This seems like a simple task, but using duckduckgo I wasn't able to find a way to properly do what I'm trying to.

The main question is: How do I split the output of a command in linux or bash into multiple columns using a delimeter?

I have a file that looks like this: (this is just a simplified example)

-----------------------------------
Some data
that varies in line length
-----------------------------------

-----------------------------------
More data that is seperated
by a new line and dashes
-----------------------------------

And so on. Everytime data gets written to the file, it's enclosed in a line of dashes, seperated by an empty line from the last block. Line-length of the data varies. What I want is basically a tool or way using bash to split the file into multiple columns like this:

-----------------------------------        -----------------------------------
Some data                                  More data that is seperated
that varies in line length                 by a new line and dashes
-----------------------------------        -----------------------------------

Each column should take 50% of the screen, no centering (as in alignment) needed. The file has to be split per-block. Splitting the file in the middle or something like that won't work. I basically want block 1 go to the left column, block 2 to the right, 3 to the left again, 4 right, and so on. The file gets updated constantly and updates should be written to the screen right away. (Currently I'm using tail -f)

Since this sounds like a rather common question I would welcome a general approach to this instead of a specific answer that works only for my case so people coming from search engines looking for a way to have a two column layout in bash get some information too. I tried column and pr, both don't work as desired. (I elaborated on this in the comments)

Edit: To be clear, I am looking for a general approach on this. Going through a file, getting data between the delimiter, putting it to column A, getting the next one putting it to column B, and so on.

  • column -t -s "-----------------------------------" file prints the file out like a chaos. Without the -t it's three columns. Adding -c 2 results in only one column. No matter what I use, column always says column: file too long. – confetti Apr 3 at 0:53
  • pr refuses to split at my delimiter, even with the --sep-string supplied. pr -t -2 --sep-string="----..." results yet again in an ugly mess. Also, pr is splitting the file in half instead of block-by-block. column does the same. – confetti Apr 3 at 0:59

The question is tagged as Perl so here is a possible Perl answer:

#!/usr/bin/env perl
use strict;
use warnings;

my $is_col1 = 1;
my $in_block = 0;
my @col1;

while (<DATA>) {
    chomp;
    if (/^\s*-+\s*$/ ... /^\s*-+\s*$/) {
        $in_block = 1;
        if ($is_col1) {
            push @col1, $_;
        }
        else {
            printf "%-40s%-40s\n", shift @col1 // '', $_;
        }

    }
    else {
        if ($in_block) {
            $in_block = ! $in_block;
            $is_col1 = ! $is_col1;
            print "\n" if $is_col1; # line separating blocks
        }
    }
}

print join("\n", @col1), "\n\n" if @col1;

__DATA__
-----------------------------------
Some data
that varies in line length
-----------------------------------

-----------------------------------
More data that is seperated
by a new line and dashes
with a longer column2
-----------------------------------


-----------------------------------
The odd last column
-----------------------------------

Output:

-----------------------------------     -----------------------------------
Some data                               More data that is seperated
that varies in line length              by a new line and dashes
-----------------------------------     with a longer column2
                                        -----------------------------------

-----------------------------------
The odd last column
-----------------------------------
  • How would I invoke this? I'm sorry, I never used perl but since it ships with linux and works for me I added it as a tag. I tried piping tail -f to the perl script, but it gives me Name "main::DATA" used only once: possible typo at test.pl line 10. and readline() on unopened filehandle DATA at test.pl line 10. . Keep in mind the file I'm reading from has to get updated on change. – confetti Apr 3 at 11:49
  • 1
    The "DATA" section and file handle are used so the program can be easily tested and demoed. To pipe a file through it remember to add the first shebang line I just added, do a chmod +x on the program file to make it executable and change while (<DATA>) { to just while (<>) { to read from stdin. Let me know if you have other difficulties running it. – mr_ron Apr 3 at 12:20
  • 1
    The error you are getting suggests to me that you did not copy they whole script and need to include the lines from __DATA__ on so you can test with while (<DATA>) { (still works when you change the while loop). – mr_ron Apr 3 at 12:34
  • This comes very close to my desired result, but is still not quite doing what I want: A script that gets content between two delimeters and splits it into two columns. On some lines your script also causes weird shifts, and the columns' height shouldn't be affected by each other, as in there should always be a fixed amount of newlines between each block in both columns. – confetti Apr 3 at 15:52
  • If some of the input lines are longer than 40 chars my script won't truncate or wrap so that might cause the shifts you are seeing. Piping the output through the UNIX fold program like | fold -w40 | would wrap and solve that unless your ---- separator lines are also longer than 40 in which case they would need to be truncated like | sed 's/^\(-\{40\}\)-*$/\1/' | fold -w40 | . If these suggestions work let me know and I may try to address the height issue. – mr_ron Apr 3 at 19:55

This script is getting max width of current terminal and splitting it in 2, then printing records split by RS="\n\n" separator, print the first found and placing the cursor at the first line/last column of it to write the next record.

