11

When I commit my transaction, i'm getting:

System.Threading.SemaphoreFullException: Adding the specified count to the semaphore would cause it to exceed its maximum count.
   at System.Threading.Semaphore.Release(Int32 releaseCount)
   at System.Data.ProviderBase.DbConnectionPool.PutNewObject(DbConnectionInternal obj)
   at System.Data.ProviderBase.DbConnectionPool.DeactivateObject(DbConnectionInternal obj)
   at System.Data.ProviderBase.DbConnectionPool.PutObject(DbConnectionInternal obj, Object owningObject)
   at System.Data.ProviderBase.DbConnectionInternal.CloseConnection(DbConnection owningObject, DbConnectionFactory connectionFactory)
   at System.Data.SqlClient.SqlConnection.Close()
   at System.Data.SqlClient.SqlConnection.Dispose(Boolean disposing)
   at System.ComponentModel.Component.Dispose()
   // rest of my stack trace here

What does this mean? Am I not closing a connection properly somewhere and have filled the pool up? If so, how do I check this in SQL Server 2008 R2?

here's my code (although this may not be the code guilty of causing the connection leak)

using (var connection = connectionFactory.GetConnection())
{
    connection.Open();

    using (var transaction = connection.BeginTransaction())
    {
        try
        {
            using (var command = connection.CreateCommand())
            {
                command.Connection = connection;
                command.Transaction = transaction;
                command.CommandText = "some sql"

                data = (string) command.ExecuteScalar();

                transaction.Commit();
            }
        }
        catch
        {
            try
            {
                transaction.Rollback();
            }
            catch
            {
            }
            throw;
        }
    }
}

return data;
4
  • I believe this is a bug in the pooling. Try disabling connection pooling and see if it fixes the problem. What version of the framework are you using?
    – Pete
    Jun 3 '11 at 17:23
  • The problem is of course real and relevant to look at, but I'm just curious on why you're using a manual transaction instead of TransactionScope? Jun 9 '11 at 19:35
  • @Anders no reason, probably should be... Sep 12 '11 at 11:29
  • Did specifying the connection resolve this issue? Is there something else you've done to resolve it (I ask because I'm hitting the same issue and there's no accepted answer)? May 12 '14 at 13:22
2

As Pete mentioned, this might be a bug in connection pooling. In any case, I noticed your code is missing a call that MS says is required. From MSDN

   // Must assign both transaction object and connection
   // to Command object for a pending local transaction
   command.Connection = connection;
   command.Transaction = transaction;

Give that a try and see if it still happens.

0

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