50

I am reading an enum value from a binary file and would like to check if the value is really part of the enum values. How can I do it?

#include <iostream>

enum Abc
{
    A = 4,
    B = 8,
    C = 12
};

int main()
{
    int v1 = 4;
    Abc v2 = static_cast< Abc >( v1 );

    switch ( v2 )
    {
        case A:
            std::cout<<"A"<<std::endl;
            break;
        case B:
            std::cout<<"B"<<std::endl;
            break;
        case C:
            std::cout<<"C"<<std::endl;
            break;
        default :
            std::cout<<"no match found"<<std::endl;
    }
}

Do I have to use the switch operator or is there a better way?

EDIT

I have enum values set and unfortunately I can not modify them. To make things worse, they are not continuous (their values goes 0, 75,76,80,85,90,95,100, etc.)

  • 3
    Any enum is just a number, so I don't think there's better way to check it. You probably should define a more rigid structure for your datatypes. – Rizo Feb 11 '11 at 12:58
27

enum value is valid in C++ if it falls in range [A, B], which is defined by the standard rule below. So in case of enum X { A = 1, B = 3 }, the value of 2 is considered a valid enum value.

Consider 7.2/6 of standard:

For an enumeration where emin is the smallest enumerator and emax is the largest, the values of the enumeration are the values of the underlying type in the range bmin to bmax, where bmin and bmax are, respectively, the smallest and largest values of the smallest bit-field that can store emin and emax. It is possible to define an enumeration that has values not defined by any of its enumerators.

There is no retrospection in C++. One approach to take is to list enum values in an array additionally and write a wrapper that would do conversion and possibly throw an exception on failure.

See Similar Question about how to cast int to enum for further details.

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  • 3
    you misinterpreted the standard quote, there is more than [A,B] in the valid values. – Matthieu M. Feb 11 '11 at 13:25
  • 14
    Indeed, e.g if the values are 1 and 5, then the latter requires at least 3 bits, so 6 and 7 will also be valid values of the enumerator. – visitor Feb 11 '11 at 13:34
  • 6
    This answer is still incorrect. @visitor pointed out an example that your example fails with. He says "if the values are 1 and 5, then the latter requires at least 3 bits, so 6 and 7 will also be valid values of the enumerator". Your answer implies that only {1, 2, 3, 4, 5} will be valid values, in this case. Your quotation of the standard is correct, but your example is misleading. – mannyglover Nov 12 '18 at 20:58
14

Maybe use enum like this:

enum MyEnum
{
A,
B,
C
};

and to check

if (v2 >= A && v2 <= C)

If you don't specify values for enum constants, the values start at zero and increase by one with each move down the list. For example, given enum MyEnumType { ALPHA, BETA, GAMMA }; ALPHA has a value of 0, BETA has a value of 1, and GAMMA has a value of 2.

| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    I like the simplicity of this and expanded it by always defining the first item in an enum as SOMETYPE_UNKNOWN and the last one as SOMETYPE_MAX. Then the test will always be AssertTrue(v2 >= SOMETYPE_UNKNOWN && v2 <= SOMETYPE_MAX). Of course, only ever add items after UNKNOWN and before MAX. – Elise van Looij Mar 30 '16 at 16:37
  • I didn't understand your idea at first, but it is indeed an excellent, zero maintenance trick! – pfabri Jan 19 '17 at 21:32
12

In C++ 11 there is a better way if you are prepared to list your enum values as template parameters. You can look at this as a good thing, allowing you to accept subsets of the valid enum values in different contexts; often useful when parsing codes from external sources.

A possible useful addition to the example below would be some static assertions around the underlying type of EnumType relative to IntType to avoid truncation issues. Left as an exercise.

