49

I am a bit confused by the following code:

#include <iostream>

const char* f()
{
    const char* arr[]={"test"};
    return arr[0];
}

int main()
{
    auto x = f();
    std::cout << x;
}

In my opinion, this code should be UB (undefined behaviour). We return a pointer to a C-style array element inside a local scope. Things should go wrong. However, none of the compilers I tested with complain (I used -Wall -Wextra -pedantic on both g++ and clang). valgrind does not complain either.

Is the code above valid or is it UB as one would think?

PS: running it seems to produce the "correct" result, i.e. displaying "test", but that's not an indication of correctness.

14
  • 10
    FWIW the reason it "works" in practice is that the constant-string "test" is being stored in the executable's static-data area, and thus the string remains valid even after the function returns. (Whether or not it's guaranteed to work by the language spec is another issue, of course) Commented Apr 3, 2018 at 16:25
  • 2
    No harm in asking these things, and this question is well-written. +1.
    – Bathsheba
    Commented Apr 3, 2018 at 16:26
  • 2
    @JesperJuhl I know what UB is, and the fact that the moon may explode because of it. I'm asking if the code is really UB. And it looks like it's not. And it looks like quite a few out there believes the code is UB... So I think the question is useful.
    – vsoftco
    Commented Apr 3, 2018 at 16:33
  • 1
    @Bathsheba It looks we're still learning here :) Indeed the code is not UB.
    – vsoftco
    Commented Apr 3, 2018 at 16:46
  • 2
    @vsoftco: Didn't think it was, but it takes an expert like Barry to point out why.
    – Bathsheba
    Commented Apr 3, 2018 at 16:49

2 Answers 2

79

No, it's not UB.

This:

const char* f()
{
    const char* arr[]={"test"};
    return arr[0];
}

Can be rewritten to the equivalent:

const char* f()
{
    const char* arr0 = "test";
    return arr0;
}

So we're just returning a local pointer, to a string literal. String literals have static storage duration, nothing dangles. The function really is the same as:

const char* f()
{
    return "test";
}

If you did something like this:

const char* f() {
    const char arr[] = "test"; // local array of char, not array of char const*
    return arr;
}

Now that is UB - we're returning a dangling pointer.

13
  • 1
    "String literals have static storage duration" - I know all the compilers do this; but is it really in the standards that string literals MUST be with static duration?
    – UKMonkey
    Commented Apr 3, 2018 at 16:37
  • @UKMonkey Yep, added the reference.
    – Barry
    Commented Apr 3, 2018 at 16:37
  • 3
    Not to be pedantic, but that's not really "equivalent". Functionally, in this context, sure, but an array is an array is an array. ;) Commented Apr 3, 2018 at 17:08
  • 4
    @LightnessRacesinOrbit, In both cases, there is a local pointer to const char, in both cases the local pointer is initialized to point to a literal string, and in both cases its value is returned. The only difference is, in the original example, the local pointer is a member of a one element array, and in the alternate version, it's a scalar. So what if there is some sense in which those are not "equivalent"? What matters here is not the exact type of the local variable. What matters is whether or not the string literal will remain valid after the function returns. Commented Apr 3, 2018 at 21:44
  • 2
    C does also guarantee that string literals have static storage duration, see port70.net/~nsz/c/c11/n1570.html#6.4.5p6 .
    – zwol
    Commented Apr 4, 2018 at 2:18
3

The array arr has local storage duration and will disappear at the end of scope. The string literal "test" however is a pointer to a static storage location. Temporarily storing this pointer in the local array arr before returning it doesn't change that. It will always be a static storage location.

Note that if the function were to return a C++ style string type instead of a C style const char *, the additional conversion/bookkeeping would likely leave you with a value limited in lifetime according to C++ temporary rules.

0

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