186

So far whenever I needed to use a conditional statement within a Widget I have done the following (Using Center and Containers as simplified dummy examples):

new Center(
  child: condition == true ? new Container() : new Container()
)

Though when I tried using an if/else statement it would lead to an Dead code warning:

new Center(
  child: 
    if(condition == true){
      new Container();
    }else{
      new Container();
    }
)

Interestingly enough I tried with a switch case statement and it gives me the same warning and thus I cannot run the code. Am I doing something wrong or is it so that one cannot use if/else or switch statements without flutter thinking there is dead code?

2
  • 1
    If you want to insert a block where widgets should be instantiated you probably better build your widget in class methods Apr 8 '18 at 0:15
  • Center( child:Builder(builder:(context){ if(true) return widget1(); else return widget2(); }) ) Jun 14 '20 at 6:05

24 Answers 24

257

Actually you can use if/else and switch and any other statement inline in dart / flutter.

Use an immediate anonymous function

class StatmentExample extends StatelessWidget {
  Widget build(BuildContext context) {
    return Text((() {
      if(true){
        return "tis true";}

      return "anything but true";
    })());
  }
}

ie wrap your statements in a function

(() {
  // your code here
}())

I would heavily recommend against putting too much logic directly with your UI 'markup' but I found that type inference in Dart needs a little bit of work so it can be sometimes useful in scenarios like that.

Use the ternary operator

condition ? Text("True") : null,

Use If or For statements or spread operators in collections

children: [
  ...manyItems,
  oneItem,
  if(canIKickIt)
    ...kickTheCan
  for (item in items)
    Text(item)

Use a method

child: getWidget()

Widget getWidget() {
  if (x > 5) ...
  //more logic here and return a Widget

Redefine switch statement

As another alternative to the ternary operator, you could create a function version of the switch statement such as in the following post https://stackoverflow.com/a/57390589/1058292.

  child: case2(myInput,
  {
    1: Text("Its one"),
    2: Text("Its two"),
  }, Text("Default"));
6
  • 15
    In my opinion, this is the most complete answer, thanks @orangesherbert Aug 9 '19 at 3:10
  • 3
    Just a note if anyone gets stuck, if you are using Provider to rebuild your widgets on global state change, and you are getting data via "Provider.of", your conditional statement may not be re-evaluated until some other action rebuilds your widget. You need to be getting your conditional variable via "Consumer" that is being returned to the Widget build function, then your conditional statement should be properly re-evaluated as global state changes. Jan 5 '20 at 0:59
  • 1
    One of the best things for good practices in dart/flutter
    – Kohls
    Sep 29 '20 at 12:44
  • which one is better in ternary code? using null or empty Container() ?
    – buncis
    Apr 17 at 18:58
  • where can u put the style in, by the immediate anonymous funtion? for exampe: style: TextStyle(color: Colors.white),
    – jauki
    Jun 26 at 12:12
84

In Dart, if/else and switch are statements not expressions. They don't return a value so you can't pass them to constructor params. If you have a lot of conditional logic in your build method, then it is a good practice to try and simplify it. For example, you can move self-contained logic to methods, and use if/else statements to initialize local variables which you can later use.

Using a method and if/else

Widget _buildChild() {
  if (condition) {
    return ...
  }
  return ...
}

Widget build(BuildContext context) {
  return new Container(child: _buildChild());
}

Using an if/else

Widget build(BuildContext context) {
  Widget child;
  if (condition) {
    child = ...
  } else {
    child = ...
  }
  return new Container(child: child);
}
2
  • 1
    This should be the correct answer! Thank you for this clarification it helped me!
    – Slamit
    Jul 17 '20 at 7:42
  • 1
    What if you have a deep tree, and conditionally want to render something in the tree? Duplicate? Or will I have to split the tree somehow?
    – Jeppe
    Jun 25 at 17:52
71

I personally use if/else statement in children with this kind of block statement. It only supports on Dart version 2.3.0 above.

if / else

Column(
    children: [
        if (_selectedIndex == 0) ...[
          DayScreen(),
        ] else ...[
          StatsScreen(),
        ],
    ],
 ),

if / else if

Column(
    children: [
        if (_selectedIndex == 0) ...[
          DayScreen(),
        ] else if(_selectedIndex == 1)...[
          StatsScreen(),
        ],
    ],
 ),

multiple widgets example

Column(
    children: [
        if (_selectedIndex == 0) ...[
          DayScreen(),
          AboutScreen(),
          InfoScreen(),
        ] else if(_selectedIndex == 1)...[
          HomeScreen(),
          StatsScreen(),
        ],
    ],
 ),
1
  • 12
    That ...[] trick is awesome. It's a detail that no other answer mentioned, but it's very useful if you want to add multiple widgets conditionally.
    – NatoBoram
    Jan 29 at 16:14
52

In such a case I would recommand using the ternary operator:

child: condition ? Container() : Center()

and try to avoid code of the form:

if (condition) return A else return B

which is needlessly more verbose than the ternary operator.

