37

In the following example, why should we favour using f1 over f2? Is it more efficient in some sense? For someone used to base R, it seems more natural to use the "substitute + eval" option.

library(dplyr)

d = data.frame(x = 1:5,
               y = rnorm(5))

# using enquo + !!
f1 = function(mydata, myvar) {
  m = enquo(myvar)
  mydata %>%
    mutate(two_y = 2 * !!m)
}

# using substitute + eval    
f2 = function(mydata, myvar) {
  m = substitute(myvar)
  mydata %>%
    mutate(two_y = 2 * eval(m))
}

all.equal(d %>% f1(y), d %>% f2(y)) # TRUE

In other words, and beyond this particular example, my question is: can I get get away with programming using dplyr NSE functions with good ol' base R like substitute+eval, or do I really need to learn to love all those rlang functions because there is a benefit to it (speed, clarity, compositionality,...)?

13
  • 15
    I think the world would be a better place if the dplyr:: ppl would just allow us to pass variable names as character strings, as in the old underscored variants like mutate_(). imo, an even better option would be to have an argument like colnames_as_strings=TRUE for mutate() et al... that would make it straightforward to use dplyr both interactively and in software. But until then, welcome to enquo()/!! hell...
    – lefft
    Apr 6, 2018 at 21:39
  • 4
    @lefft I’ve been told that passing column names as characters is “dangerous and unreliable”, but I’ve never gotten a convincing explanation for why that is except in cases that seem bizarrely rare to me. I suppose if you encounter those edge cases routinely it makes more sense, it’s just weird to me bc I don’t think I ever have.
    – joran
    Apr 6, 2018 at 22:29
  • 2
    @KonradRudolph i'm suggesting to allow character-based selection/subsetting in a language whose definition uses that convention...
    – lefft
    Apr 6, 2018 at 22:50
  • 6
    @KonradRudolph The only thing I feel knowledgeable enough to comment on at this point is that your case maybe isn’t helped by that first sentence.
    – joran
    Apr 6, 2018 at 22:58
  • 3
    @KonradRudolph fwiw I believe you (if for no other reason than I know you know a lot more about this than me). I was merely trying to nudge the tone in a different direction.
    – joran
    Apr 7, 2018 at 20:17

4 Answers 4

22

I want to give an answer that is independent of dplyr, because there is a very clear advantage to using enquo over substitute. Both look in the calling environment of a function to identify the expression that was given to that function. The difference is that substitute() does it only once, while !!enquo() will correctly walk up the entire calling stack.

Consider a simple function that uses substitute():

f <- function( myExpr ) {
  eval( substitute(myExpr), list(a=2, b=3) )
}

f(a+b)   # 5
f(a*b)   # 6

This functionality breaks when the call is nested inside another function:

g <- function( myExpr ) {
  val <- f( substitute(myExpr) )
  ## Do some stuff
  val
}

g(a+b)
# myExpr     <-- OOPS

Now consider the same functions re-written using enquo():

library( rlang )

f2 <- function( myExpr ) {
  eval_tidy( enquo(myExpr), list(a=2, b=3) )
}

g2 <- function( myExpr ) {
  val <- f2( !!enquo(myExpr) )
  val
}

g2( a+b )    # 5
g2( b/a )    # 1.5

And that is why enquo() + !! is preferable to substitute() + eval(). dplyr simply takes full advantage of this property to build a coherent set of NSE functions.

UPDATE: rlang 0.4.0 introduced a new operator {{ (pronounced "curly curly"), which is effectively a short hand for !!enquo(). This allows us to simplify the definition of g2 to

g2 <- function( myExpr ) {
  val <- f2( {{myExpr}} )
  val
}
1
  • 2
    Great answer man, this was what I was looking for. Many thanks.
    – mbiron
    Nov 9, 2018 at 23:11
6

enquo() and !! also allows you to program with other dplyr verbs such as group_by and select. I'm not sure if substitute and eval can do that. Take a look at this example where I modify your data frame a little bit

library(dplyr)

set.seed(1234)
d = data.frame(x = c(1, 1, 2, 2, 3),
               y = rnorm(5),
               z = runif(5))

