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I’m trying to make an über-simple (single-character) prompt that gives me as much information as possible. Here’s what I have at the moment (had it for ages, can’t remember where I found the original):

# RPS1="['%1v', '%2v', '%3v', '%4v', '%5v', '%6v', '%7v', '%8v', '%9v']" # debug
PS1=" %(?|%2F|%1F)%1(V|%1v|%(#|#|:))%(?|%2f|%1f) "

function zle-line-init {
  zle -K vicmd
}
zle -N   zle-line-init

function zle-keymap-select {
  psvar[1]="${${KEYMAP/(main|viins)/>}/vicmd/}"
  zle reset-prompt
  psvar[1]=""
}
zle -N   zle-keymap-select

This is fairly simple; it initializes the prompt into command mode on rendering, and displays a : prompt when in the vi’s “command” mode, and a > prompt (by changing psvar[1]) when in vi’s “insert” mode. In addition, the : is replaced with # if you are acting as root, and the color of the character exhibits the exit status of the last command.

My problem:

When the keymap changes (that is, when I toggle through the “command” and “insert” modes using, as an example, a and then the escape key, the $? exit-status is overtrodden with a successful 0 status, thus causing the prompt to display in green instead of red (even if the previous command failed). How can I save or set the prompt such that the %(?|…|…) portions of $PS1 will properly display the exit status of the last command sent to the shell?

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I got the following answer from Bart Schaefer on the zsh-users mailing list. It works!

This was fixed in July 2010, so eventually you won't need to do anything:

   * users/15217: Src/Zle/zle_main.c: use top-level status when redrawing prompt.

In the meantime, try this:

function zle-keymap-select { local Q=$? psvar[1]="${${KEYMAP/(main|viins)/>}/vicmd/}" (return $Q) zle reset-prompt psvar[1]="" }

If your zsh is recent enough to have anonymous functions, you can replace the subshell (return $Q) with (){ return $Q }.

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function zle-keymap-select {
  local saved_exitcode=$?
  psvar[1]="${${KEYMAP/(main|viins)/>}/vicmd/}"
  zle reset-prompt
  psvar[1]=""
  return $saved_exitcode
}
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  • That’s the first thing I tried! ;D It doesn’t actually solve the problem, though. The return value of the hook function itself seems to be irrelevant. Feb 11 '11 at 6:38
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oldexitcode=$?
∶
# do stuff...
∶
( exit $oldexitcode )
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  • See my comment on Phil P’s answer “above.” Doesn’t work either. )-: Feb 11 '11 at 16:20

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