1

I look for the total amount of future dates in my array, some keys do not have value.

I have already managed to separate the dates in a new array to obtain only future ones:

let dates = resp.consultas.map(consultas => consultas.date_a);

result:

[
  "2018-04-02T15:15",
  "2018-04-07T14:20",
  "2018-04-28T11:50",
  null,
  null,
  null,
  null,
  "2018-05-30T17:45",
  "2018-04-07T16:20"
]

How do I get the count of just future dates?

2
  • You're missing something here. Do you need reference to the original object or no? Apr 6 '18 at 23:19
  • Also I noticed these are timestamps without timezone. Do you need them as local or are they stored as UTC and not correctly denoted on return? Apr 6 '18 at 23:20
3
// Get current time
const now = Date.now();
const futureDates = dates.filter(date => {
  // Filter out dates in the past or falsey values
  return date && (new Date(date)).getTime() > now;
});

// Do something with the result
console.log(futureDates.length);
1

You can use moment.isAfter and Array.filter to clean the old dates and the null values.

const dates = [
  "2018-04-02T15:15",
  "2018-04-07T14:20",
  "2018-04-28T11:50",
  null,
  null,
  null,
  null,
  "2018-05-30T17:45",
  "2018-04-07T16:20"
]

const futureDates = dates.filter(date => moment(date).isAfter())

console.log(futureDates);
<script src="https://momentjs.com/downloads/moment.js"></script>

How do I get the count of just future dates?

After using filter, only the valid dates remain, so:

console.log(futureDates.length);
4
  • Sure, Moment is nice if you're doing a lot of work with time. That said, for this the Date API is pretty sufficient.
    – IliasT
    Apr 6 '18 at 23:39
  • 1
    Yeah, I know, but since there were at least 2 other answers using Date I wanted to provide an alternative. And moment it's the best JS date library imho, so the OP will probably learn another thing :) Apr 6 '18 at 23:42
  • Do not mention that I'm using Angular, it seemed a minor fact. I already have built-in angular-moment in my app. Therefore adding back to the library would not be the best. thanks for your answer!
    – nicogaldo
    Apr 7 '18 at 1:24
  • You can access moment, if you're already using angular-moment, you don't need to add the library. If you wish to use moment() in your services, controllers, or directives, simply inject the moment variable into the constructor. Apr 7 '18 at 1:35
0

Use Array.filter like below if don't consider the situations like time zone, invalid date string etc:

const test = [
  "2018-04-02T15:15",
  "2018-04-07T14:20",
  "2018-04-28T11:50",
  null,
  null,
  null,
  null,
  "2018-05-30T17:45",
  "2018-04-07T16:20"
]
const currentWhenCalc = new Date()
result = test.filter(function(item){
  return item && new Date(item) > currentWhenCalc
})
console.log('data', result, 'count', result.length)

3
  • I'd be careful with this code given there is both no check for null values and the time of today (aka "now) is precomputed. When passing null to new Date it will give you the current time. That means you could end up with null values in your final result given a slight delay between when the value today is calculated and when a null value is compared to it.
    – IliasT
    Apr 6 '18 at 23:29
  • Thanks for updating your code in response to my comment :)
    – IliasT
    Apr 6 '18 at 23:34
  • 1
    When you pass null to Date you get epoch 0 in Chrome/Node/FF Apr 6 '18 at 23:42
0

Actually you don't even need to de nest them. If you want to filter an array you should use Array.filter. IT has the footprint of (value, index, originalArray) => Boolean with a true meaning keep, and a false meaning remove:

let currentTime = new Date();
let futureconsultas = resp.consultas.filter( consultas =>
  new Date(consultas.date_a) - currentTime > 0
);

Now you should have an array of all future dates
- As a note: new Date() - new Date('INVALID') returns NaN which evaluates to false when compared to a number or when masked, so you don't have to worry about bad dates. A new Date(null) argument results in epoch 0, which is NOT before now, and new Date(undefined) results in an bad date
- A second note: You shouldn't use a new Date() call in each loop. This can slow down execution if the array is large enough. Get a reference Date and use the Closure(scope) to reference it.

This works because when you math two Dates, they result is actually a number based on the epoch values of the date.

A simplified example:

const filtration = object => object.v > 3
console.log([{v:1},{v:2},{v:3},{v:4},{v:5}].filter(filtration)) // [{v:4},{v:5}]

After that you can just check the .length property on the Array

[1,2,3,4,5].length == 5 // true

Array has several helpful functions on the prototype in JS including forEach(mutating), filter, map, find, findIndex, and more

2
  • Your code worked, but typescript marks an error when deploying the application (Angular). The left-hand side of an arithmetic operation must be of type 'any', 'number' or an enum type. For that reason mark as correct another answer that also worked. Thank you!
    – nicogaldo
    Apr 7 '18 at 1:55
  • Odd. It should always be a number for comparisons due to coercion Apr 7 '18 at 1:56
0

Dates are the array in your example dates (as strings). Array has a filter method which executes a provided function for each date in your dates array. Then you check if that date has actually a value (not null), create new date to represent today date (dt) and date from the string in your array. Date.getTime() is a method that compares 'time ticks' and is a good way to compare two date objects. If your date is greater (in future) then today, that date is added into new array that filter function build based on this condition (futureDates) which, in the end, will contain only elements that are in future.

var futureDates = dates.filter(function(date) {
   if(date) {
     var dt = new Date();
     var df = new Date(date);
     if(df.getTime() > dt.getTime())
       return df;
     }
});
3
  • just return df.getTime() > dt.getTime(), dont need to wrap with if else
    – Sphinx
    Apr 6 '18 at 23:40
  • yes, this was brief on the fly, I was going for clarity rather then concise answer. Apr 6 '18 at 23:47
  • Can you provide an explanation along with your code?
    – jhpratt
    Apr 7 '18 at 0:15

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