# select, group_by & create a new output name based on input supplied
my_summarise <- function(df, group_var, select_var) {

  group_var <- enquo(group_var)
  select_var <- enquo(select_var)

  # create new name
  mean_name <- paste0("mean_", quo_name(select_var))

  df %>%
    select(!!select_var, !!group_var) %>% 
    group_by(!!group_var) %>%
    summarise(!!mean_name := mean(!!select_var))
}

my_summarise(d, x, z)

# A tibble: 3 x 2
      x mean_z
  <dbl>  <dbl>
1    1.  0.619
2    2.  0.603
3    3.  0.292

Edit: also enquos & !!! make it easier to capture list of variables

# example
grouping_vars <- quos(x, y)
d %>%
  group_by(!!!grouping_vars) %>%
  summarise(mean_z = mean(z))

# A tibble: 5 x 3
# Groups:   x [?]
      x      y mean_z
  <dbl>  <dbl>  <dbl>
1    1. -1.21   0.694
2    1.  0.277  0.545
3    2. -2.35   0.923
4    2.  1.08   0.283
5    3.  0.429  0.292


# in a function
my_summarise2 <- function(df, select_var, ...) {

  group_var <- enquos(...)
  select_var <- enquo(select_var)

  # create new name
  mean_name <- paste0("mean_", quo_name(select_var))

  df %>%
    select(!!select_var, !!!group_var) %>% 
    group_by(!!!group_var) %>%
    summarise(!!mean_name := mean(!!select_var))
}

my_summarise2(d, z, x, y)

# A tibble: 5 x 3
# Groups:   x [?]
      x      y mean_z
  <dbl>  <dbl>  <dbl>
1    1. -1.21   0.694
2    1.  0.277  0.545
3    2. -2.35   0.923
4    2.  1.08   0.283
5    3.  0.429  0.292

Credit: Programming with dplyr

3
  • 1
    Thanks! It would be nice to see if substitute+eval could work in those cases too though. In the end, my question was basically: can I get get away with programming using dplyr NSE functions with good ol' substitute+eval, or do I really need to learn to love all those rlang functions you mentioned because there is a benefit to it?
    – mbiron
    Apr 7, 2018 at 0:57
  • 1
    @mbiron: I'm curious to see a solution using substitute+eval too. IMO if you're using a lot of tidyverse packages then it's worth to learn about tidyeval as Hadley and other devs are pushing toward that direction. Here is an example parsing input strings into dplyr. Another example using tidyeval in ggplot2
    – Tung
    Apr 7, 2018 at 3:03
  • 2
    @mbiron Of course you can theoretically use eval and substitute here. But the solutions would be painfully complex and complicated. {rlang}’s contribution is to generalise, formalise and simplify the solution by building on existing computer science research. Apr 7, 2018 at 20:10
5

Imagine there is a different x you want to multiply:

> x <- 3
> f1(d, !!x)
  x            y two_y
1 1 -2.488894875     6
2 2 -1.133517746     6
3 3 -1.024834108     6
4 4  0.730537366     6
5 5 -1.325431756     6

vs without the !!:

> f1(d, x)
  x            y two_y
1 1 -2.488894875     2
2 2 -1.133517746     4
3 3 -1.024834108     6
4 4  0.730537366     8
5 5 -1.325431756    10

!! gives you more control over scoping than substitute - with substitute you can only get the 2nd way easily.

1
  • I see. It seems related to something that shows up in this blog post: !! deals better with composition of functions that use NSE. Still, the examples seem a bit awkward
    – mbiron
    Apr 6, 2018 at 22:46
4

To add some nuance, these things are not necessarily that complex in base R.

It is important to remember to use eval.parent() when relevant to evaluate substituted arguments in the right environment, if you use eval.parent() properly the expression in nested calls will find their ways. If you don't you might discover environment hell :).

The base tool box that I use is made of quote(), substitute(), bquote(), as.call(), and do.call() (the latter useful when used with substitute()

Without going into details here is how to solve in base R the cases presented by @Artem and @Tung, without any tidy evaluation, and then the last example, not using quo / enquo, but still benefiting from splicing and unquoting (!!! and !!)