But if more logic is needed you may also:

Use the Builder widget

The Builder widget is meant for allowing the use of a closure when a child widget is required:

A platonic widget that calls a closure to obtain its child widget.

It is convenient anytime you need logic to build a widget, it avoids the need to create a dedicated function.

You use the Builder widget as the child, you provide your logic in its builder method:

Center(
  child: Builder(
    builder: (context) {
      // any logic needed...
      final condition = _whateverLogicNeeded();
      
      return condition
          ? Container();
          : Center();
    }
  )
)

The Builder provides a convenient place to hold the creational logic. It is more straightforward than the immediate anonymous function proposed by atreeon.

Also I agree that the logic should be extracted from the UI code, but when it's really UI logic it is sometimes more legible to keep it there.

1
  • this worked for me pretty well for drawer items click and updating body Sep 24 '20 at 18:38
40

For the record, Dart 2.3 added the ability to use if/else statements in Collection literals. This is now done the following way:

return Column(children: <Widget>[
  Text("hello"),
  if (condition)
     Text("should not render if false"),
  Text("world")
],);

Flutter Issue #28181 - Inline conditional rendering in list

7
  • I have dart 2.5 but I get error running above code. It says ` this code is required to be compatible with earlier versions. try updating SDK constraints`
    – Aseem
    Dec 14 '19 at 19:50
  • emmm, interesting~
    – Haojen
    Dec 16 '19 at 9:53
  • Do they add for loop feature? if so how to implement it? Jan 10 '20 at 11:12
  • Doesn't work with a single widget like AppBar -> leading: or child:
    – Alex Vang
    Mar 8 '20 at 9:27
26

I found out that an easy way to use conditional logic to build Flutter UI is to keep the logic outside of the UI. Here is a function to return two different colors:

Color getColor(int selector) {
  if (selector % 2 == 0) {
    return Colors.blue;
  } else {
    return Colors.blueGrey;
  }
}

The function is used below to to set the background of the CircleAvatar.

new ListView.builder(
  itemCount: users.length,
  itemBuilder: (BuildContext context, int index) {
    return new Column(
      children: <Widget>[
        new ListTile(
          leading: new CircleAvatar(
            backgroundColor: getColor(index),
            child: new Text(users[index].name[0])
          ),
          title: new Text(users[index].login),
          subtitle: new Text(users[index].name),
        ),
        new Divider(height: 2.0),
      ],
    );
  },
);

Very neat as you can reuse your color selector function in several widgets.

1
  • 2
    I tried this and worked for me the exact way. Thanks
    – Ajay Kumar
    Jun 17 '19 at 14:55
20

You can simply use a conditional statement a==b?c:d

For example :

Container(
  color: Colors.white,
  child: ('condition')
  ? Widget1(...)
  : Widget2(...)
)

I hope you got the idea.

Suppose if there is no else condition you can use a SizedBox.shrink()

Container(
      color: Colors.white,
      child: ('condition')
       ? Widget1(...)
       : SizedBox.shrink()
    )

If it is a column no need to write ?: operator

Column(
 children: <Widget>[
  if('condition')
    Widget1(...),
 ],
)
3
  • 1
    What if there is no else condition? In Columns, saying a==b?c:null will not work
    – cwhisperer
    Apr 16 '20 at 5:43
  • 1
    You can simply use SizedBox.shrick() as the second widget. updating the answer.
    – Afinas EM
    Apr 16 '20 at 11:39
  • 1
    If it is a column then you can use if condition directly without else case: `if('condition') widget()'
    – Afinas EM
    Apr 16 '20 at 11:43
10

