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I have a working Perl script that is opening a file, searching through for a text string. When the string is matched it prints the previous 10 lines previous each time.

My question is how could I adapt this to run against multiple files from a directory?

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use strict;

my $file = "myfile.txt";

open   (LOGFILE, $file);
my @cont = <LOGFILE>;
close(LOGFILE);

for(my $i = 0; $i <= $#cont; $i++) {
my $line = $cont[$i];

if ($line =~ /Voice VLAN: [0-9]/i) {
  my $st;
  ($i <= 0) ? ($st = 0) : ($st = $i - 10);
  my $ln = $i - 1;

  my $eln = $i + 1;
  my $en = $i + 0;
  ($en > $#cont) ? ($en = $#cont) : ();

  print @cont[$st..$ln];
  print $line;
  print @cont[$eln..$en];

}
}
  • 2
    Just wrap it in another loop for my $file (@files). Also, if the files are large, processing them line by line with a sliding window of size 10 would be more memory friendly. – choroba Apr 4 '18 at 13:28
  • 1
    Just use grep -B10 "pattern" files to get the 10 lines before each match. – Mark Setchell Apr 4 '18 at 14:43
2

There is no need to read the whole file into memory, keeping a buffer of previous lines is enough.
Applying the algorithm to multiple files is straighforward: just open the file, process it and close.
Here is a generic solution imitating grep -A x -B y where $B is the count of preceding lines and $A is the count of following lines to print after a match:

grep_AB.pl:

use strict; use warnings;
my $filter=qr/match/;
my ($A,$B)=(1,1);

for my $file(@ARGV) {
    open my $fh, '<', $file or die "$file:$!\n"; 
    my (@buffer,$tail);
    while(<>) {
        if (m{$filter})  {
            $tail=1+$A;
            print for @buffer;
            @buffer=();
        }
        if ($tail-->0) {
            print;
        }
        else {
            push @buffer, $_;
            shift @buffer if @buffer>$B;
        }
    }
    close $fh;
}

Given the following input (input.txt):

1
2
3
match
match
4
match
5
6
match
7
8
9
10
match
11
12

The output of perl grep_AB.pl input.txt is:

3
match
match
4
match
5
6
match
7
10
match
11
1

If you are ok with specifying the files on the command line:

use warnings;
use strict;

my @buf;
while (<>) {
     push @buf, $_;
    print @buf if /Voice VLAN: [0-9]/i;
    shift @buf if @buf>10;
}

If you want to specify the files in the script, you can "hack it in" by saying local @ARGV = ('myfile.txt'); before the loop. Although the cleaner solution, for example if this code is part of a longer script, is:

use warnings;
use strict;

my @files = ('myfile.txt');

for my $file (@files) {
    open my $fh, '<', $file or die "$file: $!";
    my @buf;
    while (<$fh>) {
         push @buf, $_;
        print @buf if /Voice VLAN: [0-9]/i;
        shift @buf if @buf>10;
    }
    close $fh;
}

This same loop could be used on your original code as well, if you prefer, as @choroba mentioned in the comment.


Update: If you want to prefix the output with the filename, you could modify the print in the second of the above examples to this, which I hope is fairly self-explanatory:

if ( /Voice VLAN: [0-9]/i ) {
    for my $line (@buf) {
        print "$file: $line";
    }
}

Or, if you prefer the shorter version, you can change the print in the first example into:

print map {"$ARGV: $_"} @buf if /Voice VLAN: [0-9]/i;

which does something very similar. I've used map instead of for to loop over the array, which means that print is called only once with a list of strings. Also, I'm getting the filename that the "magic" <> operator is currently reading from $ARGV.

  • Yes tried this one and edited the my @files for the directory, the processing is a little slow on my windows PC, but it gets me the output I need.. Many thanks.. tried to vote you up, but not allowed as I am still a newbie – normbeef Apr 4 '18 at 14:34
  • @normbeef: You can accept the answer if the answer is ok. – ssr1012 Apr 4 '18 at 14:37
  • @normbeef I did a quick benchmark and it looks like my script is slightly faster than your original. If you are concerned about performance there are ways to optimize, but you'd need to provide more details, like how many files with how many lines each you're working with, how many matches are in those files, how slow is "slow", how fast do you need the script to run, etc. – haukex Apr 4 '18 at 15:14
  • @haukex no problem on the processing, I increased the 10 line match to 11 as there are carriage returns in the data and for some reason its running a bit better now. many thanks for the help The only issue that I forgot to ask for is now I am processing many files rather than just one I need to see the filename in the output. – normbeef Apr 5 '18 at 9:34
  • @normbeef I've updated my answer. – haukex Apr 6 '18 at 9:27

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