#!/bin/bash

tput clear
# get half current terminal width
twidth=$(($(tput cols)/2))

tail -n 100 -f test.txt | stdbuf -i0 -o0 gawk -v twidth=$twidth 'BEGIN{ RS="\n\n"; FS=OFS="\n"; oldNF=0 } {
    sep="-----------------------------------"
    pad="                    "
    printf "%-" twidth "s", $0

    getline

    for(i = 1; i <= NF; i++){
    # move cursor to first line, last column of previous record
    print "\033[" oldNF ";" twidth "f" $i
    oldNF+=1
    }
}'

Here's a simpler version

gawk 'BEGIN{ RS="[-]+\n\n"; FS="\n" } {
    sep="-----------------------------------"
    le=$2
    lo=$3
    getline

    printf "%-40s %-40s\n", sep,sep
    printf "%-40s %-40s\n", le,$2
    printf "%-40s %-40s\n", lo,$3
    printf "%-40s %-40s\n\n", sep,sep
}' test.txt

Output

-----------------------------------      -----------------------------------     
Some data                                More data that is seperated             
that varies in line length               by a new line and dashes                
-----------------------------------      -----------------------------------     

-----------------------------------      -----------------------------------     
Some data                                More data that is seperated             
that varies in line length               by a new line and dashes                
-----------------------------------      ----------------------------------- 
  • I don't understand awk (sadly), but this doesn't work for me. It doesn't print anything between the seperators, except some empty lines but in a non-expected way. Screenshot: i.imgur.com/K4bKSJf.png. Each column also does not use 50% of the screen as desired. – confetti Apr 3 at 4:17
  • Tried changing the 40's to 70's, that fixes this one weird line at the top and is a way to make it occupy 50% of the screen per column. Still no data and weird empty lines though: i.imgur.com/FNEMOor.png – confetti Apr 3 at 4:40
  • By changing the \n\n, in the RS definition to a single \n I am getting no non-expected new lines anymore. However most of the data is still missing (I'm only getting the third line of each data block, and only on the right column). Maybe it is relevant to mention that those blocks are seperated by three empty lines, not just one. I'm looking for a more general solution though that makes a two-column layout in bash possible. – confetti Apr 3 at 4:49
  • By changing the RS as I said above I'm getting a good looking output. However it is only printing the first two lines of each data set. Like I said in my question, the line-length within the blocks varies and can also contain newlines. – confetti Apr 3 at 4:52
  • My answer was based on the MCVE you provided, please update your question with ALL relevant information (records separated by 3 newlines, number of new lines on each records is variable, etc.). – Luis Muñoz Apr 3 at 14:20

Assuming file contains uniform blocks of five lines each, using paste, sed, and printf:

c=$((COLUMNS/2)) 
paste -d'#' <(sed -n 'p;n;p;n;p;n;p;n;p;n;n;n;n;n' file) \
            <(sed -n 'n;n;n;n;n;p;n;p;n;p;n;p;n;p' file) | 
sed 's/.*/"&"/;s/#/" "/' | 
xargs -L 1 printf "%-${c}s %-${c}s\n"

Problem with OP spec

The OP reports that the block lengths may vary, and should be separated by a fixed number of lines. Even numbered blocks go in Column A, odd numbered blocks in Column B.

That creates a tail -f problem then. Suppose the block lengths of the source input begin with 1000 lines, then one line, 1000, 1, 1000, 1, etc. So Column A gets all the 1000 line blocks, and Column B gets all the one line blocks. Let's say the blocks in the output are separated by 1 line each. So one block in Column A lines up with 500 blocks in Column B. So for a terminal with scrolling output, that means before we can output the first block in Column A, we have to wait for 1000 blocks of input. To output the third block in Column A, (just below the first block), we have to wait for 2000 blocks of input.

