Using Perl, I have two similar syntax's,

if ($a && $b) { exit() }
do { exit() } if ($a && $b)

These I believe are supposed to be the same thing, however the top one creates a null vK opcode,

<1> null vK*/1 ->-

What is the significance of null vK and what does it do?

$ perl -MO=Concise -e'if ($a && $b) { exit() }'
8  <@> leave[1 ref] vKP/REFC ->(end)
1     <0> enter ->2
2     <;> nextstate(main 1 -e:1) v:{ ->3
-     <1> null vK/1 ->8
6        <|> and(other->7) vK/1 ->8
-           <1> null sK/1 ->6
4              <|> and(other->5) sK/1 ->8
-                 <1> ex-rv2sv sK/1 ->4
3                    <#> gvsv[*a] s ->4
-                 <1> ex-rv2sv sK/1 ->-
5                    <#> gvsv[*b] s ->6
-           <@> scope vK ->-
-              <;> ex-nextstate(main 3 -e:1) v ->7
7              <0> exit v* ->8
-e syntax OK

Verses the follow,

$ perl -MO=Concise -e'do { exit() } if ($a && $b)'
8  <@> leave[1 ref] vKP/REFC ->(end)
1     <0> enter ->2
2     <;> nextstate(main 1 -e:1) v:{ ->3
-     <1> null vK/1 ->8
6        <|> and(other->7) vK/1 ->8
-           <1> null sKP/1 ->6
4              <|> and(other->5) sK/1 ->8
-                 <1> ex-rv2sv sK/1 ->4
3                    <#> gvsv[*a] s ->4
-                 <1> ex-rv2sv sK/1 ->-
5                    <#> gvsv[*b] s ->6
-           <1> null vK*/1 ->-
-              <@> scope vK ->-
-                 <;> ex-nextstate(main 2 -e:1) v ->7
7                 <0> exit v* ->8
  • 1
    Or exit() if ($a && $b) – Ring Ø Apr 5 at 4:49
  • @RingØ that doesn't create a useless lexical scope in not creating a useless lexical scope it serves to distract from my question. – Evan Carroll Apr 5 at 5:28
up vote 5 down vote accepted

The "-" at the beginning of the line indicates the op won't get executed, which can also be seen using perl -MO=Concise,-exec.

That said, the null vK... or null sK... opcodes in B::Concise output doesn't mean that some ops have been optimized away. perldoc on B::Concise says clearly that such optimization is indicated by ex- in the output:

Nullops appear as "ex-opname", where opname is an op that has been optimized away by perl. They're displayed with a sequence-number of '-', because they are not executed (they don't appear in previous example), they're printed here because they reflect the parse.

For example:

> perl  -MO=Concise -e "$a"
4  <@> leave[1 ref] vKP/REFC ->(end)
1     <0> enter ->2
2     <;> nextstate(main 1 -e:1) v:{ ->3
-     **<1> ex-rv2sv vK/1 ->4**
3        <#> gvsv[*a] s ->4

So what are those nulls then?

They are the genuine nulls that come from the yacc grammar Perl uses to parse code, and they have not been intended for execution from the beginning.

In your case the excess null vk comes directly from the following do BLOCK grammar rule (perly.y):

termdo  :       DO term %prec UNIOP                     /* do $filename */
            { $$ = dofile($2, $1);}
    |   DO block    %prec '('               /* do { code */
            { $$ = newUNOP(OP_NULL, OPf_SPECIAL, op_scope($2));}
        ;

We can see it here:

>perl -MO=Concise -e "do{}"
4  <@> leave[1 ref] vKP/REFC ->(end)
1     <0> enter ->2
2     <;> nextstate(main 2 -e:1) v:{ ->3
-     <1> null vK*/1 ->4
-        <@> scope vK ->-
3           <0> stub v ->4

In other cases nulls come from yacc actions. Apparently, those nulls are used to help manage the op-tree, and since they are never executed, I think Perl developers don't bother about their presence.

Here is an example of null op arising from parsing of a boolean expression:

>perl  -MO=Concise -e "$a||$b"
6  <@> leave[1 ref] vKP/REFC ->(end)
1     <0> enter ->2
2     <;> nextstate(main 1 -e:1) v:{ ->3
-     <1> null vK/1 ->6
4        <|> or(other->5) vK/1 ->6
-           <1> ex-rv2sv sK/1 ->4
3              <#> gvsv[*a] s ->4
-           <1> ex-rv2sv vK/1 ->-
5              <#> gvsv[*b] s ->6

Why is a null here? Another snippet helps make it clear:

>perl -MO=Concise -e "!$a&&!$b"
7  <@> leave[1 ref] vKP/REFC ->(end)
1     <0> enter ->2
2     <;> nextstate(main 1 -e:1) v:{ ->3
6     <1> not vK/1 ->7
4        <|> or(other->5) sK/1 ->6
-           <1> ex-not sK/1 ->4
-              <1> ex-rv2sv sK/1 ->-
3                 <#> gvsv[*a] s ->4
-           <1> ex-not sK/1 ->6
-              <1> ex-rv2sv sK/1 ->-
5                 <#> gvsv[*b] s ->6

It appears that null vK has become not vK. Looking carefully, we can see that Perl optimized !$a&&!$b into !($a||$b) with not(!) taking place of null. It turns out that Perl always reserves a parent opcode for logical expressions, and if an expression can be simplified with outer not Perl puts not into the parent opcode, and null otherwise.

To summarize: NULL opcodes indicated by ex- in B::Concise output are made by the optimizer, and NULL opcodes indicated by null come from the grammar parser. Both of them are never executed and carry no performance penalties.

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