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I am using Docker Compose to deploy my applications. In my docker-compose.yml I have a container my-frontend which must know the public IP of the backend my-backend. The image my-frontend is NodeJS application which runs in the client's browser.

Before I did this:

my-backend:
  image: my-backend:latest
  ports:
    - 81:80
my-frontend:
  image: my-frontend:latest
  ports:
    - 80:80
  environment:
    - BACKEND=http://localhost:81

This works fine when I deploy to a local Docker daemon and when the client runs locally.

I am now migrating to a remote Docker daemon. In this situation, the client does not run on the same host as the Docker daemon any more. Hence, I need to alter the environment variable BACKEND in my-frontend:

  environment:
    - BACKEND=http://<ip-of-daemon>:81

When I hardcode <ip-of-daemon> to the actual ip of the Docker daemon, everything is working fine. But I am wondering if there is a way to dynamically fill this in? So I can use the same docker-compose.yml for any remote Docker daemon.

8
  • If the frontend wants to be able to contact the backend, then you don't need the ports at all. All containers will join a common network, and they will have network aliases set to the names of the containers. So, your frontend can just access http://my-backend:81. I would suggest removing those port entries unless you also need to expose them to the outside world.
    – halfer
    Apr 8, 2018 at 15:31
  • @halfer I need to expose the port of the backend and the frontend. The frontend image is an nginx container which serves the JS files. It injects the BACKEND variable into the source code before serving. So the frontend runs on the browser of the client, outside the docker network. It needs to be able to communicate with the backend, hence this port must be present as well.
    – John Somen
    Apr 8, 2018 at 18:30
  • OK, fair enough. Nevertheless, my remark stands - try getting a shell on your frontend container and pinging the backend network name my-backend. Thus, in Docker Compose, you don't need to know it's IP - just use the name.
    – halfer
    Apr 8, 2018 at 18:32
  • The my-frontend container is a dedicated nginx process responsible for service the JS files, while injecting the backend URL in one of these files. The client however is some browser, possibly your browser on your phone. This browser has zero knowledge about the my-backend host? It's the browser who is connecting to the my-backend container, not the nginx process in my-frontend.
    – John Somen
    Apr 8, 2018 at 18:40
  • 1
    Thanks for the edit! The term public IP makes more sense indeed. I appreciate your thoughts.
    – John Somen
    Apr 8, 2018 at 18:51

2 Answers 2

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With Docker Compose, your Docker containers will all appear on the same machine. Perhaps you are using tools like Swarm or Kubernetes in order to distribute your containers on different hosts, which would mean that your backend and frontend containers would indeed be accessible via different public IP addresses.

The usual way of dealing with this is to use a frontend proxy like Traefik on a single entry point. This means that from the browser's perspective, the IP address for your frontend and backend is the same. Internally, the proxy will use filtering rules to direct traffic to the correct LAN name. The usual approach is to use a URL path prefix like /backend/.

You correctly mentioned in the comments that, assuming your frontend container is accessible on a static public IP, you could just internally proxy from there to your backend, using NginX. That should work just fine.

Either of these approaches will allow a single IP to appear to "share" ports - this resolves the problem of wanting to listen on the same IP on 80/443 in more than one container. You need to try to avoid non-standard ports for backend calls, since some networks can block them (e.g. mobile networks, corporate firewalled environments).

I am not sure what an alternative would be to those approaches. You can certainly obtain a machine's public IP if you can run code on the host, but if your container orchestration is sending containers to machines, the only code that will run is inside each container, and I don't believe public IP information is exposed there.

Update based on your use-case

I had initially assumed from your question that you were expecting your containers to spin up on arbitrary hosts in a Docker farm. In fact, your current approach confirmed in the comments is a number of non-connected Docker hosts, so whenever you deploy, your containers are guaranteed to share a public IP. I understand the purpose behind your question a bit better now - you were wanting to specify a base URL for your backend, including a fully-qualified domain, non-standard port, and URL path prefix.

As I indicated in the discussion, this is probably not necessary, since you are able to put a proxy URL path prefix (/backend) in your frontend NginX. This negates the need for a non-standard port.

If you wanted to specify a custom backend prefix (e.g. /backend/v1 to version your API) then you could do that in env vars in your Docker Compose config.

If you need to refer to the backend's fully-qualified address in your JavaScript for the purposes of connecting to AJAX/WebSocket servers, you can just derive this from window.location.host. In your dev env this will be a bare IP address, and in your remote envs, it sounds like you have a domain.

Addendum

Some of the confusion on this question was about what sort of IP addresses we are referring to. For example:

I believe that the public IP of my-backend is equal to the docker daemon's IP

Well, your Docker host has several IP addresses, and the public address is just one of them. For example, the virtual network interface docker0 is the LAN IP of your Docker host, and if you ask for the IP of your Docker host, that would indeed be a correct answer (though of course it is not accessible on the public internet).

In fact, I would say the LAN address belongs to the daemon (since Docker sets it up) and the public IP does not (it is a feature of the box, not Docker).

In any of your Docker hosts, try this command:

ifconfig docker0

That will give you some information about your host's IP, and is useful if a Docker container wishes to contact the host (e.g. if you want to connect to a service that is not running in a container). It is quite useful to pass the IP herein into a container as an env var, in order to allow this connection to take place.

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  • 1
    (I have deleted my prior comments and summarised the discussion by way of an answer update, so it could be useful to future readers. Let me know if there is anything I've missed out).
    – halfer
    Apr 8, 2018 at 22:08
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    I have deleted my comments as well, as your summary covers these. Thank you very much for your guidance!
    – John Somen
    Apr 9, 2018 at 7:04
0
my-backend:
  image: my-backend:latest
  ports:
    - 81:80
my-frontend:
  image: my-frontend:latest
  ports:
    - 80:80
  environment:
    - BACKEND="${BACKEND_ENV}"

Where BACKEND_ENV is and enviroment variable setted to the the docker daemon's ip.

In the machine where is docker-compose executed set the environment variable before.

export BACKEND_ENV="http://remoteip..."

Or just start the frontend pointing to the remote address

docker run -p 80:80 -e BACKEND='http://remote_backend_ip:81' my-frontend:latest
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  • I see ... sorry I didn't read properly... you can use enviroment variable
    – jonhid
    Apr 8, 2018 at 10:49
  • Edited my answer
    – jonhid
    Apr 8, 2018 at 10:51
  • Essentially, I want to resolve ${BACKEND_ENV} in your example to the docker daemon's ip, ideally dynamically/automatically. I would rather not set the environment variable manually.
    – John Somen
    Apr 8, 2018 at 10:52
  • You can also start the front end pointing to the remote backend ip without the docker-compose.. but either way you should inform the frontend of the backend ip.
    – jonhid
    Apr 8, 2018 at 11:15
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    @JohnSomen Usually people have a reverse-proxy in front of their backend servers, thus abstracting the exact ip(s) of them. So you just need to know the domain of your service ( xyz.com ), as ENV variable. Hope this helps! Apr 8, 2018 at 12:25

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