86

For example:

Given time: 08:22 => Rounded to: 08:15

Given time: 08:23 => Rounded to: 08:30

Should be pretty simple. But all I was able to produce is lengthy, not very good code to solve the issue. My mind's just gone blank.

Regards

1

12 Answers 12

120

Given that you have hours and minutes in variables (if you don't you can get them from the Date instance anyway by using Date instance functions):

var m = (parseInt((minutes + 7.5)/15) * 15) % 60;
var h = minutes > 52 ? (hours === 23 ? 0 : ++hours) : hours;

minutes can as well be calculated by using Math.round():

var m = (Math.round(minutes/15) * 15) % 60;

or doing it in a more javascript-sophisticated expression without any functions:

var m = (((minutes + 7.5)/15 | 0) * 15) % 60;
var h = ((((minutes/105) + .5) | 0) + hours) % 24;

You can check the jsPerf test that shows Math.round() is the slowest of the three while mainly the last one being the fastest as it's just an expression without any function calls (no function call overhead i.e. stack manipulation, although native functions may be treated differently in Javascript VM). //----

11
  • 1
    Speed is not an issue in my case. Don't need to worry here. Thanks for you help. Commented Feb 11, 2011 at 12:22
  • 1
    Should this be ++hours rather than hours++? As in its current form hour is incremented AFTER that line executes, which means the h variable gets the un-incremented/incorrect value.
    – elwyn
    Commented Jun 27, 2011 at 2:39
  • @evelyn: you're correct. I edited my code. Thanks for pointing out such an obscure flaw that could baffle many non-seasoned developers. Commented Jun 27, 2011 at 12:34
  • Since you don't use hours later, or need the side effect from the ++, just put hours+1 and avoid all problems.
    – NetMage
    Commented May 13, 2013 at 22:29
  • 1
    @MichaelRushton: Thanks Mike. I also added a function-less calculation that may be too sophisticated to many, but it's likely the fastest of the three. Commented Jul 17, 2013 at 9:16
35

This function round the time to the nearest quarter hour.

function roundTimeQuarterHour(time) {
    var timeToReturn = new Date(time);

    timeToReturn.setMilliseconds(Math.round(timeToReturn.getMilliseconds() / 1000) * 1000);
    timeToReturn.setSeconds(Math.round(timeToReturn.getSeconds() / 60) * 60);
    timeToReturn.setMinutes(Math.round(timeToReturn.getMinutes() / 15) * 15);
    return timeToReturn;
}
4
  • 7
    You're a hero for this method! For anyone like me that needs the next 15 minutes, you can use 'Math.ceil' instead
    – ricks
    Commented Jun 12, 2018 at 21:06
  • 4
    can you not just set Milliseconds(0) and setSeconds(0)? like your solution nonetheless
    – Rick
    Commented Aug 28, 2019 at 13:07
  • 1
    Can be simplified even further timeToReturn.setMinutes(/*min=*/Math.round(timeToReturn.getMinutes() / 15) * 15, /*sec=*/0, /*ms=*/0);
    – sleighty
    Commented Feb 7, 2023 at 1:58
  • In date-fns you can make the same with roundToNearestMinutes(new Date(), { nearestTo: 15, roundingMethod: "ceil" })
    – Michael
    Commented Jun 17 at 11:04
22

With Time String

Here is a method that will round a time string like the one you presented. Eg "08:22"

let roundTime = (time, minutesToRound) => {

    let [hours, minutes] = time.split(':');
    hours = parseInt(hours);
    minutes = parseInt(minutes);

    // Convert hours and minutes to time in minutes
    time = (hours * 60) + minutes; 

    let rounded = Math.round(time / minutesToRound) * minutesToRound;
    let rHr = ''+Math.floor(rounded / 60)
    let rMin = ''+ rounded % 60

    return rHr.padStart(2, '0')+':'+rMin.padStart(2, '0')
}

// USAGE //

// Round time to 15 minutes
roundTime('8:07', 15); // "08:00"
roundTime('7:53', 15); // "08:00"
roundTime('7:52', 15); // "07:45"

