2

My API has only POST action method. I want to create a library which will validate the input to my API. Now I want to do this validation before hitting my controller action method.

I have decided to use Middleware approach -

public class ValidateInputMiddleware
{
    private readonly RequestDelegate _next;

    public ValidateInputMiddleware(RequestDelegate next)
    {
        _next = next;
    }

    public async Task Invoke(HttpContext httpContext)
    {
        //read the request body

        //serialize the json body to input model

        //validations
        if(reqJsonObj.Id == null)
            //return response - id is null

        //other validations

        await _next(httpContext);
    }
}

If my validation condition is met then I don't want the other item in the pipeline to execute.

I need help with -

  1. How I can restrict other items in the pipeline from executing.

  2. How I can return customized error response in form of JSON.

  • Why not use the ModelState? docs.microsoft.com/en-us/aspnet/core/mvc/models/validation – illug Apr 4 '18 at 10:02
  • @illug That's not what my boss wants to do :( – arpymastro Apr 4 '18 at 10:15
  • 1
    Get a new one. ASAP! :) – illug Apr 4 '18 at 10:16
  • 2
    Don’t use a middleware for this, that’s too low-level for this. Use an action filter instead. – poke Apr 4 '18 at 10:41
  • 1
    What is the actual reason behind not wanting to use model state? I can understand if it’s sometimes maybe not flexible enough (though a generic filter/middleware wouldn’t be able to solve that either), but I’d assume that this is actually just an uneducated decision, so you should probably not just settle for that before actually considering what would be the right way to approach your problem. – poke Apr 4 '18 at 11:08
6

You should not use a custom middleware for this. Middlewares a very low-level and as you noticed, you will have to read and parse the request body yourself. Not only is that complicated but it also results in this happening twice (again inside the MVC middleware).

Instead, you should be using a MVC filter, in particular an action filter. Filters run as part of the MVC pipeline, so you can depend on various things that the MVC pipeline already does for you, e.g. model binding or authorization.

It also makes it easier to abort the response and return a custom JSON response instead, since you again won’t have to manually serialize your content but instead can use the high-level MVC results.

An action filter for your situation could look like this:

public class InputValidationActionFilter : IActionFilter
{
    public void OnActionExecuting(ActionExecutingContext context)
    {
        // we can even *still* use model state properly…
        if (!context.ModelState.IsValid)
        {
            var responseObj = new {
                successful = false,
                error = "The input is not valid",
            };

            // setting the result shortcuts the pipeline, so the action is never executed
            context.Result = new JsonResult(responseObj)
            {
                StatusCode = 400
            };
        }
    }

    public void OnActionExecuted(ActionExecutedContext context)
    { }
}
| improve this answer | |
  • how I can return the custom response based on each field/property validation? For e.g., if my id is null the return "please enter id" and do not execute the other checks. – arpymastro Apr 4 '18 at 10:57
  • You can do any kind of logic inside of that filter. Of course, if you need to validate actual properties of a model (instead of using proper model validation which I would recommend here), then you will have to know the actual type; you can retrieve the model object from context.ActionArguments. Otherwise, you could also simply serialize the errors from the ModelState and report all validation errors directly. – poke Apr 4 '18 at 11:05
  • 1
    After long discussions.. we are now ready to take ActionFilter approach.. Thanks @poke for reasoning out the usage of Middleware, ActionFilter – arpymastro Apr 5 '18 at 5:20

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.