#include <stdio.h>

template<typename EnumType, EnumType... Values> class EnumCheck;

template<typename EnumType> class EnumCheck<EnumType>
{
public:
    template<typename IntType>
    static bool constexpr is_value(IntType) { return false; }
};

template<typename EnumType, EnumType V, EnumType... Next>
class EnumCheck<EnumType, V, Next...> : private EnumCheck<EnumType, Next...>
{
    using super = EnumCheck<EnumType, Next...>;

public:
    template<typename IntType>
    static bool constexpr is_value(IntType v)
    {
        return v == static_cast<IntType>(V) || super::is_value(v);
    }
};

enum class Test {
    A = 1,
    C = 3,
    E = 5
};

using TestCheck = EnumCheck<Test, Test::A, Test::C, Test::E>;

void check_value(int v)
{
    if (TestCheck::is_value(v))
        printf("%d is OK\n", v);
    else
        printf("%d is not OK\n", v);
}

int main()
{
    for (int i = 0; i < 10; ++i)
        check_value(i);
}
| improve this answer | |
  • Since value of 'int v' is not known at compile time, is_value will have to be executed at run time. Wouldn't this result in all kinds of recursive function calls and be very inefficient compared to a simple switch statement or an array of all values? You still have to list all enum values, so it's not like you are gaining anything with this approach. Or did I miss something here? – Innocent Bystander Sep 18 '17 at 1:12
  • @InnocentBystander They're all constexpr functions, so the compiler has lots of scope for optimisation. The functions also aren't recursive; it's a chain of functions that happens to have the same name. In some quick tests with the example above, gcc 5.4 generates code one instruction shorter for the template version vs. the switch version. Clang 3.8 is two instructions longer for the template version. The result will vary depending on how many values and whether the values are contiguous. The big win, especially when doing protocol decoding, is you write the codes you expect on one line. – janm Sep 18 '17 at 10:04
  • 1
    you're right -- sorry not "recursive" per se, but chain of function calls. That's interesting that the compilers can optimize all that away. And thank you for following up on a 3 year old answer :) – Innocent Bystander Sep 18 '17 at 13:54
7

The only way I ever found to make it 'easy', was to create (macro) a sorted array of the enums and checking with that.

The switch trick fail with enums because an enum may have more than one enumerator with a given value.

It's an annoying issue, really.

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5

Managed Extensions for C++ supports the following syntax:

enum Abc
{
    A = 4,
    B = 8,
    C = 12
};

Enum::IsDefined(Abc::typeid, 8);

Reference: MSDN "Managed Extensions for C++ Programming"

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  • I am not sure what "managed c++" is, but are you sure it is c++, and not c#? this looks like c# – BЈовић Aug 18 '14 at 7:04
  • 3
    @BЈовић: managed c++ is a Microsoft variant of c++ which is able to use the libraries of the .NET framework. It looks like this is c++ since the :: operator is not defined in c# like this. – Stefan Aug 18 '14 at 7:11
  • @BЈовић did you try the code in a Managed Extensions C++ project? We are using similar code in one of our C++ projects. Specifically we use the Enum::IsDefined() method. – Brett Feb 3 '15 at 23:50
  • @Brett sorry I have no idea what "managed extension c++ project is" – BЈовић Feb 10 '15 at 7:59
  • @BЈовић I added a reference to MSDN "Managed Extensions for C++ Programming" in the answer. Hope that helps. – Brett May 3 '15 at 10:24
4

Kinda necro, but ... makes a RANGE check of int into first/last enum values (can be combined with janm's idea to make exact checks), C++11:

Header:

namespace chkenum
{
    template <class T, T begin, T end>
    struct RangeCheck
    {
    private:
        typedef typename std::underlying_type<T>::type val_t;
    public:
        static
        typename std::enable_if<std::is_enum<T>::value, bool>::type
        inrange(val_t value)
        {
            return value >= static_cast<val_t>(begin) && value <= static_cast<val_t>(end);
        }
    };

    template<class T>
    struct EnumCheck;
}

#define DECLARE_ENUM_CHECK(T,B,E) namespace chkenum {template<> struct EnumCheck<T> : public RangeCheck<T, B, E> {};}

template<class T>
inline
typename std::enable_if<std::is_enum<T>::value, bool>::type
testEnumRange(int val)
{
    return chkenum::EnumCheck<T>::inrange(val);
}

Enum declaration:

enum MinMaxType
{
     Max = 0x800, Min, Equal
};
DECLARE_ENUM_CHECK(MinMaxType, MinMaxType::Max, MinMaxType::Equal);

Usage:

bool r = testEnumRange<MinMaxType>(i);

Mainly difference of above proposed it that test function is dependent on enum type itself only.