Here is the solution. I have fixed it. Here is the code

child: _status(data[index]["status"]),

Widget _status(status) {
  if (status == "3") {
    return Text('Process');
  } else if(status == "1") {
    return Text('Order');
  } else {
    return Text("Waiting");
  }
}
1
  • How to using it
    – ardi
    Mar 31 '19 at 6:11
8

if you use a list of widgets you can use this:

class HomePage extends StatelessWidget {
  bool notNull(Object o) => o != null;
  @override
  Widget build(BuildContext context) {
    var condition = true;
    return Scaffold(
      appBar: AppBar(
        title: Text("Provider Demo"),
      ),
      body: Center(
          child: Column(
        children: <Widget>[
          condition? Text("True"): null,
          Container(
            height: 300,
            width: MediaQuery.of(context).size.width,
            child: Text("Test")
          )
        ].where(notNull).toList(),
      )),
    );
  }
}
3
  • condition? Text("True"): null, this does an error Asertion false in console, on runtime execution
    – exequielc
    Jul 14 '19 at 16:57
  • @exequielc you must add .where(notNull).toList() and the end of the WidgetList and the method bool notNull(Object o) => o != null;. Try whole example...
    – otto
    Jul 15 '19 at 6:42
  • 1
    As of Dart 2.3 to conditionally include a widget in a list you can use: [Text("Hello"), if(world) Text("World")] Jul 26 '19 at 23:46
8

Lol after months of using ?: I just find out that I can use this:

Column(
     children: [
       if (true) Text('true') else Text('false'),
     ],
   )
6

Another alternative: for 'switch's' like statements, with a lot of conditions, I like to use maps:

return Card(
        elevation: 0,
        margin: EdgeInsets.all(1),
        child: conditions(widget.coupon)[widget.coupon.status] ??
            (throw ArgumentError('invalid status')));


conditions(Coupon coupon) => {
      Status.added_new: CheckableCouponTile(coupon.code),
      Status.redeemed: SimpleCouponTile(coupon.code),
      Status.invalid: SimpleCouponTile(coupon.code),
      Status.valid_not_redeemed: SimpleCouponTile(coupon.code),
    };

It's easier to add/remove elements to the condition list without touch the conditional statement.

Another example:

var condts = {
  0: Container(),
  1: Center(),
  2: Row(),
  3: Column(),
  4: Stack(),
};

class WidgetByCondition extends StatelessWidget {
  final int index;
  WidgetByCondition(this.index);
  @override
  Widget build(BuildContext context) {
    return condts[index];
  }
}
6

Aside from the ternary operator, you can also use Builder widget if you have operation needs to be performed before the condition statement.

Container(
  child: Builder(builder: (context) {
     /// some operation here ...
     if(someCondition) {
       return Text('A');
     }
     else return Text('B');
    })
 )
1
  • Great answer! If you have one if-else condition ternary operator should suffice but if you have multiple if-else if-else conditions or switch cases, the Builder widget should be an appropriate solution.
    – ritz
    Jun 3 at 16:45
4

****You can also use conditions by using this method** **

 int _moneyCounter = 0;
  void _rainMoney(){
    setState(() {
      _moneyCounter +=  100;
    });
  }

new Expanded(
          child: new Center(
            child: new Text('\$$_moneyCounter', 

            style:new TextStyle(
              color: _moneyCounter > 1000 ? Colors.blue : Colors.amberAccent,
              fontSize: 47,
              fontWeight: FontWeight.w800
            )

            ),
          ) 
        ),
1
  • This is the most clear explanation to using conditions in attributes
    – vin shaba
    Aug 8 at 23:23
4

With a button

bool _paused = false;

CupertinoButton(
  child: _paused ? Text('Play') : Text('Pause'),
  color: Colors.blue,
  onPressed: () {
    setState(() {
      _paused = !_paused;
    });
  },
),
3

This is great article and conversation. I tried to use the ternary operator as described. But the code didn't work resulting in an error as mentioned.

Column(children: [ condition? Text("True"): null,],);

The ternary example above is miss leading. Dart will respond with an error that a null was returned instead of widget. You can't return null. The correct way will be to return a widget:

Column(children: [ condition? Text("True"): Text("false"),],); 

In order for the ternary to work you need to return a Widget. If you don't want to return anything you can return a empty container.

Column(children: [ condition? Text("True"): Container(),],); 

Good luck.

3

In flutter if you want to do conditional rendering, you may do this:

Column(
   children: <Widget>[
     if (isCondition == true)
        Text('The condition is true'),
   ],
 );

But what if you want to use a tertiary (if-else) condition? when the child widget is multi-layered.

You can use this for its solution flutter_conditional_rendering a flutter package which enhances conditional rendering, supports if-else and switch conditions.

