9

I wonder if it's possible to restrict keyframe animations to a scope based on classnames. The benefit would be to be able to use the same animation-name multiple times without getting issues. I couldn't find any infos about that..

In case it's not possible: are there any best practices to handle naming conflicts?

4
  • 1
    I used to use something like SCSS to generate automatically created names for my keyframes. They might not be as descriptive, but they ensure uniqueness. Something like $animation-id-count: 0 !default; @function animation-id{ $animation-id-count: $animation-id-count + 1; @return animation-id-#{$animation-id-count}; }, and then just use it like .class { $id: animation-id(); @keyframes #{$id}{ ...keyframes } }; animation: $id 1s infinite;. That way if you insert it anywhere else in your SCSS or move it, it will still match the right animation. Apr 5, 2018 at 9:20
  • 1
    That is an interesting way of handling naming issues - just did a test implementation and it worked fine. Trying to follow the itcss structure I hoped to find a way where I can put all animations in an extra scss file. That wouldn't be possible that way but thanks a lot for your suggestion. Have to think about going that way :)
    – Luckyfella
    Apr 5, 2018 at 9:45
  • @somethinghere it looks like scoping like I would like to do is not possible. Would you like to rewrite your comment as an answer and provide a full short example? Btw when incrementing the $animation-id-count inside the function I needed a !global at the end of the line otherwise each call returns the same (initial) value. Let me know if you would like to set up an answer - otherwise I could add an answer with example code. But you should get the credit of course!
    – Luckyfella
    Apr 6, 2018 at 9:42
  • I have added it as an answer. I was thinking about this and I am guessing that if you could find a way to track namespaces, you could use a function to figure out what animation-name to return, so this is a start. Also, good mention about !global, I used !default but indeed thats wrong. Apr 6, 2018 at 9:50

2 Answers 2

8

I used to use something like SCSS to generate automatically created names for my keyframes. They might not be as descriptive, but they ensure uniqueness. Something like:

$animation-id-count: 0 !global;

@function animation-id {

  $animation-id-count: $animation-id-count + 1;
  @return animation-id-#{$animation-id-count};

}

After this, just use the function in your code like this:

.class {

  $id: animation-id();

  @keyframes #{$id}{
    ...keyframes
  }

  animation: $id 1s infinite;

}

That way if you insert it anywhere else in your SCSS or move it, it will still match the right animation, and it stops namespaces from overlapping in any way.

4
  • 2
    Thank you for providing your answer!
    – Luckyfella
    Apr 6, 2018 at 9:53
  • 3
    This does not answer the question
    – Zaqx
    Jul 30, 2019 at 21:19
  • 2
    @zaqx “In case it's not possible: are there any best practices to handle naming conflicts?” - it is not possible, so heres how to avoid naming conflicts. Answers the question. Jul 31, 2019 at 6:42
  • @somethinghere "Can we restrict CSS keyframe animations to a scope" —Top of the page in large text. It’s even in the URL.
    – Zaqx
    Jul 31, 2019 at 18:52
0

Here is a JSX approach (you will need object-hash for that).

The following example shows how to define different animations with respective unique ID based on transform: scale(n). For that purpose, define a function which returns the keyframes and its ID. The keyframes ID is a custom string suffixed with a hash of the function options (e.g. the scale factor).

(Be careful of CSS custom identifier, e.g. do not include a . in your ID. See MDN: < custom-ident >.)

import hash from "object-hash";

const keyFramesScale = (options = {}) => {

    let { transforms, id, scale } = options;
    transforms = transforms || "";
    scale = scale || 1.25;

    const keyFramesId = `scale${id ? "-" + id : ""}-${hash(options).substring(0, 6)}`;
    const keyFrames = {
        [`@keyframes ${keyFramesId}`]: {
            "100%": {
                transform: `scale(${scale}) ${transforms}`,
            },
            "0%": {
                transform: `scale(1) ${transforms}`,
            }
        }
    };

    return [keyFramesId, keyFrames];
};

How to use it:

const [scaleUpId, keyFramesScaleUp] = keyFramesScale({ scale: 1.25, transforms: "rotate(-30deg)", id: "up" });
const [scaleDownId, keyFramesScaleDown] = keyFramesScale({ scale: 0.75, transforms: "rotate(-30deg)", id: "down" });

// scaleUpId = "scale-up-c61254"
// scaleDownId = "scale-down-6194d5"
// ...

<tag style={{
    ...keyFramesScaleUp,
    ...keyFramesScaleDown,
    ...(!hasTouchScreen && isActive && !isClicked && {
        animation: `${scaleUpId} 0.5s infinite alternate linear`,
        "&:hover": {
            animation: "none",
        },
    }),
    ...(isClicked && {
        animation: `${scaleDownId} .25s 1 linear`,
    }),
}} />

Of course, you can write a more generic function that hashes the whole key frames and assign it an ID based on that.

EDIT

To concretize what has been said, here is the generic approach. We first define a generic function that takes an animation name (e.g. scale, pulse, etc.), its keyframes (which can be an object or a function), and optionally keyframes parameters and its default values.

import hash from "object-hash";

const createKeyFramesId = (id, keyFrames) => {
    return `${id}-${hash(keyFrames).substring(0, 6)}`;
};

const genericKeyFrames = (name, keyFrames, defaults = {}, options = {}) => {

    if (typeof keyFrames === "function") {
        // The order of defaults & options is important: the latter overrides the former.
        keyFrames = keyFrames({ ...defaults, ...options });
    }

    const keyFramesId = createKeyFramesId(name, keyFrames);
    const keyFramesObject = {
        [`@keyframes ${keyFramesId}`]: keyFrames
    };
    return [keyFramesId, keyFramesObject];
};

From now on, we can define all kind of animations. Their usage is the same as above.

export const keyFramesPulse = () =>
    genericKeyFrames("pulse", {
        "100%": {
            opacity: "1",
        },
        "0%": {
            opacity: "0.5",
        },
    });

export const keyFramesRotate = (options = {}) => {
    const defaults = {
        rotate: 360,
        transforms: "",
    };

    const rotateKeyFrames = ({ rotate, transforms }) => {
        return {
            "100%": {
                transform: `rotate(${rotate}deg) ${transforms}`,
            }
        }
    };

    return genericKeyFrames(`rotate`, rotateKeyFrames, defaults, options);
};

export const keyFramesScale = (options = {}) => {

    const defaults = {
        scale: 1.25,
        transforms: ""
    };

    const scaleKeyFrames = ({ scale, transforms }) => {
        return {
            "100%": {
                transform: `scale(${scale}) ${transforms}`,
            },
            "0%": {
                transform: `scale(1) ${transforms}`,
            }
        }
    };

    return genericKeyFrames(`scale`, scaleKeyFrames, defaults, options);
};

What it looks like in DevTools:

enter image description here

2
  • Hi Firmin Martin, even though I was looking for a css/scss way of scoping - thanks for taking the time sharing your JS approach! For my type of projects it looks a bit 'overhead' but it certainly makes sense for JS apps as soon as they get bigger! Nice post, well written - thanks!
    – Luckyfella
    Nov 15, 2021 at 11:03
  • @Luckyfella Thanks! I came up with this approach as I'm using React + MUI (material-ui). Just realized that I mistakenly stated that this is a "JSS" solution: it's rather a "JSX" solution. I guess the main advantage of this solution is that the keyframes ID is human-readable. Nov 15, 2021 at 11:28

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