12

So today I did found out that with the release of pip 10.x.x the req package changed its directory and can now be found under pip._internal.req.

Since it is common practice to use the parse_requirements function in your setup.py to install all the dependencies out of a requirements file I now wonder if this practice should change since it is now lying under _internal?

Or what is actually best practice without using parse_requirements?

5
10

First, I believe parsing requirements.txt from within setup.py is not a good idea. It should be the other way around, install_requires in setup.py or setup.cfg should be considered as some kind of source of truth, and files such as requirements.txt should be generated from there. But everyone has different needs, that lead to different workflows.

So with that said...

It is possible to parse a relatively simple requirements.txt file from a setuptools setup.py script without pip. The setuptools project already contains necessary tools in its top level package pkg_resources.

It could more or less look like this:

#!/usr/bin/env python3

import pathlib

import pkg_resources
import setuptools

with pathlib.Path('requirements.txt').open() as requirements_txt:
    install_requires = [
        str(requirement)
        for requirement
        in pkg_resources.parse_requirements(requirements_txt)
    ]

setuptools.setup(
    install_requires=install_requires,
)

Again, this will work only for simple requirements.txt files. See Requirements parsing in the documentation page for pkg_resources to get details about what is handled. In short, each line should be a valid PEP 508 requirement. Notations that are really specific to pip are not handled.


Notes:

3
  • 1
    This doesn't handle complex entries like -r extra_req.txt. The options importing from pip do solve these cases, but they have other problems. – AlanSE Jul 27 '20 at 20:46
  • Yes, it is true. The answer states "parse a relatively simple requirements.txt file" on purpose, it could be more explicit about it. – sinoroc Jul 27 '20 at 21:02
  • 1
    Note that while the "Requirements parsing" link doesn't explicitly say, it does appear to handle comments in the requirements.txt file. – pavon Apr 1 at 20:12
8

The solution of Scrotch only works until pip 19.0.3, in the pip >= 20 versions the PipSession module was refactored. Here is a solution for the imports that works for all pip versions:

try:
    # pip >=20
    from pip._internal.network.session import PipSession
    from pip._internal.req import parse_requirements
except ImportError:
    try:
        # 10.0.0 <= pip <= 19.3.1
        from pip._internal.download import PipSession
        from pip._internal.req import parse_requirements
    except ImportError:
        # pip <= 9.0.3
        from pip.download import PipSession
        from pip.req import parse_requirements
3
  • 2
    The solution of @sinoroc is clean. However, if using tools like pip-tools to create your requirements.txt file, items such as --trusted-host may be introduced in the requirements.txt file, which the pkg_resources package fails to parse. – sh0rtcircuit Jan 31 '20 at 12:25
  • 1
    Haven't tested it, but I have no doubt you're right. When working with tools such as pip-tools, then I don't see the point of parsing requirements.txt from within setup.py, the tools should read setup.py or setup.cfg to generate requirements.txt, not the the other way around. But I guess everyone has their own needs for different workflows. – sinoroc Apr 8 '20 at 9:18
  • This is less useful than what it looks like. Presumably you want to actually use it, like [r.requirement for r in parse_requirements(filename, session=PipSession())]. That works for pip >=20, but does not work for 9.0.3. Does anyone have a cross-version compatible way of getting the lines back out of this? In any form. – AlanSE Jul 30 '20 at 15:19
5

What I figured out the right way to do is adding the dependencies in the setup.py like:

REQUIRED_PACKAGES = [
    'boto3==1.7.33'
]

if __name__ == '__main__':
    setup(
        ...
        install_requires=REQUIRED_PACKAGES,
        ...
    )

and just have a . in your requirements.txt. It will then automatically install all packages from the setup.py if you install from the file.

4

I don't agree with the accepted answer. The setup.py file can get ugly real fast if you have a large project with a lot of dependencies. It is always good practice to keep your requirements in a separate .txt file. I would do something like this -

try:  # for pip >= 10
    from pip._internal.req import parse_requirements
    from pip._internal.download import PipSession
except ImportError:  # for pip <= 9.0.3
    from pip.req import parse_requirements
    from pip.download import PipSession

requirements = parse_requirements(os.path.join(os.path.dirname(__file__), 'requirements.txt'), session=PipSession())

if __name__ == '__main__':
    setup(
        ...
        install_requires=[str(requirement.requirement) for requirement in requirements],
        ...
    )

Throw in all your requirements in requirements.txt under project root directory.

1
  • 2
    I mean how you load the list of packages into your setup.py is a complete other topic. You can import that from another file that lives somewhere else. But i still think it is wrong to be dependend on the pip library in your own application. If you dont want to have the package list inside your setup.py put it in any other file put it into a constant and import that into your setup.py – muthan Jul 24 '19 at 22:12
0
with open("requirements.txt") as f:
    dependencies = [line for line in f if "==" in line]

setup(
    install_requires=dependencies
)

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