We'll see that splicing and unquoting makes code nicer (but requires functions to support it!), and that in the present cases using quosures doesn't improve things dramatically (but still arguably does).

solving Artem's case with base R

f0 <- function( myExpr ) {
  eval(substitute(myExpr), list(a=2, b=3))
}

g0 <- function( myExpr ) {
  val <- eval.parent(substitute(f0(myExpr)))
  val
}

f0(a+b)
#> [1] 5
g0(a+b)
#> [1] 5

solving Tung's 1st case with base R

my_summarise0 <- function(df, group_var, select_var) {

  group_var  <- substitute(group_var)
  select_var <- substitute(select_var)

  # create new name
  mean_name <- paste0("mean_", as.character(select_var))

  eval.parent(substitute(
  df %>%
    select(select_var, group_var) %>% 
    group_by(group_var) %>%
    summarise(mean_name := mean(select_var))))
}

library(dplyr)
set.seed(1234)
d = data.frame(x = c(1, 1, 2, 2, 3),
               y = rnorm(5),
               z = runif(5))
my_summarise0(d, x, z)
#> # A tibble: 3 x 2
#>       x mean_z
#>   <dbl>  <dbl>
#> 1     1  0.619
#> 2     2  0.603
#> 3     3  0.292

solving Tung's 2nd case with base R

grouping_vars <- c(quote(x), quote(y))
eval(as.call(c(quote(group_by), quote(d), grouping_vars))) %>%
  summarise(mean_z = mean(z))
#> # A tibble: 5 x 3
#> # Groups:   x [3]
#>       x      y mean_z
#>   <dbl>  <dbl>  <dbl>
#> 1     1 -1.21   0.694
#> 2     1  0.277  0.545
#> 3     2 -2.35   0.923
#> 4     2  1.08   0.283
#> 5     3  0.429  0.292

in a function:

my_summarise02 <- function(df, select_var, ...) {

  group_var  <- eval(substitute(alist(...)))
  select_var <- substitute(select_var)

  # create new name
  mean_name <- paste0("mean_", as.character(select_var))

  df %>%
    {eval(as.call(c(quote(select),quote(.), select_var, group_var)))} %>% 
    {eval(as.call(c(quote(group_by),quote(.), group_var)))} %>%
    {eval(bquote(summarise(.,.(mean_name) := mean(.(select_var)))))}
}

my_summarise02(d, z, x, y)
#> # A tibble: 5 x 3
#> # Groups:   x [3]
#>       x      y mean_z
#>   <dbl>  <dbl>  <dbl>
#> 1     1 -1.21   0.694
#> 2     1  0.277  0.545
#> 3     2 -2.35   0.923
#> 4     2  1.08   0.283
#> 5     3  0.429  0.292

solving Tung's 2nd case with base R but using !! and !!!

grouping_vars <- c(quote(x), quote(y))

d %>%
  group_by(!!!grouping_vars) %>%
  summarise(mean_z = mean(z))
#> # A tibble: 5 x 3
#> # Groups:   x [3]
#>       x      y mean_z
#>   <dbl>  <dbl>  <dbl>
#> 1     1 -1.21   0.694
#> 2     1  0.277  0.545
#> 3     2 -2.35   0.923
#> 4     2  1.08   0.283
#> 5     3  0.429  0.292

in a function :

my_summarise03 <- function(df, select_var, ...) {

  group_var  <- eval(substitute(alist(...)))
  select_var <- substitute(select_var)

  # create new name
  mean_name <- paste0("mean_", as.character(select_var))

  df %>%
    select(!!select_var, !!!group_var) %>% 
    group_by(!!!group_var) %>%
    summarise(.,!!mean_name := mean(!!select_var))
}

my_summarise03(d, z, x, y)
#> # A tibble: 5 x 3
#> # Groups:   x [3]
#>       x      y mean_z
#>   <dbl>  <dbl>  <dbl>
#> 1     1 -1.21   0.694
#> 2     1  0.277  0.545
#> 3     2 -2.35   0.923
#> 4     2  1.08   0.283
#> 5     3  0.429  0.292

2
  • Of course we could also use the *_at() variants, but it's besides the point here Oct 4, 2019 at 16:19
  • 1
    Very clever use of eval.parent()! Oct 4, 2019 at 16:44

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