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I have some data in my table (tb1):

PK   datetime1               datetime2               grp
--------------------------------------------------------
 1   2016-01-01 00:30:10     2016-01-01 00:33:10      1
 2   2013-01-01 00:30:10     2013-01-01 00:34:10      2

I am trying to find the number of events based on datetime1, datetime2, and location.

So this is my query:

 select count(*), datetime1, datetime2, grp 
 from tb1
 group by datetime1, datetime2, grp

No issue here.

To an extent, I would like to find the count based on:

when the datetime1 difference between the two consecutive (can be achieved by lead function) row is less than 1 sec and the datetime2 difference between the two consecutive row is less than 1 sec, and grp.

I can use lead to finding the difference between two consecutive row, but not sure how I can apply count function here to group by time similarity between two consecutive rows.

To make this simpler, I am looking for something like this:

if

 select 
     count(*), grp, ....
 from 
     tb1
 where 
     datediff(s, lead(datetime1, 1, 1)  over (partition by grp order by datetime1)) = 1 
     and datediff(s, lead(datetime2, 1, 1) = 1 over (partition by grp order by datetime2) = 1 
group by
    lead(datetime1, 1, 1) over (partition by grp order by datetime1), 
    lead(datetime2, 1, 1) over (partition by grp order by datetime2), 
    grp 

Please let me know if there is a need for additional clarification.

7
  • 1
    IS there an and missing 'when the datetime1 difference between the two consecutive row is less than 1 sec AND the datetime2 difference between the two consecutive row is less than 1 sec'
    – P.Salmon
    Apr 8, 2018 at 9:42
  • corrected, thx, also the where and group by had a wrong order:) Apr 8, 2018 at 9:45
  • Side note: You keep writing the phrase "two consecutive row" - but in a relational database the rows of a table are unsorted by nature, so there is no such thing "consecutive rows". Apr 8, 2018 at 9:49
  • I am aware of this. I am achieving this by using the lead function to find the successor row, added that to the question, thx Apr 8, 2018 at 9:54
  • 1
    Imagine row 2 could be grouped with row 1 or row 3 how would you avoid double counting?
    – P.Salmon
    Apr 8, 2018 at 10:12

2 Answers 2

2

I generated some sample data. Check if this is what you are looking for. I put necessary comments in code. Query can be more concise, but I wanted to explain as much as I can on every step:

declare @table table (PK int, datetime1 datetime, datetime2 datetime, grp int)
insert into @table values
(1, '2016-01-01 00:30:14.000', '2016-01-01 00:33:15.000', 1),
(2, '2016-01-01 00:30:10.232', '2016-01-01 00:33:10.000', 1),
(3, '2016-01-01 00:30:10.111', '2016-01-01 00:33:10.234', 1),
(4, '2016-01-01 00:30:12.000', '2016-01-01 00:33:15.000', 2),
(5, '2016-01-01 00:30:10.000', '2016-01-01 00:33:10.234', 2),
(6, '2016-01-01 00:30:10.222', '2016-01-01 00:33:10.000', 2)

select min(pk), min(datetime1), count(*) from (
    --in this query, based on differences, we will generate grouping column called IsClose
    select *, case when (diff1 <= 1000 and diff2 <= 1000) or (diff3 <= 1000 and diff4 <= 1000) then 1 else 0 end [IsClose] from (
        --this query gives to additionals columns with absolute differences between consecutive rows ordered by PK column
        select *,
               abs(datediff(ms, datetime1, lag(datetime1) over (order by pk))) [diff1],
               abs(datediff(ms, datetime2, lag(datetime2) over (order by pk))) [diff2],
               abs(datediff(ms, datetime1, lead(datetime1) over (order by pk))) [diff3],
               abs(datediff(ms, datetime2, lead(datetime2) over (order by pk))) [diff4]  
        from @table
    ) [a]
) [a] group by grp, IsClose
2
  • Thanks @michał turczyn, very nice idea, I applied that and came up with this sqlfiddle.com/#!18/b4a43/1/0 Cannot understand why you used both lead and lag. Second, why you used PK in the most inner query? it should be partition by lead order by datetime. In your case grp is ignored and only sort based on PK which is wrong as the query may pick sth wrong for the next row. I am sure this gives the wrong result. Thanks once again. Upvoted as it really gave me the idea Apr 8, 2018 at 20:00
  • @mohsenhs I'm glad I could help :) Apr 9, 2018 at 5:45
2

This is based on int, but same approach would work with datetime

declare @T table (pk int identity primary key, val int);
insert into @T values ('1'), ('9'), ('9'), ('11'), ('2'), ('2'), ('3'), ('5'), ('7'), ('8');
select tt.pk, tt.val 
     , sum(ll) over (order by val, pk) as grp
from  ( select * 
             , case when lag(val,1) over (order by val, pk) is null 
                      or val - lag(val,1) over (order by val, pk) <= 1 then 0 
                    else 1 
               end as ll
          from @T t
      ) tt
order by val, pk;

pk          val         grp
----------- ----------- -----------
1           1           0
5           2           0
6           2           0
7           3           0
8           5           1
9           7           2
10          8           2
2           9           2
3           9           2
4           11          3
1

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