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I'm trying to learn how to use credentials with PowerShell Desired State Configuration, and I can't quite grok the difference between the Credential and PsDscRunAsCredential attributes of a resource.

As a simple test case, I'm trying to copy a folder and it's contents from a file share to a local folder on the target node. The computer account of the target node does not have access to the share, so I'm supplying credentials that do have access. If I assign the credentials to the Credential attribute of the File resource, it works. If I use the PsDscRunAsCredential attribute, I get an "access is denied" error when it tries to access the file share.

Configuration FileWithCredential {

    Import-DscResource -ModuleName PSDesiredStateConfiguration

    Node $AllNodes.NodeName {

        # copy files from a file share to a new folder on the target node
        File CopyFileShareFolder {
            Ensure = 'Present'
            Type = 'Directory'
            Recurse = $true
            SourcePath = '\\fileshare\folder\subfolder\stuff_I_want_to_copy'
            DestinationPath = 'c:\ps\DSC\filesharedestination'
            # If I use Credential instead of PsDscRunAsCredential, it works
            # Credential = Get-Credential -UserName ourdomain\myaccout -Message 'Enter Password'
            PsDscRunAsCredential = Get-Credential -UserName ourdomain\myaccout -Message 'Enter Password'
        }
    }
}

$ConfigData = @{
    AllNodes = @(
        @{
            NodeName = 'target-server'
            PsDscAllowDomainUser = $true
            PsDscAllowPlainTextPassword = $true
        }
    )
}

I'm compiling the MOF on a Windows 10 box and pushing the configuration to a Server 2016 box. Both are running PowerShell 5.1.

PS C:\Users\me\Documents\pscode\dsc_test2> FileWithCredential -ConfigurationData $ConfigData
PS C:\Users\me\Documents\pscode\dsc_test2> Start-DscConfiguration .\FileWithCredential\ -Verbose -Wait -Force

I understand that PsDscRunAsCredential is new, and I'm assuming there's a reason to prefer it over the old Credential, but I can't figure out what the real differences are. Are they basically interchangeable? If not, what am I missing that would make the "run as" credential work?

NOTE: I understand the security risk of allowing plain text passwords, but right now I'm just trying to understand how to pass credentials and make sure they work. Learning how to do so securely is next on my list.

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  • I just had a thought: the File resource is.. somewhat special. It's one of the only resources implemented as binary. It has some strange quirks like not returning a ModuleName when you run Get-DscResource. Maybe it's implemented in a way that the LCM cannot change its context. It would be interesting to turn on debugging for DSC, then break into the debugger and check out your context, try to access the share and local file system, etc. – briantist Apr 5 '18 at 0:42
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It seems like my hunch might have been right; turning my comment into an answer:

I just had a thought: the File resource is.. somewhat special. It's one of the only resources implemented as binary. It has some strange quirks like not returning a ModuleName when you run Get-DscResource. Maybe it's implemented in a way that the LCM cannot change its context. It would be interesting to turn on debugging for DSC, then break into the debugger and check out your context, try to access the share and local file system, etc.

In running a test, it seems to be the case that (for whatever reason) the File resource simply doesn't properly support PsDscRunAsCredential.

Here's a demonstration using Invoke-DscResource, comparing File with Script and showing that the owner of a resulting file is different.

With File, the owner is always SYSTEM.

With Script, the owner is SYSTEM when run with no credential (expected), but when run with a credential, the owner is different (in my case, the owner became the local Administrators group, because the credential I supplied is a local admin).