If-Else condition:

Column(
      children: <Widget>[
        Conditional.single(
          context: context,
          conditionBuilder: (BuildContext context) => someCondition == true,
          widgetBuilder: (BuildContext context) => Text('The condition is true!'),
          fallbackBuilder: (BuildContext context) => Text('The condition is false!'),
        ),
      ],
    );

Switch condition:

Column(
      children: <Widget>[
        ConditionalSwitch.single<String>(
          context: context,
          valueBuilder: (BuildContext context) => 'A',
          caseBuilders: {
            'A': (BuildContext context) => Text('The value is A!'),
            'B': (BuildContext context) => Text('The value is B!'),
          },
          fallbackBuilder: (BuildContext context) => Text('None of the cases matched!'),
        ),
      ],
    );

If you want to conditionally render a list of widgets (List<Widget>) instead of a single one. Use Conditional.list() and ConditionalSwitch.list()!

3

You can use ternary operator for conditional statements in dart, It's use is simple

(condition) ? statement1 : statement2

if the condition is true then the statement1 will be executed otherwise statement2.

Taking a practical example

Center(child: condition ? Widget1() : Widget2())

Remember if you are going to use null as Widget2 it is better to use SizedBox.shrink() because some parent widgets will throw an exception after getting a null child.

3

EDIT: I no longer recommend the solution I posted below because I realized that using this method, both the child for the true result and the child for the false result are built but only one is used, which unnecessarily slows the code.


PREVIOUS ANSWER:

In my app I created a WidgetChooser widget so I can choose between widgets without conditional logic:

WidgetChooser(
      condition: true,
      trueChild: Text('This widget appears if the condition is true.'),
      falseChild: Text('This widget appears if the condition is false.'),
    );

This is the source for the WidgetChooser widget:

import 'package:flutter/widgets.dart';

class WidgetChooser extends StatelessWidget {
  final bool condition;
  final Widget trueChild;
  final Widget falseChild;

  WidgetChooser({@required this.condition, @required this.trueChild, @required this.falseChild});

  @override
  Widget build(BuildContext context) {
    if (condition) {
      return trueChild;
    } else {
      return falseChild;
    }
  }
}
2
  • Very useful, thanks for sharing!
    – Petro
    Dec 9 '20 at 18:45
  • Interesting! 👍
    – mahfuz
    Feb 26 at 10:27
1

You can use builder in following manning: I have consider a condition where we can get image url as null, hence if null I show a shrink sizedbox as it has no property a completely void widget.

Builder(builder: (BuildContext context) {
  if (iconPath != null) {
    return ImageIcon(
      AssetImage(iconPath!),
      color: AppColors.kPrimaryColor,
    );
  } else {
    return SizedBox.shrink();
  }
})
1

Conditional rendering in Flutter can easily be done by proviso package. It has a comprehensive set of conditional widgets and builders to make a more readable and simpler conditional statement code.

The API & helpers consist of but not limited to:

conditional widgets & builders:

ConditionWidget(
  condition: starred,
  widget: Icon(
    Icons.favorite
  ),
  fallback: fallbackWidget
)

ConditionBuilder(
  condition: (_) => someCondition,
  trueBuilder: (_) => trueWidget,
  fallbackBuilder: (_) => fallbackWidget
)

switch case conditions:

SwitchCaseBuilder.widget<String>(
  context: context,
  condition: (_) => '1',
  caseBuilders: {'1': (_) => someWidget(), '2': (_) => someWidget()},
  fallbackBuilder: (_) => fallbackWidget,
);  

or even a conditional parent widget

ConditionalWrap(
  shouldWrap: shouldWrapChildInParent,
  child: Container(),
  parentBuilder: (child) => Container(
    child: child,
  ),
)

API supports either a single or multiple widgets rendering. You are welcome to give it a try.

0
child: Container(
   child: isFile == true ? 
            Image.network(pathfile, width: 300, height: 200, fit: BoxFit.cover) : 
            Text(message.subject.toString(), style: TextStyle(color: Colors.white),
      ),
),
1
  • Please don't post only code as answer, but also provide an explanation what your code does and how it solves the problem of the question. Answers with an explanation are usually more helpful and of better quality, and are more likely to attract upvotes. Jan 23 at 16:34
0

I have no idea whether it's a good practice, but I am using:

class StatmentExample extends StatelessWidget {
  Widget build(BuildContext context) {
    return pageValue==1 ? Page1():pageValue== 2? Page2():pageValue==3 ? Page3():Page4();
  }
}
0

Do it like this

Widget showIf(bool shouldShow, Widget widget) {
if (shouldShow) {
  return widget;
} else {
  return Container();
}}

So when you want to show something with condition you do like say

Column(children: [showIf(myConditionIsTrue, myComplexWidget)])
-5

Only if vibrating widget

if(bool = true) Container(

child: ....

),

OR

if(bool = true) Container(

child: ....

) else new Container(child: lalala),

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