-1

This question already has an answer here:

First of all i have to say i read lot of SO posts before coming to this one because I could not find what I was looking for or maybe I didn't understood. So here it goes

I kind of understand what Iterables and Iterators are. So any container object like Lists/Tuples/Sets which contains items, which you can iterate over are called Iterables. Now to iterate over the Iterables you need Iterators and the way it happens is because of __iter__ method which gives you the Iterator object for the type and then calling the __next__ on the Iterator object to extract the values.

So to make any object iterable you need to define iter and next methods, and i suppose that is true for Lists as well. But here comes the weird part which I discovered recently.

l1 = [1,2,3]
hasattr(l1, "__next__")
Out[42]: False
g = (x for x in range(3))
hasattr(g, "__next__")
Out[44]: True

Now because the lists do support Iterator protocol why the __next__ method is missing from their implementation, and if it indeed is missing then how does iteration for a list work ?

list_iterator = iter(l1)
next(list_iterator)
Out[46]: 1
next(list_iterator)
Out[47]: 2
next(list_iterator)
Out[48]: 3
next(list_iterator)
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "C:\Users\RJ\Anaconda3\lib\site-packages\IPython\core\interactiveshell.py", line 2910, in run_code
    exec(code_obj, self.user_global_ns, self.user_ns)
  File "<ipython-input-49-56e733bbb896>", line 1, in <module>
    next(list_iterator)
StopIteration

gen0_iterator = iter(g)
gen_iterator = iter(g)
next(gen_iterator)
Out[57]: 0
next(gen_iterator)
Out[58]: 1
next(gen_iterator)
Out[59]: 2
next(gen_iterator)
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "C:\Users\RJ\Anaconda3\lib\site-packages\IPython\core\interactiveshell.py", line 2910, in run_code
    exec(code_obj, self.user_global_ns, self.user_ns)
  File "<ipython-input-60-83622dd5d1b9>", line 1, in <module>
    next(gen_iterator)
StopIteration
gen_iterator1 = iter(g)
next(gen_iterator1)
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "C:\Users\RJ\Anaconda3\lib\site-packages\IPython\core\interactiveshell.py", line 2910, in run_code
    exec(code_obj, self.user_global_ns, self.user_ns)
  File "<ipython-input-62-86f9b3cc341f>", line 1, in <module>
    next(gen_iterator1)
StopIteration

I created an iterator for a list and then called next method on it to get the elements and it works.

  1. Now if the previous hasattr(a, "__next__") returns a False then how we are able to call next method on the iterator object for a list.

  2. Now the original question which made me think all this, no matter how many times i iterate over the list, it doesn't exhaust and calling the iter() gives back a new iterator object everytime, but in case of generator this does not happen, and once the generator has exhausted, no matter how many times you call iter() it will always gives you back the same object which already has raised the StopIteration exception and again this is true because an iterator once raised a StopIteration, it always will, but why it does not happen with lists.

Further this is in sync with what python docs says for conatiner.__ iter__ that container.__iter__ gives you the iterator object for the type and iterator.__ iter__ and iterator.__iter__ gives you the iterator object itself, which is precisely the reason that calling the iter() on generator returns the same object over and over again. But why and more importantly how ?

One more thing to observe here is

isinstance(l1 , collections.Iterator)
Out[65]: False
isinstance(g , collections.Iterator)
Out[66]: True

So this suggests that there is some implementation difference b/w Iterables and Iterators, but i could not find any such details, because both have __iter__ and __next__ methods implemented, so from where does this variation in behavior comes. So is it that __iter__ for iterables returns something different from what is returned by __iter__ of iterables(generators). If some can explain with some examples of __iter__ for Iterables and Iterataors that would be really helpful. Finally some puzzle about yield, since that is the magic word which makes a normal function a generator (so a type of iterator), so what does __iter__ and __next__ of `yield looks like.

I have tried my level best to explain the question, but if still something is missing, please do let me know i will try to clarify my question.

marked as duplicate by Martijn Pieters python-3.x Apr 5 '18 at 20:38

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • Because tuples and lists are sequences, so can be indexed at random. Iterators are not sequences, and you can create iterators for many more things than just sequences. Like an infinite counter. Sequences are iterable, meaning that you can create (new) iterators for them. – Martijn Pieters Apr 5 '18 at 20:31
  • As to why list doesn't have a __next__(), iterable objects aren't required to have __next__(); they just need __iter__(). The object returned by __iter__() has to have a __next__() method. – glibdud Apr 5 '18 at 20:34
  • to make any object iterable you need to define __iter__ and __next__ methods: no, you only need the __iter__ method. Iterators need __next__, iterables do not. – Martijn Pieters Apr 5 '18 at 20:35
  • In other words: you have the iterable and iterator types confused. Iterable --> can potentially be iterated over, you can produce an iterator for this object. Iterator --> the object doing the iterating. – Martijn Pieters Apr 5 '18 at 20:39
  • Iterable -> you use the __iter__ method to produce the iterator. iterator -> you use the __next__ method to do the iterating. Iterators also have a __iter__ method, because that makes it so much easier to handle both types (just call iter() on either and you know you have something with a __next__ method returned). – Martijn Pieters Apr 5 '18 at 20:40
0

Its a bit different than that. iterables have an __iter__ method that returns an iterator. iterators have a __next__ method (and usually also have __iter__ so that iter() works on them - but that's not required).

Lists are iterable:

>>> l = [1,2,3]
>>> hasattr(l, "__iter__")
True
>>> hasattr(l, "__next__")
False
>>> l_iter = iter(l)
>>> hasattr(l_iter, "__next__")
True
>>> hasattr(l_iter, "__iter__")
True
>>> l_iter == iter(l_iter)
True

And give you new iterators that run through the e each time you use them

>>> list(l)
[1, 2, 3]
>>> list(l)
[1, 2, 3]
>>> l_iter = iter(l)
>>> list(l_iter)
[1, 2, 3]
>>> list(l_iter)
[]
 each time you use them

>>> list(l)
[1, 2, 3]
>>> list(l)
[1, 2, 3]
>>> iter(l) == iter(l)
False

But the list iterator itself is one shot

>>> l_iter = iter(l)
>>> list(l_iter)
[1, 2, 3]
>>> list(l_iter)
[]

The generator is an iterator, not an iterable and is also one shot.

>>> g = (x for x in range(3))
>>> hasattr(g, "__iter__")
True
>>> hasattr(g, "__next__")
True
>>> g == iter(g)
True
>>> 
>>> list(g)
[0, 1, 2]
>>> list(g)
[]
  • So if i understand correctly, the __iter__ of an iterartor returns itself that's why l_iter == iter(l_iter) returns True, but __iter__ of an iterables returns a fresh iterator every time correct ? So can you give example of how __iter__ of list class looks like maybe ? – Rohit Apr 6 '18 at 6:03
  • Yes. Its python so people can do crazy things but the advantage of an iterator returning itself is that something like an inner for keeps consuming the data. Iterables tend to pass unique iterators so that different for 's don't interfere with each other. I'll see what I can work up. – tdelaney Apr 6 '18 at 6:34

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.