172

I am currently writing a deployment script that installs a number of Windows services.

The services names are versioned, so I want to delete the prior Windows service version as part of the installs of the new service.

How can I best do this in PowerShell?

15 Answers 15

290

You can use WMI or other tools for this since there is no Remove-Service cmdlet until Powershell 6.0 (See Remove-Service doc)

For example:

$service = Get-WmiObject -Class Win32_Service -Filter "Name='servicename'"
$service.delete()

Or with the sc.exe tool:

sc.exe delete ServiceName

Finally, if you do have access to PowerShell 6.0:

Remove-Service -Name ServiceName
6
  • 2
    You could also port the relevant part of this example to powershell (use the TransactedInstaller class): eggheadcafe.com/articles/20060104.asp However ravikanth's method is probably simpler.
    – JohnL
    Feb 11, 2011 at 10:57
  • 8
    More recent versions of PS have Remove-WmiObject, and beware of silent fails for $service.delete() - have added another answer with formatted examples.
    – Straff
    May 3, 2016 at 23:07
  • 1
    In short, most up to date version is to run Powershell As Administrator and run following: $service = Get-WmiObject -Class Win32_Service -Filter "Name='servicename'" $service | Remove-WmiObject
    – BamboOS
    Jun 28, 2017 at 14:53
  • For everyone's information, Straff's answer says "Beware of silent fails for $service.delete()"
    – sirdank
    Jul 6, 2017 at 13:53
  • Starting in Windows PowerShell 3.0, the cmdlet Get-WmiObject has been superseded by Get-CimInstance. So nowadays you can do this: Stop-Service 'servicename'; Get-CimInstance -ClassName Win32_Service -Filter "Name='servicename'" | Remove-CimInstance Apr 19, 2018 at 15:36
133

There's no harm in using the right tool for the job, I find running (from Powershell)

sc.exe \\server delete "MyService" 

the most reliable method that does not have many dependencies.

6
  • 66
    The .exe part is very important as sc on its own is an alias for Set-Content. Aug 29, 2013 at 14:13
  • @tjrobinson Thanks for that, I had omitted the .exe until I saw your comment. Now its working for me.
    – gwin003
    Oct 22, 2013 at 12:35
  • This is only useful if you have rights to the remote computer. If not (like in most secure environments) this won't work and you'll need something that supports passing in credentials Nov 3, 2015 at 15:48
  • The server name (\\server) is simply omitted if the service is local.
    – jpmc26
    Mar 24, 2017 at 21:15
  • 1
    this is better because it's more easily scriptable with % and $_ Jul 19, 2017 at 21:25
92

If you just want to check service existence:

if (Get-Service "My Service" -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue)
{
    "service exists"
}
22

I used the "-ErrorAction SilentlyContinue" solution but then later ran into the problem that it leaves an ErrorRecord behind. So here's another solution to just checking if the Service exists using "Get-Service".

# Determines if a Service exists with a name as defined in $ServiceName.
# Returns a boolean $True or $False.
Function ServiceExists([string] $ServiceName) {
    [bool] $Return = $False
    # If you use just "Get-Service $ServiceName", it will return an error if 
    # the service didn't exist.  Trick Get-Service to return an array of 
    # Services, but only if the name exactly matches the $ServiceName.  
    # This way you can test if the array is emply.
    if ( Get-Service "$ServiceName*" -Include $ServiceName ) {
        $Return = $True
    }
    Return $Return
}

[bool] $thisServiceExists = ServiceExists "A Service Name"
$thisServiceExists 

But ravikanth has the best solution since the Get-WmiObject will not throw an error if the Service didn't exist. So I settled on using:

Function ServiceExists([string] $ServiceName) {
    [bool] $Return = $False
    if ( Get-WmiObject -Class Win32_Service -Filter "Name='$ServiceName'" ) {
        $Return = $True
    }
    Return $Return
}

So to offer a more complete solution:

# Deletes a Service with a name as defined in $ServiceName.
# Returns a boolean $True or $False.  $True if the Service didn't exist or was 
# successfully deleted after execution.
Function DeleteService([string] $ServiceName) {
    [bool] $Return = $False
    $Service = Get-WmiObject -Class Win32_Service -Filter "Name='$ServiceName'" 
    if ( $Service ) {
        $Service.Delete()
        if ( -Not ( ServiceExists $ServiceName ) ) {
            $Return = $True
        }
    } else {
        $Return = $True
    }
    Return $Return
}
1
  • 7
    I decided to do a speed comparison between Get-WmiObject -Class Win32_Service -Filter "Name='$serviceName'" and Get-Service $serviceName -ErrorAction Ignore (which completely hides the error if the service doesn't exist) for completeness. I expected the Get-WmiObject might be faster because it doesn't throw an error. I was very wrong. Running each in a loop 100 times, Get-Service took 0.16 seconds while Get-WmiObject took 9.66 seconds. So Get-Service is 60x faster than Get-WmiObject. Mar 27, 2017 at 2:01
13

More recent versions of PS have Remove-WmiObject. Beware of silent fails for $service.delete() ...

