3

My goal is to give css styling to a class for only one specific user role.

Essentially I want the logo in the header of my site to be different when a wholesale buyer logs in since we sell all of our lines through one of our brand sites in a wholesale store.

In this case the user role would be Wholesale Customer and the theme is Avada 5.4.2

https://avada.theme-fusion.com/hosting/ is an example of a site using the same theme. I would like it so that when a user is logged in to the Wholesale Customer role the Avada Hosting logo would have a CSS class applied to it.

The CSS would be

img.fusion-standard-logo {
  box-sizing: border-box;
  background: url(http://notrealdomain2.com/newlogo.png) no-repeat;
  width: 165px; 
  height: 70px; 
  padding-left: 180px;
}

This essentially (in a very non poetic way) hides the existing logo and replaces it with a background image which would be the logo I need.

1

My first answer provides a method of adding a body class, and using that as a CSS selector, which I still think has merit (and arguably may be a better way to go abot it), so I'm keeping it posted, however I'd like to propose another method:

You could force a <style> tag into the header and overwrite the current logo that way, if the current user has your desired role (in this case, a custom role wholesale_customer?)

add_action( 'wp_enqueue_scripts', 'wholesale_customer_logo' );
function wholesale_customer_logo(){
    if( in_array( 'wholesale_customer', (array) wp_get_current_user()->roles ) ){
        echo '<style>
            img.fusion-standard-logo {
                background: url(http://example.com/logo-for-wholesale-customers.png) no-repeat;
            }
        </style>';
    }
}
  • Worked perfect thank you - all I had to do was add my additional styles from my original question. This will also be useful for others who are trying to make specific styling changes to users based on their roles. – DaveDoesDev Apr 6 '18 at 13:18
6

You could add the current user's role to the body using the body_class filter. You can put this code in your theme's functions.php file.

Note: If you're not using a child theme, and your premium theme updates, you may lose the changes you made; in which case putting the code in a MU-Plugin file, or using a PHP insertion plugin would be a better bet. I've had a decent experience with the My Custom Functions in the past.

add_filter( 'body_class', 'add_role_to_body_class' );
function add_role_to_body_class( $classes ) {
    $current_user = wp_get_current_user();
    $current_role = (array) $current_user->roles;

    if( $current_role[0] ){
        $classes[] = 'user-role-'.$current_role[0];
    }

    return $classes;
}

This would allow you to use that in your css selector:

.fusion-standard-logo {
    box-sizing: border-box;
    background: url(http://example.com/logo.png) no-repeat;
    width: 165px; 
    height: 70px; 
    padding-left: 180px;
}

.user-role-author .fusion-standard-logo {
    background: url(http://example.com/logo-for-authors.png) no-repeat;
}

.user-role-wholesale_customer .fusion-standard-logo {
    background: url(http://example.com/logo-for-wholesale_customers.png) no-repeat;
}

Minor Function Update:

Here's a more succinct function for you, that will also accommodate the rare case of multiple roles on a user:

add_filter( 'body_class', function( $classes ){
    foreach( (array) wp_get_current_user()->roles as $role ){
        $classes[] = "user-role-$role";
    }
    return $classes;
});
0

I would say you can hook into the action wp_enqueue_scripts.

There you can check if the user is logged in and if he has certain role, and use wp_enqueue_style() for the corresponding css file.

Note that for a child theme, instead of get_template_directory_uri() you should use get_stylesheet_directory_uri() to reference the child theme root.

function css_role_based(){
    if(is_user_logged_in()){
      $user = wp_get_current_user();
      if ( in_array( 'wholesale_customer', (array) $user->roles ) ) {
            //The user has the "wholesale_customer" role
            wp_enqueue_style('style_1', get_template_directory_uri() . '/css/my_custom_css_1.js');
      }else{
            wp_enqueue_style('style_2', get_template_directory_uri() . '/css/my_custom_css_2.js');
      }
    }else{
        wp_enqueue_style('style_other', get_template_directory_uri() . '/css/my_custom_css_other.js');
    }
}

add_action( 'wp_enqueue_scripts', 'css_role_based' );

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