33

As the title says, How do you use reflection to check if a class definition is defined as internal?

typeof(...) returns certain properties shown below but not whether a class is defined as internal. Looked on Google but all I could find were lots of articles about running internal or protected methods using reflection.

It's not the methods I'm interested in this case, but the class definition.

var type = typeof(Customer);
Assert.IsTrue(type.IsClass);
Assert.That(type.IsAbstract, Is.EqualTo(isAbstract));
Assert.That(type.IsPublic, Is.EqualTo(isPublic));
Assert.That(type.IsPublic, Is.EqualTo(isPublic));
Assert.That(type.IsSealed, Is.EqualTo(isSealed));
Assert.That(type.IsSerializable, Is.EqualTo(isSerializable));

4 Answers 4

39

This is a classic issue. From MSDN:

The C# keywords protected and internal have no meaning in IL and are not used in the Reflection APIs. The corresponding terms in IL are Family and Assembly. To identify an internal method using Reflection, use the IsAssembly property. To identify a protected internal method, use the IsFamilyOrAssembly.

Reflection does not expose a way on Type check if it is internal, protected or protected internal.

6
  • I'm not sure the MSDN documentation is accurate, but perhaps I'm wrong. For example, I know Tuple<> implements internal interface ITuple. The Type on this interface has false for the aforementioned flags. Tests on my own internal class behave the same. Feb 11, 2011 at 16:16
  • Further, Nested to me reads as class A { class B { } }, where B is nested within A. The properties the documentation specifically mentions, IsAssembly, IsFamily are not publicly available on the Type object. Feb 11, 2011 at 16:21
  • One minor correction: C# protected internal corresponds to CLR FamORAssem (i.e. visible to anything that is in the same assembly OR a derived type). FamANDAssem has no corresponding C# equivalent (except in my dreams).
    – zinglon
    Feb 11, 2011 at 16:25
  • 3
    Primarily thanks to @Jason for the quick and detailed answer. Thanks to everyone else for the further detail. Stack Overflow really is the dogs when it comes to getting answers! Feb 11, 2011 at 16:40
  • 3
    @AnthonyPegram For a non-nested type, i.e. a type that is a direct member of a namespace and not contained in an outer class/struct, there are two levels possible. In reflection they correspond to IsPublic and IsNotPublic properties. These properties return false for all nested types. For nested types, use properties like IsNestedFamOrAssem, IsNestedPrivate and so on (all begin with IsNested...). Feb 17, 2013 at 8:09
13

Does the IsVisible method give you the value you are looking for?

1
  • IsVisible certainly is an effective way of determining an interface's internal visibility. Jul 28, 2014 at 19:30
10

Here are some functions guaranteed to give the correct visibility of the type (probably an overkill implementation):

bool isPublic(Type t) {
    return
        t.IsVisible
        && t.IsPublic
        && !t.IsNotPublic
        && !t.IsNested
        && !t.IsNestedPublic
        && !t.IsNestedFamily
        && !t.IsNestedPrivate
        && !t.IsNestedAssembly
        && !t.IsNestedFamORAssem
        && !t.IsNestedFamANDAssem;
}

bool isInternal(Type t) {
    return
        !t.IsVisible
        && !t.IsPublic
        && t.IsNotPublic
        && !t.IsNested
        && !t.IsNestedPublic
        && !t.IsNestedFamily
        && !t.IsNestedPrivate
        && !t.IsNestedAssembly
        && !t.IsNestedFamORAssem
        && !t.IsNestedFamANDAssem;
}

// only nested types can be declared "protected"
bool isProtected(Type t) {
    return
        !t.IsVisible
        && !t.IsPublic
        && !t.IsNotPublic
        && t.IsNested
        && !t.IsNestedPublic
        && t.IsNestedFamily
        && !t.IsNestedPrivate
        && !t.IsNestedAssembly
        && !t.IsNestedFamORAssem
        && !t.IsNestedFamANDAssem;
}

// only nested types can be declared "private"
bool isPrivate(Type t) {
    return
        !t.IsVisible
        && !t.IsPublic
        && !t.IsNotPublic
        && t.IsNested
        && !t.IsNestedPublic
        && !t.IsNestedFamily
        && t.IsNestedPrivate
        && !t.IsNestedAssembly
        && !t.IsNestedFamORAssem
        && !t.IsNestedFamANDAssem;
}
1
  • It's possible to define internal nested classes. So this won't work in all cases. Oct 12, 2020 at 12:23
0

Ehh, I'm not quite sure, but e.g.

Public Function PublicFriendOrPrivate(t As Type) As String
    If t.IsPublic Then
        Return "Public"
    Else
        If t.IsNotPublic AndAlso t.IsNested Then
            Return "Private"
        Else
            Return "Friend"
        End If
    End If
End Function

'Note 'Friend' equals 'Internal' in C#.

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