18

Say I have the following code:

def func(a,b):
    return (func2(a),func3(3))

def paralel_func(alist,blist)
    with ThreadPoolExecutor(max_workers=None) as executor:
        executor.map(func,alist,blist)

How do I access the return values that were returned from func ? I tried to figure it out myself by thinking that executor.map is a list that holds the values but that didnt work for me.

4
  • Where is func2?It is not clear what you really want. Apr 6, 2018 at 10:11
  • func2 and func3 are arbitrary non-parallel functions, that return a value which I'd like to access after I have done my computations
    – zython
    Apr 6, 2018 at 10:14
  • 2
    For what it's worth, if your operation is CPU bound, then you probably don't want to use a thread pool because of Python's Global Interpreter Lock (GIL)
    – Skam
    Apr 5, 2020 at 19:31
  • 1
    FYI for those coming here primarily to parallelize I/O tasks, the GIL actually gets released, so @Skam's comment doesn't apply in that case. Oct 7, 2022 at 21:14

5 Answers 5

7

I don't know where your alist and blist variables are coming from, but you could do something like this.

import concurrent.futures

def func(a, b):
    return (func2(a),func3(3))

def parallel_func(alist, blist):
    processes = []
    with concurrent.futures.ThreadPoolExecutor(max_workers=None) as executor:
        processes.append(executor.submit(func, alist, blist))
        
        for _ in concurrent.futures.as_completed(processes):
            print('Result: ', _.result())
4
  • ThreadPoolExecutor.map doesn't return futures, so this approach won't work. See my answer for clarification. Oct 8, 2022 at 0:36
  • @knightofiam it's been a while so I'm not sure why I put executor.map in there, but just switching it to executor.submit works perfectly.
    – NL23codes
    Oct 10, 2022 at 15:03
  • Unfortunately your example doesn't compile, and even fixing those errors, it has runtime errors because submit doesn't map list elements into function parameters. I'm not sure if you downvoted my answer, but if there's something wrong with it please leave a comment explaining why, thanks. Oct 11, 2022 at 0:59
  • @knightofiam There was just a typo. Maybe I pasted something and "import" made it into my with statement. I updated it and it works fine.
    – NL23codes
    Dec 28, 2022 at 16:23
3

This answer to a 4 year old question is for posterity, as there seems to be a lot of confusion around python multithreading and correctly obtaining results from worker threads. I know there was for me anyway. So when I figured it out, I wanted to provide a complete answer here that will hopefully help someone else.

First off, you can remove the redundant parentheses from return (func2(a),func3(3)). Python knows you're returning a tuple solely from the use of the comma, as stated in the documentation.

Elaborating on @Roland Smith's correct, yet incomplete answer:

ThreadPoolExecutor.map returns an iterator - of tuples in your case - that may evaluate your function calls out of order, but will always return the results in order. While an iterator works well in a for loop to stream single items one-by-one, if you want to collect all the iterator's results into a list, for example, all you have to do is wrap the iterator in a list:

(Note: Pseudocode, doesn't compile, see full examples further down)

from concurrent.futures import ThreadPoolExecutor

def func(a, b):
    return func2(a), func3(3)

def paralel_func(alist, blist):
    with ThreadPoolExecutor(max_workers=None) as executor:
        results = list(executor.map(func, alist, blist))
        # Print list of tuples, one tuple per line with values separated by commas.
        print('\n'.join(str(x[0]) + ', ' + str(x[1]) for x in results))

In your example code, it's not clear what the return types of your two mapped functions, func2 & func3 are, whether lists, tuples, single values, etc, but assuming single values, in the above code, results will contain a list of tuples. If your return types are integers, the print statement above will convert them to strings.

@NL23codes' answer is a bit misleading because ThreadPoolExecutor.map doesn't work with concurrent.futures.as_completed because it doesn't return Future's. For that you would want ThreadPoolExecutor.submit which is only for one value at a time, so you would need to manually iterate over alist & blist. I provide a full working example of this below.

@Richard Rublev's answer, while incomplete, provides an insight that one cannot naively iterate over alist & blist in a nested fashion, as this passes every possible permutation of values from alist & blist as tuples, resulting in 9 different results, whereas map simply passes the first value from alist & the first value from blist as a tuple, and so on, resulting in 3 different results. Therefore the correct way to replicate the map behavior with submit is to use zip to combine the two lists before iterating. I provide a full working example of this below.

