I have this string with users data:

"1111|John|Smith|32\n2222|Sam|Adams|25\n3333|Chris|Stevens|30\n"

And I'm trying to read it with regex and create a hash like this (using JSON notation to make it easy to understand):

{
    "1111": {
        "IdNumber" : "1111",
        "Name" : "John",
        "LastName" : "Smith",
        "Age" : "32"
    },
    "2222": {
        "IdNumber" : "2222",
        "Name" : "Sam",
        "LastName" : "Adams",
        "Age" : "25"
    },
    "3333": {
        "IdNumber" : "3333",
        "Name" : "Chris",
        "LastName" : "Stevens",
        "Age" : "30"
    },
}

The parent hash has to have the users' ids as keys, and the value will be a child hash with all the user data.

I tried to assing directly the resulting $+ hash, using named groups:

use strict;
use warnings;

use Data::Dumper;

my $str = "1111|John|Smith|32\n2222|Sam|Adams|25\n3333|Chris|Stevens|30\n";

my %users;

while ($str =~ /(?<IdNumber>.*?)\|(?<Name>.*?)\|(?<LastName>.*?)\|(?<Age>.*?)/g){
    $users{$+{IdNumber}} = %+;
}

print Dumper %users;

But I'm getting this result:

$VAR1 = '1111';
$VAR2 = 4;
$VAR3 = '3333';
$VAR4 = 4;
$VAR5 = '2222';
$VAR6 = 4;

It seems to me like the child hash is being converted to scalar, but I can't find the error.

Do you have some idea? Thank you.

  • suggestion: split the data first on \n and then on | instead of using regex – Sundeep Apr 3 at 10:28
up vote 4 down vote accepted
open(my $fh, '<', \$str);

my %users;
while (<$fh>) {
   chomp;
   my %row;
   @row{qw( IdNumber Name LastName Age )} = split /\|/;
   $users{ $row{IdNumber} } = \%row;
}

Or,

my %users;
for (split /^/m, $str) {
   chomp;
   my %row;
   @row{qw( IdNumber Name LastName Age )} = split /\|/;
   $users{ $row{IdNumber} } = \%row;
}

Or, since we can safely ignore training blank lines,

my %users;
for (split /\n/, $str) {
   my %row;
   @row{qw( IdNumber Name LastName Age )} = split /\|/;
   $users{ $row{IdNumber} } = \%row;
}
  • Thank you, this works fine. Do you know if split has a good performance compared to regex? – nanocv Apr 3 at 10:39
  • 1
    That's a rather weird question seeing as its first argument is a regex pattern. Weirder still, the answer is that it's faster than a regex match. – ikegami Apr 3 at 10:40

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