2

So I am trying to convert a grammar that defines variable definitions in a programming language. This is my first every prolog, and its very different from typical languages so I am confused. The grammar goes as follows:

S -> T S | T

T -> char F semicolon | int F semicolon

F -> id | id G

G -> comma F

So effectively it would return true for things like "char id semicolon" or "int id comma id semicolon char id semicolon".

I am trying to turn this into a prolog program to recognize this grammar. What I have so far is:

type([char|T],T).
type([int|T],T).
def([id|T], T).
com([comma|T], T).
semi([semicolon|T], T).

vardef(L,S) :-
  type(L,S1),
  def(S1,S2),
  comma(S2,S3),
  def(S3,S4),
  semi(S4,S).

variable_definition(L) :-
  vardef(L,[]).

However, this obviously only recognizes something that specifically "int/char id comma id semicolon". I don't know how to make it so it has a variable number of "id comma id" before a semicolon, or even have a full new variable definition after the first one. Other questions on this site about the same thing typically have to deal with grammars that are set in place like this, not ones that can have a variable amount of inputs.

EDIT: So the question is two-fold. First, how do I make it so it recognizes two different variable definitions, one right after the other. I assume I have to change the last line in order to complete this, but I am unsure how.

Second, how do I make it recognize a variable amount of "id"s followed by commas. So if I want it to recognize "char id semicolon" as well as "char id comma id semicolon".

  • What is TS? With this implementation method, you'd need to use recursion to recognize a variable number of id's followed by commas. Have you considered using a DCG, which would be ideal for this kind of program? – lurker Apr 5 '18 at 0:26
  • TS is a T followed by an S, ill add a space between them. Reason I'm not using DCG is we haven't gotten there yet in the class I am taking, so I didn't want to go ahead and potentially get graded down for not using the system as presented – bock.steve Apr 5 '18 at 0:30
5

The most natural way to express a grammar like this in Prolog is using Prolog's DCG notation:

S -> T S | T
T -> char F semicolon | int F semicolon
F -> id | id G
G -> comma F

s --> t, s | t.
t --> [char], f, [semicolon] | [int], f, [semicolon].
f --> [id] | [id], g.
g --> [comma], f.

The nice thing about DCG is that it expresses the notation more directly. You can then use phrase/2 to run it:

| ?- phrase(s, [char, id, semicolon]).

true ? ;

no

You can with this grammar, to some extent, generate valid phrases:

| ?- phrase(t, S).

S = [char,id,semicolon] ? ;

S = [char,id,comma,id,semicolon] ? ;

S = [char,id,comma,id,comma,id,semicolon] ? ;
...

However...

| ?- phrase(s, S).

Fatal Error: local stack overflow (size: 16384 Kb, reached: 16384 Kb,
environment variable used: LOCALSZ)

The word s is defined in such a way that it doesn't terminate. We can fix this by moving the recursive case later:

s --> t | t, s.

Then:

| ?- phrase(s, S).

S = [char,id,semicolon] ? ;

S = [char,id,comma,id,semicolon] ? ;

S = [char,id,comma,id,comma,id,semicolon] ? ;
...

You can see how this is implemented in standard notation by listing the Prolog code for the predicate:

| ?- listing(t).

% file: user

t(A, B) :-
        (   A = [char|C],
            f(C, D),
            D = [semicolon|B]
        ;   A = [int|E],
            f(E, F),
            F = [semicolon|B]
        ).

yes
| ?-

You could write this more succinctly as:

t([char|T], B) :-
    f(T, [semicolon|B]). 
t([int|T], B) :-
    f(T, [semicolon|B]).

Which would be called as t(L, []) (the equivalent result as phrase(t, L)).


If we list the rest of the predicates, you can get a complete solution in the form you are asking for:

| ?- listing.
s(A, B) :-
        (   t(A, B)
        ;   t(A, C),
            s(C, B)
        ).

t(A, B) :-
        (   A = [char|C],
            f(C, D),
            D = [semicolon|B]
        ;   A = [int|E],
            f(E, F),
            F = [semicolon|B]
        ).

f(A, B) :-
        (   A = [id|B]
        ;   A = [id|C],
            g(C, B)
        ).

g([comma|A], B) :-
        f(A, B).

Refactoring slightly (making it less verbose):

s(L, S) :-
    t(L, S).
s(L, S) :-
    t(L, S1),
    s(S1, S).

t([char|T], S) :-
    f(T, [semicolon|S]). 
t([int|T], S) :-
    f(T, [semicolon|S]).

f([id|S], S).
f([id|S1], S) :-
    g(S1, S).

g([comma|S1], S) :-
    f(S1, S).

And from here you can call: variable_definition(D) :- s(D, []).

  • While this is a great answer and a pretty succinct explanation of DCGs, something I probably should have mentioned is that this program needs to be executed in such a way like "variable_defintion([int, id, comma, id, comma, id, semicolon, char, id, semicolon])." and return true. So while your answer makes a lot of sense and works better, I currently am working in academia, which often makes little sense. – bock.steve Apr 5 '18 at 1:26
  • @bock.steve the answer I gave should easily be convertible to that kind of definition. If you were to show the standard predicate representation for each of the DCG rules I showed, they would be exactly the kinds of predicates you would want. If s is the main definition of a variable, then using the DCG it would be variable_definition(V) :- phrase(s, V)., or the equivalent conversion as described would be, variable_definition(V) :- s(V, []). – lurker Apr 5 '18 at 1:35
  • @bock.steve I added to my answer using the complete DCG conversion that I described. – lurker Apr 5 '18 at 1:44
  • Thank you very much for the help. While I was trying to find out why it was not working, I realized in my "green-ness" of prolog I wasn't even running the program properly. Fixed that and your solution worked great. – bock.steve Apr 5 '18 at 2:47

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