Notes:

  1. I fixed the mispelling of the word "parallel" in paralel_func.
  2. I changed the func3(3) call to func3(b) in func(a, b), just for testing purposes, to demonstrate the use of of b values.
  3. I included example definitions func2a & func2b for the sake of providing full working examples.

Full working example using submit & zip with futures:

import concurrent.futures
from concurrent.futures import ThreadPoolExecutor


def func2(a):
    return a + 5


def func3(b):
    return b


def func(a, b):
    return func2(a), func3(b)


def parallel_func(alist, blist):
    with ThreadPoolExecutor(max_workers=None) as executor:
        processes = []
        for a, b in zip(alist, blist):
            processes.append(executor.submit(func, a, b))
        results = concurrent.futures.as_completed(processes)
        # Print list of tuples, one tuple per line with values separated by commas.
        print('\n'.join(str(x.result()[0]) + ', ' + str(x.result()[1]) for x in results))


parallel_func([1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6])

Sample output (notice that submit results can be out of order):

6, 4
8, 6
7, 5

Full working example using map without futures:

from concurrent.futures import ThreadPoolExecutor


def func2(a):
    return a + 5


def func3(b):
    return b


def func(a, b):
    return func2(a), func3(b)


def parallel_func(alist, blist):
    with ThreadPoolExecutor(max_workers=None) as executor:
        results = list(executor.map(func, alist, blist))
        # Print list of tuples, one tuple per line with values separated by commas.
        print('\n'.join(str(x[0]) + ', ' + str(x[1]) for x in results))


parallel_func([1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6])

Sample output (notice that map results will always be in order):

6, 4
7, 5
8, 6

Finally, please note, as @Skam mentioned in his comment on your question, examples like these that are CPU-bound are actually prohibited from being multithreaded due to the Global Interpreter Lock, or GIL. However, if you are trying to parallelize I/O tasks, such as scraping or downloading from websites, the GIL gets released, so this approach can yield very significant speed increases.

1

May be you should try this

ablists = [alist, blist]

with concurrent.futures.ThreadPoolExecutor(max_workers=3) as executor:
    future_list= {executor.submit(func, a, b): i for i in ablists}

You can read more here about futures and also executors

3
  • wouldnt I have to loop over alist and blist to submit the futures ?
    – zython
    Apr 6, 2018 at 10:37
  • @zython Yes, but not in the typical nested fashion. To emulate ThreadPoolExecutor.map, you want to use zip to combine the two lists, which will allow you to iterate over the tuples. Please see my answer for clarification. Oct 8, 2022 at 0:39
  • Also this example doesn't compile. Oct 8, 2022 at 0:50
1

I had some trouble getting the other options to work the way i liked and stumbled across this, which worked well for me. https://pythonhosted.org/futures/#processpoolexecutor-example

import math
from concurrent import futures

PRIMES = [
    112272535095293,
    112582705942171,
    112272535095293,
    115280095190773,
    115797848077099,
    1099726899285419]

def is_prime(n):
    if n % 2 == 0:
        return False

    sqrt_n = int(math.floor(math.sqrt(n)))
    for i in range(3, sqrt_n + 1, 2):
        if n % i == 0:
            return False
    return True

def main():
    with futures.ProcessPoolExecutor() as executor:
        for number, prime in zip(PRIMES, executor.map(is_prime, PRIMES)):
            print('%d is prime: %s' % (number, prime))

if __name__ == '__main__':
    main()
4
  • 1
    Incomplete answers that do not show full scope are insuffcient. Where is number, prime and PRIMES defined at? Feb 18, 2022 at 9:16
  • Also a definition of is_prime would be nice - although it can be inferred - as it stands I find this example a bit confusing because of its lack of context. Oct 8, 2022 at 0:43
  • @jrich523 Thanks for updating your answer! Upvoted. It works great, just needs from concurrent import futures. Oct 11, 2022 at 1:27
  • thanks @knightofiam, it was a copy paste from the link sorta funny they didnt include that, good catch!
    – jrich523
    Oct 11, 2022 at 16:36
-1

The map method returns an iterator yielding the results from the calls to func.

1
  • Yes this is true and insightful; I also think this would work better as a comment rather than an answer. Oct 8, 2022 at 0:41

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