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The criterion is that at most one empty object is allowed and each object can be repeated only once.

Here's my attempt so far.

Suppose that n = 3, k = 3. Let 0 denote as an empty object.

Some possible examples:

011 101 110 112
012 102 120 113
013 103 130 121
... ... ... ...
033 303 330 332

So, I create a "pool" of { 0, 1, 1, 2, 2, 3, 3 }. Three objects will be selected from the pool, by using a permutation of logical vector (ex. a logical vector { 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1 } chooses 1, 3, 3 from the pool)

Then all the permutations of the three selected objects are added to the set.

However... there will be some repetition, since { 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1 } is considered equivalent to { 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 1, 1, } as both will choose 1, 3, 3 from the pool.

This code becomes pretty computationally expensive for higher n and k, such as when n = 8 and k = 6. Is there a more effective way to do this?

My C++ code:

set< vector<int> > generate_kperms ( int n, int k )
{

  set< vector<int> > kperms;

  // create vector of integers { 0, 1, 1, 2, 2, ..., n, n }
  vector<int> pool( 2*n + 1 );
  pool[0] = 0;
  for ( int i = 1; i <= n; ++i )
    pool[2*i-1] = pool[2*i] = i;

  // create logical vector with k true values, to be permuted
  vector<bool> logical( pool.size() );
  fill( logical.end()-k, logical.end(), true );

  do {
    vector<int> kperm( k );
    vector<int>::iterator itr = kperm.begin();
    for ( int idx = 0; idx < (int) pool.size(); ++idx ) {
      if ( logical[idx] )
        *(itr++) = pool[idx];
    }
    do {
      kperms.insert( kperm );
    } while ( next_permutation ( kperm.begin(), kperm.end() ) );
  } while ( next_permutation( logical.begin(), logical.end() ) );

  return kperms;

}       /* -----  end of function generate_kperms  ----- */

1 Answer 1

2

Observe that if you generate all permutations of pool, then the length-k prefixes are almost what you want, just with a large number of consecutive duplicates. An easy but decent way to generate all of the k-permutations is to skip the duplicates by sorting the n - k suffix to be descending before calling next_permutation. To wit,

#include <iostream>
#include <set>
#include <vector>

using std::cout;
using std::greater;
using std::sort;
using std::vector;

vector<vector<int>> generate_kperms(int n, int k) {
  vector<vector<int>> kperms;
  vector<int> pool(2 * n + 1);
  pool[0] = 0;
  for (int i = 1; i <= n; ++i) {
    pool[2 * i - 1] = pool[2 * i] = i;
  }
  do {
    kperms.push_back(vector<int>(pool.begin(), pool.begin() + k));
    sort(pool.begin() + k, pool.end(), greater<int>());
  } while (next_permutation(pool.begin(), pool.end()));
  return kperms;
}

int main() {
  for (const vector<int> &kperm : generate_kperms(8, 6)) {
    for (int x : kperm) {
      cout << x << ' ';
    }
    cout << '\n';
  }
}

You might be able to get more speed by implementing your own version of next_permutation that treats the n - k suffix as reverse sorted, but I can't seem to find it in Knuth 4A right now.

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