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I'm making a function that's repeatedly testing another function in order to get a value within a user-provided tolerance. I've tried to make it print an error-message in the case where more iterations are needed to get within the given tolerance, but this message never prints and I can't figure out why.

from math import e

def ctrapezoidal(f,a,b,n):
    h=((b-a)/n)
    y = (h/2)*(f(a)+f(b))
    for x in range(n-1):
        p = a + ((x+1)/n)*(b-a)
        y = y + h*(f(p))
    return y

def ctrap(f,a,b,n,tol):
    for x in range(n):
        if x is 0:
            continue
        elif x is 1:
            continue
        elif x is (n-1):
            if abs((ctrapezoidal(f,a,b,x)) - (ctrapezoidal(f,a,b,(x-1)))) < tol:
                print("The integral of the function between",a,"and",b,"approximates to",ctrapezoidal(f,a,b,x),"with a tolerance of",tol)
                break
            else:
                print("The approximation needs more iterations to calculate the integral to the given tolerance.")
                   #This error never shows, even when given too few iterations to compute.
                   #The if-statement works, though, since I've tried with values
                   #of n one integer higher than the needed number of iterations.
        else:
            if abs((ctrapezoidal(f,a,b,x)) - (ctrapezoidal(f,a,b,(x-1)))) < tol:
                print("The integral of the function between",a,"and",b,"approximates to",ctrapezoidal(f,a,b,x),"with a tolerance of",tol,". This calculation took",x,"iterations.")
                break
            else:
                continue

def g(x):
    y = 2*e**(2*x) + 2*x
    return y

ctrap(g,1,5,1331,1.e-4)

This is what I've written. The given n-value in the final line is the lowest value ctrap works properly for. Any ideas?

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  • 3
    Don't compare numbers with is. Use ==.
    – Aran-Fey
    Apr 8, 2018 at 10:14
  • @Aran-Fey thank you!
    – shaqman
    Apr 8, 2018 at 10:18

1 Answer 1

1

The problem comes from the line

        elif x is (n-1):

When you use is for comparison, Python tests the left and right sides to see if they represent literally the same object. For example, it might compare their memory addresses. But two integers that have the same numerical value will not, in general, be the same object. You can see this by firing up the interpreter and running

>>> 1331 is (1330 + 1)
False

This shows that the integer object that you get when you write 1331 in code is not the same integer object that you get when you write 1330 + 1, even though they have the same numerical value. That's why your comparison is failing; you have different objects representing the same integer and you're testing for object equality instead of numerical equality.

Use == for testing numerical equality instead.

>>> 1331 == (1330 + 1)
True

Note that the standard implementation of Python does cache integer objects up to and including 256, so there's only one instance per value. So integers up to 256 will compare object-equal as well:

>>> 256 is (255 + 1)
True
>>> 257 is (256 + 1)
False

You shouldn't rely on this, though.

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