    account.ToTable("Accounts");
    account.HasKey(x => x.AccountId);
    account.Property(x => x.AccountId).HasField("_accountId");
}

The OnModelCreating throws an exception on the property map line (account.Property(x => x.AccountId).HasField("_accountId");). Stating that property and field have to be the same type.

  • 1
    Why do you need to introduce a new type and not just use string instead? – M Bakardzhiev Apr 2 '18 at 8:24
  • 1
    @MBakardzhiev I'm starting to question that - I wanted methods that accept the account id to be more explicit and less fragile to refactor changes. e.g. the constructor for Account takes accountid and name, if I swapped the args then I'll get compile time error but I wouldn't if they were both strings. – Chris Moutray Apr 2 '18 at 8:36
  • 1
    @MBakardzhiev I appreciate that I'm trying to cut corners and use the Account class as both my database dto and my domain object for business logic but I wanted to see if I could write it this way rather than question whether I should. – Chris Moutray Apr 2 '18 at 8:39
  • 1
    I found this one question similar to yours stackoverflow.com/questions/46098923/custom-type-as-primary-key, it is about EF standart, unfortunately it doesn't have an answer that may help you. I would not be surprised if such option is intentionally not included in EF. – M Bakardzhiev Apr 2 '18 at 9:34
  • 2
    Currently owned type is the closest, but it's tracked by reference like entity. Eventually the incoming EF Core 2.1 type conversions might help. – Ivan Stoev Apr 2 '18 at 9:39
2

As pointed out, one can use a custom typed property as entity key by taking advantage of the Value Conversion feature in EF Core 2.1

So in your own example instead of mapping the property to a backing field, you can now define a custom conversion for it like this:

protected override void OnModelCreating(ModelBuilder modelBuilder)
{
    ...
    account.HasKey(x => x.AccountId);
    account.Property(x => x.AccountId)
        .HasConversion(
            v => v.Id,
            v => new AccountId(v));
}

As described in the documentation, also a ValueConverter class can be implemented to make the conversion reusable and many custom converters are also provided out of the box.

Note: It's a good idea to implement IComparable and IComparable<T> for your custom AccountId class. Because EF Core seems to sort your changed entities based on their Keys internally for batch operations and you would receive an exception if your Key is not comparable!

  • 2
    This is a good idea, but doesn't work for multi-valued objects, as noted here: docs.microsoft.com/en-us/ef/core/modeling/… – Ovan Crone Nov 9 '18 at 22:19
  • 2
    I am facing a problem when setting a converter for a key: if the type is a class when adding a new entity a key cannot be null and an exception is thrown; if the type is a struct (so it cannot be null) it works but the key cannot be set as auto-increment - well I cannot find a way to set it auto-increment. – polkduran Jan 25 at 10:08
  • Be very careful. Linq2Sql is not work! – RouR Apr 5 at 20:28
  • Anyone get this to work when building relationships as a Single Navigation Property (aka the child does not have a property relating to the parent (docs.microsoft.com/en-us/ef/core/modeling/relationships))? When I use Set<Account>().Include(a => a.Children) the children collection is always emtpy. When i make the Id an integer instead of an AccountId then my Include works – jmzagorski Jun 13 at 0:34

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