1

I made a code in which malloc() is called, but it is returning a null pointer. When I call the same malloc() in main() and pass to the function, it is working totally fine. So please tell me what is the problem.

Here is my code. I am having problems with the malloc() in the function reverse(). The malloc()s in other functions are working fine. So why is there problem with the one in that function. I have enough memory in my computer, so that's definitely not the problem.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
typedef struct node
{
    int data;
    struct node *next;
} SNode;


typedef struct
{
    int count;
    SNode *top;
} Stack;

int isSEmpty(Stack *s)
{
    return (s->count==0);
}

void push(Stack *s, int x)
{
    SNode *temp = (SNode *)malloc(sizeof(SNode));
    temp->data = x;
    temp->next = s->top;
    s->top = temp;
    s->count++;
}

int pop(Stack *s)
{
    if (isSEmpty(s))
    {
        printf("Underflow");
        return -1;
    }
    SNode *temp = s->top;
    s->top = s->top->next;
    int t = temp->data;
    free(temp);
    s->count--;
    return t;
}
typedef struct qnode
{
    int data;
    struct qnode *next, *prev;
} QNode;

typedef struct
{
    QNode *front, *rear;
    int count;
} Queue;

int isQEmpty(Queue *q)
{
    return (q->count==0);
}

void enQueue(Queue *q, int x)
{
    QNode *temp = (QNode *)malloc(sizeof(QNode));
    temp->data = x;
    temp->prev=q->rear;
    temp->next = NULL;
    q->rear->next = temp;
    q->rear = temp;
    q->count++;
    if (q->count==1)
    {
        q->front = q->rear;
    }
}

int deQueue(Queue *q)
{
    if (isQEmpty(q))
    {
        printf("Underflow");
        return -1;
    }
    QNode *temp = q->front;
    q->front = q->front->next;
    int t = temp->data;
    free(temp);
    q->count--;
    return t;
}
void reverse(Queue *q)
{
    Stack *s = (Stack *)malloc(sizeof(Stack));
    s->count = 0;

    while (!isQEmpty(q))
    {
        push(s, deQueue(q));
    }
    while (!isSEmpty(s))
    {
        enQueue(q, pop(s));
    }
}

int main()
{
    char p = 'y';
    Queue *q = (Queue *)malloc(sizeof(Queue));

    q->count = 0;
    while (p =='y')
    {
        printf("Enter data to be Enqueued: ");
        int d;
        scanf("%d", &d);
        enQueue(q, d);
        printf("Do you want to enter more data? y/n:");
        scanf(" %c", &p);
    }
    printf("Original queue Front: %d Rear: %d\n", q->front->data, q->rear->data);
    reverse(q);
    printf("Reversed queue Front: %d Rear: %d", q->front->data, q->rear->data);
    return 0;
}
11
  • 1
    You have several mallocs here. Which one returns 0? Apr 8, 2018 at 0:26
  • How do you know that malloc returns NULL if you are not checking it? In general malloc returns NULL if there is no more memory left.
    – Pablo
    Apr 8, 2018 at 0:28
  • Format your code properly, specially if you want/need others to read it. Apr 8, 2018 at 0:31
  • @HolyBlackCat i specified in the question, the one in reverse function
    – Gameatro
    Apr 8, 2018 at 0:37
  • @Pablo I removed the checking statement while posting the code as it is not part of main code.
    – Gameatro
    Apr 8, 2018 at 0:38

2 Answers 2

5

Your program is hardly running out of memory, which is why malloc() would return NULL. Instead a combination of bad programming style and messy code, is causing problems related to access of uninitialized memory which is undefined behavior, once you trigger the UB you can't predict program's behavior anymore.

The first thing you need to fix, is avoiding this kind of construction

q->rear->next = temp;

because q->rear might be NULL and thus you would invoke UB if you dereference it.

Then you need to initialize the members of the struct explicitly, malloc() only allocates memory for you to use, it does no initialization whatsoever, a good method to do it would be to create a function that allocates and initializes empty instances, like the following

Queue *queue_new(int count) 
{
    Queue *queue;
    queue = malloc(sizeof(*queue));
    if (queue == NULL)
        return NULL;
    queue->count = count;
    queue->front = NULL;
    queue->rear = NULL;
    return queue;
}

Also, don't mix declarations with code. I had to search for the definition of Queue to write the above function, and I did so with the find/replace feature of my code editor.

Place all structure and type definitions together above all the code, to make it easy to find any one of them.

2
  • Or you could use calloc instead which set the allocated memory to 0, great for initialization of structures with pointers.
    – Pablo
    Apr 8, 2018 at 0:51
  • @Pablo If you want to set every member to 0 yes, but in my example you could create something like queue_new(4); in which case using calloc() would only avoid the need to explicitly setting front and rear to NULL. I generally avoid calloc() unless I REALLY want to initialize to 0. Apr 8, 2018 at 0:53
3

You aren't initializing all the fields of the *q struct that you initiallay allocate in `main():

Queue *q = (Queue *)malloc(sizeof(Queue));

q->count = 0;

Then you pass that q pointer to enQueue() and do things like:

q->rear->next = temp;

I think you may also use q->front without having initialized it.

These things are undefined behavior and in your case are probably corrupting the heap causing malloc() to not work as you expect. If you're working on Linux valgrind might be useful.

6
  • no, the problem is in reverse function. i used some printfs and ifs a breakpoints, the malloc there is returing null pointer.
    – Gameatro
    Apr 8, 2018 at 0:45
  • 1
    So what? You just don't notice the problem until reverse() is called. The problem in enQueue() (and/or other similar problems) is setting up the problem in reverse(). Apr 8, 2018 at 0:47
  • 1
    @Gameatro Listen to more experienced programmers, I am 100% sure the problem is exactly at q->rear->next = temp. I know it because I used a tool called valgrind on your program and found it out. Apr 8, 2018 at 0:49
  • but why is it causing problem in reverse function?
    – Gameatro
    Apr 8, 2018 at 1:04
  • @Gameatro It's called Undefined Behavior. Google it. Apr 8, 2018 at 1:23

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