This question already has an answer here:

I'm studying how to use generator in JavaScript.

Since generator returns iterator, I thought I could use it like iterable.filter() like array.prototype.filter.

But, iterable object does not have filter, map, forEach, reduce method.

So, I made a generator version of filter, map, reduce, forEach method like the below.

My current code

'use strict';

function* range(n) {
    for (let i = 1; i <= n; i++) {
        yield i;
    }
}

function* filter(context, predicate) {

    for (let i of context) {
        if (predicate(i) === true) {
            yield i;
        }
    }

}

function isEven(value) {
    return value % 2 === 0;
}

console.log(
    ...filter(range(10), isEven)
);

This code does work, but rather than filter(range(10), isEven), I want to use it like range(10).filter(isEven).

Is there any way to accomplish what I want?

I was looking into ES6 Proxy, Reflect, but hmm... I'm not sure if these ES6 things help me.

How I want to use

range(10)
    .filter(isEven) //generator version of filter
    .map(multiplyBy5) //generator version of map
    .forEach(console.log); //generator version of forEach

Another Try - Nah... hahaha...

This code works as well, but this is like a joke...

'use strict';

function* filter(predicate) {
    for (let i of this) {
        if(predicate(i) === true) {
            yield i;
        }
    }   
}


function* map(project) {
    for (let i of this) {
        yield project(i);
    }   
}

function* range(end) {
    for (let i = 0; i <= end; i++) {
        yield i;        
    }
}

const isEven = (v) => v % 2 === 0;
const multiplyBy = (v) => (by) => v * by;

var range10_filterByEven = filter.bind(range(10), isEven);
var range10_filterByEven_multiplyBy10 = map.bind(range10_filterByEven(), multiplyBy(10));

console.log(
    ...range10_filterByEven_multiplyBy10() //0 20 40 60 80 100
);

Looks better although this is not how I want it to be.

'use strict';

function filter(predicate) {
    return function* f() {
        for (let i of this) {
                if(predicate(i) === true) {
                    yield i;
                }
            }
    }   
}


function map(project) {
    return function* m() {
        for (let i of this) {
            yield project(i);
        }  
    }
}

function range(end) {
    return function* r() {
        for (let i = 0; i <= end; i++) {
            yield i;        
        }
    }
}

const isEven = (v) => v % 2 === 0;
const multiplyBy = (v) => (by) => v * by;


function pipe() {
    return [...arguments].reduce(function(chain, current) {
        return current.bind(chain()); 
    })}

console.log(
    ...pipe(
        range(10),
        filter(isEven),
        map(multiplyBy(10))
    )()
);

marked as duplicate by Bergi javascript Apr 7 at 13:52

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • 2
    The way you want to use it is fundamentally different from how a generator function is used. You could write range such that it wasn't a generator (but used one internally) and returned an object with filter on it, but then, there are lots of other things you can do, too, if we don't start with range being a generator, so... – T.J. Crowder Apr 7 at 9:50
  • @T.J.Crowder Thank you for your feedback! let me try something else... – shu Apr 7 at 9:56
up vote 1 down vote accepted

You could possibly just extend the generator prototype, although this looks hacky and I am not sure I would recommend this approach.

On the other hand, I believe this is the simplest approach to what you expected.

function* range(n) {
    for (let i = 1; i <= n; i++) {
        yield i;
    }
}

// "Generator" is not resolvable at the top level
var Generator = Object.getPrototypeOf(function* () {});

Generator.prototype.filter = function*(predicate) {
    for (let i of this) {
        if (predicate(i) === true) {
            yield i;
        }
    }        
}

for ( var elem of range(10).filter( x => x<5) ) {
    console.log(elem);
}

for ( var elem of range(10).filter( x => x<5 ).filter( x => x<3 ) ) {
    console.log(elem);
}

Other operators could possibly be added in a similar way.

  • This looks pretty good!! It gives me many hints as well! Thank you! – shu Apr 7 at 13:33
  • Thanks, please accept this as an answer if you believe this suits you. – Wiktor Zychla Apr 7 at 13:46

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