With Hours and Minutes Already Split Up

You can use this method if you don't need to parse out the hour and minute strings like your example shows

let roundTime = (hours, minutes, minutesToRound) => {

    // Convert hours and minutes to minutes
    time = (hours * 60) + minutes; 
    let rounded = Math.round(time / minutesToRound) * minutesToRound;

    let roundedHours = Math.floor(rounded / 60)
    let roundedMinutes = rounded % 60

    return { hours: roundedHours, minutes: roundedMinutes }
}

// USAGE //

// Round time to 15 minutes
roundTime(7, 52, 15); // {hours: 7, minutes: 45}
roundTime(7, 53, 15); // {hours: 8, minutes: 0}
roundTime(1, 10, 15); // {hours: 1, minutes: 15}

With Existing Date Object

Or, if you are looking to round an already existing date object to the nearest x minutes, you can use this method.

If you don't give it any date it will round the current time. In your case, you can round to the nearest 15 minutes.

let getRoundedDate = (minutes, d=new Date()) => {

  let ms = 1000 * 60 * minutes; // convert minutes to ms
  let roundedDate = new Date(Math.round(d.getTime() / ms) * ms);

  return roundedDate
}


// USAGE //

// Round existing date to 5 minutes
getRoundedDate(15, new Date()); // 2018-01-26T00:45:00.000Z

// Get current time rounded to 30 minutes
getRoundedDate(30); // 2018-01-26T00:30:00.000Z
1
  • 4
    Great answer, with details, options and examples! Thanks.
    – johnpyp
    Commented Oct 8, 2018 at 15:21
9

Divide by 9e5 milliseconds (15 * 60 * 1000), round, and multiply back by 9e5 :

const roundToQuarter = date => new Date(Math.round(date / 9e5) * 9e5)

console.log( roundToQuarter(new Date("1999-12-31T23:52:29.999Z")) ) // 1999-12-31T23:45:00

console.log( roundToQuarter(new Date("1999-12-31T23:52:30.000Z")) ) // 2000-01-01T00:00:00

console.log( roundToQuarter(new Date) )

7

The code here is a little verbose but I'm sure you'll see how you could combine the lines to make this shorter. I've left it this way to clearly show the steps:

var now = new Date();
var mins = now.getMinutes();
var quarterHours = Math.round(mins/15);
if (quarterHours == 4)
{
    now.setHours(now.getHours()+1);
}
var rounded = (quarterHours*15)%60;
now.setMinutes(rounded);
document.write(now);
8
  • you will have to add an hour when going up an hour. Commented Feb 11, 2011 at 11:17
  • 1
    @Robert Koritnik: Yeah, realised that after I posted.
    – Lazarus
    Commented Feb 11, 2011 at 11:18
  • 1
    this will leave the seconds, and milliseconds field not rounded.
    – Lorenz03Tx
    Commented Nov 19, 2014 at 21:41
  • @Lorenz03Tx A little outside the scope of the question, feel free to take my answer and expand in an answer of your own.
    – Lazarus
    Commented Nov 21, 2014 at 16:59
  • 1
    there is an issue in it that it will not change the date if time is 11:46PM Commented Nov 14, 2017 at 10:47
2

I use these code:

function RoundUp(intervalMilliseconds, datetime){
    datetime = datetime || new Date();
    var modTicks = datetime.getTime() % intervalMilliseconds;
    var delta = modTicks === 0 ? 0  : datetime.getTime() - modTicks;
    delta += intervalMilliseconds;
    return new Date(delta);
}

function RoundDown(intervalMilliseconds, datetime){
    datetime = datetime || new Date();
    var modTicks = datetime.getTime() % intervalMilliseconds;
    var delta = modTicks === 0 ? 0  : datetime.getTime() - modTicks;
    return new Date(delta);
}

function Round(intervalMilliseconds, datetime){
    datetime = datetime || new Date();
    var modTicks = datetime.getTime() % intervalMilliseconds;
    var delta = modTicks === 0 ? 0  : datetime.getTime() - modTicks;
    var shouldRoundUp = modTicks > intervalMilliseconds/2;
    delta += shouldRoundUp ? intervalMilliseconds : 0;
    return new Date(delta);
}