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2

Speaking about a language, there is no better way, the enum values exist compile time only and there is no way to enumerate them programatically. With a well thought infrastructure you may still be able to avoid listing all values several times, though. See Easy way to use variables of enum types as string in C?

Your sample can then be rewritten using the "enumFactory.h" provided there as:

#include "enumFactory.h"

#define ABC_ENUM(XX) \
    XX(A,=4) \
    XX(B,=8) \
    XX(C,=12) \

DECLARE_ENUM(Abc,ABC_ENUM)

int main()
{
    int v1 = 4;
    Abc v2 = static_cast< Abc >( v1 );

    #define CHECK_ENUM_CASE(name,assign) case name: std::cout<< #name <<std::endl; break;
    switch ( v2 )
    {
        ABC_ENUM(CHECK_ENUM_CASE)
        default :
            std::cout<<"no match found"<<std::endl;
    }
    #undef CHECK_ENUM_CASE
}

or even (using some more facilities already existing in that header):

#include "enumFactory.h"

#define ABC_ENUM(XX) \
    XX(A,=4) \
    XX(B,=8) \
    XX(C,=12) \

DECLARE_ENUM(Abc,ABC_ENUM)
DEFINE_ENUM(Abc,ABC_ENUM)

int main()
{
    int v1 = 4;
    Abc v2 = static_cast< Abc >( v1 );
    const char *name = GetString(v2);
    if (name[0]==0) name = "no match found";
    std::cout << name << std::endl;
}
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0

Yet another way to do it:

#include <algorithm>
#include <iterator>
#include <iostream>

template<typename>
struct enum_traits { static constexpr void* values = nullptr; };

namespace detail
{

template<typename T>
constexpr bool is_value_of(int, void*) { return false; }

template<typename T, typename U>
constexpr bool is_value_of(int v, U)
{
    using std::begin; using std::end;

    return std::find_if(begin(enum_traits<T>::values), end(enum_traits<T>::values),
        [=](auto value){ return value == static_cast<T>(v); }
    ) != end(enum_traits<T>::values);
}

}

template<typename T>
constexpr bool is_value_of(int v)
{ return detail::is_value_of<T>(v, decltype(enum_traits<T>::values) { }); }

////////////////////
enum Abc { A = 4, B = 8, C = 12 };

template<>
struct enum_traits<Abc> { static constexpr auto values = { A, B, C }; };
decltype(enum_traits<Abc>::values) enum_traits<Abc>::values;

enum class Def { D = 1, E = 3, F = 5 };

int main()
{
    std::cout << "Abc:";
    for(int i = 0; i < 10; ++i)
        if(is_value_of<Abc>(i)) std::cout << " " << i;
    std::cout << std::endl;

    std::cout << "Def:";
    for(int i = 0; i < 10; ++i)
        if(is_value_of<Def>(i)) std::cout << " " << i;
    std::cout << std::endl;

    return 0;
}

The "ugly" part of this approach IMHO is having to define:

decltype(enum_traits<Abc>::values) enum_traits<Abc>::values

If you are not opposed to macros, you can wrap it inside a macro:

#define REGISTER_ENUM_VALUES(name, ...) \
template<> struct enum_traits<name> { static constexpr auto values = { __VA_ARGS__ }; }; \
decltype(enum_traits<name>::values) enum_traits<name>::values;
| improve this answer | |

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