$cred = Get-Credential

$module = 'PsDesiredStateConfiguration'

$fprop = @{
    DestinationPath = "$env:USERPROFILE\delme.txt"
    Contents = "Hello"
}

$sprop = @{
    GetScript = { @{} }
    TestScript = { $false }
    SetScript = [ScriptBlock]::Create("'Hello'|sc '$env:USERPROFILE\delme.txt'")
}

$cprop = @{ PsDscRunAsCredential = $cred }

function Assert-FileTest { Get-Item -LiteralPath $fprop.DestinationPath | % { $_.GetAccessControl().Owner | Write-Verbose -Verbose ; $_ } | Remove-Item -Force }

Invoke-DscResource -Name File -ModuleName $module -Method Set -Property $fprop -Verbose
Assert-FileTest

Invoke-DscResource -Name File -ModuleName $module -Method Set -Property ($fprop + $cprop) -Verbose
Assert-FileTest


Invoke-DscResource -Name Script -ModuleName $module -Method Set -Property $sprop -Verbose
Assert-FileTest

Invoke-DscResource -Name Script -ModuleName $module -Method Set -Property ($sprop + $cprop) -Verbose
Assert-FileTest
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@briantist is correct to point out that File is a special kind of resource... it is implemented in C++ as a WMI resource. The other in-the-box resources are implemented in PowerShell (with the exception of Log, which is implemented inside the DSC engine itself).

WMI resources did not gain popularity and File is the only resource that was implemented this way.

PsDscRunAsCredential was implemented for PowerShell resources, but not for WMI resources. That is the reason it does not work for File.

Also, the Credential property of File is more limited than PsDscRunAsCredential: it is used only to access files in a network share.

I will follow up to add this information to our documentation. Thank you for pointing this out.

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  • Thanks! I knew I read somewhere that File was implemented as WMI, but I couldn't for the life of me find any documentation that that was the case (or even possible) so I didn't include it. – briantist Apr 14 '18 at 18:39
  • Just to clarify, this currently means that all files created by the File resource in DSC will be owned by SYSTEM and there's no way to change that, is that correct? Are there any ways around this or has anyone implemented a replacement to the File resource in PowerShell that we can use instead? – Fotis Gimian Apr 7 '19 at 2:10
0

See the article ConfigData Credentials, specifically

DSC configuration resources run as Local System by default. However, some resources need a credential, for example when the Package resource needs to install software under a specific user account.

Earlier resources used a hard-coded Credential property name to handle this. WMF 5.0 added an automatic PsDscRunAsCredential property for all resources. For information about using PsDscRunAsCredential, see Running DSC with user credentials. Newer resources and custom resources can use this automatic property instead of creating their own property for credentials.

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  • The wording is a little bit inaccurate though isn't it? It says it "can use" this automatic property, but really the resource doesn't have a choice but to run under that context, as the LCM runs the resource's code in that user's context (it can accept credentials and use them manually instead). At least, this was my understanding of the feature; I assume you have much better knowledge being on the team. How / where does this break down? – briantist Apr 5 '18 at 0:29
  • I think the confusion comes from the distinction between the resource user who is writing configurations and the resource implementer who writes the code that implements the underlying resource logic. If you read the last line as "resource implementers can use this automatic property and avoid having to implement their own credential property/logic." is that clearer? In other words, prior to the introduction of the PsDscRunAsCredential (which is implemented in the LCM) every resource implementer had to code their own credential handing. – Bruce Payette Apr 8 '18 at 0:53
  • That is how I was reading it already; my point is that because PsDscRunAsCredential is implemented in the LCM, saying that the resource implementor uses it is something of a misnomer (the implementor doesn't actually do anything; in fact they cannot opt out of it, other than taking and using other explicit credentials). This also implies that any resource would work correctly with PsDscRunAsUser even if it were written before the feature existed, but it seems this isn't the case, which I suspect has more to do with the File resource than the feature itself. Thoughts on my answer? – briantist Apr 8 '18 at 1:25
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    @briantist you're correct. File is special in that it's implemented as a CIMv2 provider. This means that the generic out-of-process execution model used by RunAs can't work. (It only works for PowerShell script resources.) I asked @norbert-arrieta from the DSC team to verify this. Please see his answer. Thanks. – Bruce Payette Apr 12 '18 at 19:13

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