If the blocks are added to the input file relatively slowly, with a one second delay between blocks, then it will take three seconds for the block 3 to appear in the input file, but it will take 33 minutes for block 3 to be displayed in the output file.

  • This works for an existing file, but probably needs tweaking for cope with a continually updating input. – agc Apr 3 at 5:58
  • Like I said, they don't. The number of lines within the blocks can be anything between 3 and, theoretically, in the few hundreds. I'd really love a general answer that helps others aswell instead of just fixing my specific case. – confetti Apr 3 at 8:10
  • @confetti, Sorry the Q is unclear on block length. Please edit the Q to reflect the specs given in your comments. Also suppose the first block is 1000 lines, the 2nd is one line, the third one line -- should the 2nd block in column two have about 999 blank lines below it or what? – agc Apr 4 at 5:40
  • I dont know how many times I have to stress this: The block length should not matter. I'm looking for a general approach to split a file into multiple columns based on a delimeter. Column B should not be affected by column A and vice versa. Each block in each column should be seperated by a fixed amount of newlines. – confetti Apr 4 at 6:11
  • Replying to your edit: I see where you are coming from. I'm guessing at this point that multiplexing the terminal might be the best solution for this case. A 1000 line block is very unlikely though. Usually, it's 3-10 per block. I just thought there was a sort-of easy way to achieve this kinda functionality. – confetti Apr 4 at 15:04
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Alright, since apprently there is no clean way to do this I came up with my own solution. It's a bit messy and requires GNU screen to be installed, but it works. Any amount of lines within or around the blocks, 50% of the screen automatically resizing and each column prints independantly from each other with a fixed amount of newlines between them. Also automatic updates every x seconds. (120 in my example)

#!/bin/bash

screen -S testscr -X layout save default
screen -S testscr -X split -v
screen -S testscr -X screen tail -f /tmp/testscr1.txt
screen -S testscr -X focus
screen -S testscr -X screen tail -f /tmp/testscr2.txt

while : ; do
    echo "" > /tmp/testscr1.txt
    echo "" > /tmp/testscr2.txt
    cfile=1 # current column
    ctype=0 # start or end of block

    while read; do
        if [[ $REPLY == "------------------------------------------------------------" ]]; then
            if [[ $ctype -eq 0 ]]; then
                ctype=1
            else
                if [[ $cfile -eq 1 ]]; then
                    echo "${REPLY}" >> /tmp/testscr1.txt
                    echo "" >> /tmp/testscr1.txt
                    echo "" >> /tmp/testscr1.txt
                    cfile=2
                else
                    echo "${REPLY}" >> /tmp/testscr2.txt
                    echo "" >> /tmp/testscr2.txt
                    echo "" >> /tmp/testscr2.txt
                    cfile=1
                fi
                ctype=0
            fi
        fi
        if [[ $ctype -eq 1 ]]; then
            if [[ $cfile -eq 1 ]]; then
                echo "${REPLY}" >> /tmp/testscr1.txt
            else
                echo "${REPLY}" >> /tmp/testscr2.txt
            fi
        fi
    done < "$1"
    sleep 120
done

First, start a screen session with screen -S testscr then, either within or outside the session, execute the script above. This will split the screen vertically using 50% per column and execute tail -f on both columns, afterwards it will go through the input file and write block by block to each tmp. file in the desired way. Since it's in an infinite while loop it's essentially automatically updating the shown output every x seconds (here 120).

  • I couldn't get your solution working on Ubuntu which I assume has gnu screen. I don't have much experience with screen. I first ran screen -S testscr and then your script as bin/so-solution <t/data/01-original-post.in and get error tail: /tmp/testscr1.txt: file truncated in both halves of the terminal. In the meantime I developed to your requirements with documenation and tests on GitHub: github.com/ronaldxs/two-cols . Let me know if you have further interest in me posting from the GH project here. – mr_ron Apr 5 at 21:41
  • The problem with your script is what stackoverflow.com/users/6136214/agc pointed out that I wasn't fully aware of at first. If the terminal isn't multiplexed, there is no way to have the two columns independantly on each other. Did you run the script I provided inside the screen? It might be neccessary on some screen versions. The seperators are different in this answer and the OP. Please try out my solution with this file: pastebin.com/vKBxayjS or change the seperator. This is my output: i.imgur.com/Xy4sHD4.png with new content being added properly and right away. – confetti Apr 6 at 9:54

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