Round to the nearest 5 minutes:

//with current datetime
var result = Round(5 * 60 * 1000);

//with a given datetime
var dt = new Date();
var result = Round(5 * 60 * 1000, dt);
0

There is an NPM package @qc/date-round that can be used. Given that you have a Date instance to be rounded

import { round } from '@qc/date-round'

const dateIn = ...; // The date to be rounded
const interval = 15 * 60 * 1000; // 15 minutes (aka quarter hour)
const dateOut = round(dateIn, interval)

Then you can use date-fns to format the date

import format from 'date-fns/format';

console.log(format(dateOut, 'HH:mm')) // 24-hr
console.log(format(dateOut, 'hh:mm a')) // 12-hr
0

Another one with date-fns (not mandatory)

import {getMinutes, setMinutes, setSeconds, setMilliseconds} from 'date-fns'

let date = new Date();
let min = getMinutes(date);
let interval = 3  // in minutes
let new_min = min - min%interval + interval;
let new_date = setMilliseconds(setSeconds(setMinutes(date,new_min),0),0)

console.log('Orignal Date : ' + date);
console.log('Original Minute : ' + min);
console.log('New Minute : ' + new_min);
console.log('New Date : ' + new_date);
0

Pass the interval in milliseconds get the next cycle in roundUp order

Example if I want next 15 minute cycle from current time then call this method like *calculateNextCycle(15 * 60 * 1000);*

Samething for quarter hour pass the interval

function calculateNextCycle(interval) {
    const timeStampCurrentOrOldDate = Date.now();
    const timeStampStartOfDay = new Date().setHours(0, 0, 0, 0);
    const timeDiff = timeStampCurrentOrOldDate - timeStampStartOfDay;
    const mod = Math.ceil(timeDiff / interval);
    return new Date(timeStampStartOfDay + (mod * interval));
}

console.log(calculateNextCycle(15 * 60 * 1000));

0

This method is specifically for Vue.js, it takes a time, and returns to the nearest entered increment, I based this on an above answer, but this is for Vue specifically using echma-6 standards. It will return T:06:00:00, if you fed 06:05 into it. This is used specifically with vuetify's v-calendar to choose a time in weeklyor daily format.

This answer also adds the 0 for like 06 hrs. Which is where this differs from the above answers. If you change the 30 to 15

methods: {
  roundTimeAndFormat(datetime, roundTo) {
    const hrsMins = datetime.split(':')
    let min = ((((hrsMins[1] + 7.5) / roundTo) | 0) * roundTo) % 60
    let hr = (((hrsMins[1] / 105 + 0.5) | 0) + hrsMins[0]) % 24
    if (Number(hr) < 10) {
      hr = ('0' + hr).slice(-2)
    }
    if (min === 0) {
      min = ('0' + min).slice(-2)
    }
    return 'T' + hr + ':' + min + ':00'
  }
}

You would just call:

this.roundTimeAndFormat(dateTime, 15)

And you would get the time to the nearest 15min interval. If you enter, 11:01, you'd get T11:00:00

0

In date-fns, you can make: roundToNearestMinutes(new Date(), { nearestTo: 15, roundingMethod: "ceil" })

-1

Might help others. For any language. Mainly trick with round function.

roundedMinutes = yourRoundFun(Minutes / interval) * interval

E.g. The interval could be 5 minutes, 10 minutes, 15 minutes, 30 minutes. Then rounded minutes can be reset to the respective date.

yourDateObj.setMinutes(0) 
yourDateObj.setMinutes(roundedMinutes)

also if required then

yourDateObj.setSeconds(0) 
yourDateObj.setMilliSeconds(0) 

Simple?

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