PS D:\> $s3=Get-WmiObject -Class Win32_Service -Filter "Name='TSATSvrSvc03'"

PS D:\> $s3.delete()
...
ReturnValue      : 2
...
PS D:\> $?
True
PS D:\> $LASTEXITCODE
0
PS D:\> $result=$s3.delete()

PS D:\> $result.ReturnValue
2

PS D:\> Remove-WmiObject -InputObject $s3
Remove-WmiObject : Access denied 
At line:1 char:1
+ Remove-WmiObject -InputObject $s3
+ ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    + CategoryInfo          : InvalidOperation: (:) [Remove-WmiObject], ManagementException
    + FullyQualifiedErrorId : RemoveWMIManagementException,Microsoft.PowerShell.Commands.RemoveWmiObject

PS D:\> 

For my situation I needed to be running 'As Administrator'

10

To delete multiple services in Powershell 5.0, since remove service does not exist in this version

Run the below command

Get-Service -Displayname "*ServiceName*" | ForEach-object{ cmd /c  sc delete $_.Name}
5

One could use Where-Object

if ((Get-Service | Where-Object {$_.Name -eq $serviceName}).length -eq 1) { "Service Exists" }

4

Combining Dmitri & dcx's answers I made this:

function Confirm-WindowsServiceExists($name)
{   
    if (Get-Service $name -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue)
    {
        return $true
    }
    return $false
}

function Remove-WindowsServiceIfItExists($name)
{   
    $exists = Confirm-WindowsServiceExists $name
    if ($exists)
    {    
        sc.exe \\server delete $name
    }       
}
4

For single PC:

if (Get-Service "service_name" -ErrorAction 'SilentlyContinue'){(Get-WmiObject -Class Win32_Service -filter "Name='service_name'").delete()}

else{write-host "No service found."}

Macro for list of PCs:

$name = "service_name"

$list = get-content list.txt

foreach ($server in $list) {

if (Get-Service "service_name" -computername $server -ErrorAction 'SilentlyContinue'){
(Get-WmiObject -Class Win32_Service -filter "Name='service_name'" -ComputerName $server).delete()}

else{write-host "No service $name found on $server."}

}
3

To check if a Windows service named MySuperServiceVersion1 exists, even when you might not be sure of its exact name, you could employ a wildcard, using a substring like so:

 if (Get-Service -Name "*SuperService*" -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue)
{
    # do something
}
3

PowerShell Core (v6+) now has a Remove-Service cmdlet.

I don't know about plans to back-port it to Windows PowerShell, where it is not available as of v5.1.

Example:

# PowerShell *Core* only (v6+)
Remove-Service someservice

Note that invocation fails if the service doesn't exist, so to only remove it if it currently exists, you could do:

# PowerShell *Core* only (v6+)
$name = 'someservice'
if (Get-Service $name -ErrorAction Ignore) {
  Remove-Service $name
}
2
  • On PowerShell version 7, using the call to RemoteService gets the error "Remove-Service : The term 'Remove-Service' is not recognized as the name of a cmdlet, function, script file, or operable program" Jan 25 at 9:26
  • @PedroVicente, note that In the context of remoting, even PowerShell 7 still targets Windows PowerShell on remote machines - see this answer.
    – mklement0
    Jan 25 at 14:50
2

Adapted this to take an input list of servers, specify a hostname and give some helpful output

            $name = "<ServiceName>"
            $servers = Get-content servers.txt

            function Confirm-WindowsServiceExists($name)
            {   
                if (Get-Service -Name $name -Computername $server -ErrorAction Continue)
                {
                    Write-Host "$name Exists on $server"
                    return $true
                }
                    Write-Host "$name does not exist on $server"
                    return $false
            }

            function Remove-WindowsServiceIfItExists($name)
            {   
                $exists = Confirm-WindowsServiceExists $name
                if ($exists)
                {    
                    Write-host "Removing Service $name from $server"
                    sc.exe \\$server delete $name
                }       
            }

            ForEach ($server in $servers) {Remove-WindowsServiceIfItExists($name)}
2
  • For PowerShell versions prior to v6, you can do this:

    Stop-Service 'YourServiceName'; Get-CimInstance -ClassName Win32_Service -Filter "Name='YourServiceName'" | Remove-CimInstance
    
  • For v6+, you can use the Remove-Service cmdlet.

Observe that starting in Windows PowerShell 3.0, the cmdlet Get-WmiObject has been superseded by Get-CimInstance.

1

Windows Powershell 6 will have Remove-Service cmdlet. As of now the Github release shows PS v6 beta-9

Source: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/powershell/module/microsoft.powershell.management/remove-service?view=powershell-6

0

I know it's an old question but if someone is looking for one-liner:

On PS Version > 7.2

Wildcard search on the Name property

Get-Service *name* | Select-Object -First 1 | Remove-Service

Search the Display Name property

Get-Service -DisplayName "My Service Description" | Remove-Service

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.