20

I found a language construct I don't understand:

pub struct OpenOptions(fs_imp::OpenOptions);

I even created a compilable piece of code with those brackets but I still couldn't understand it:

struct Foo {
    bar: i32,
}

struct Baz(Foo);

fn main() {
    let mut x: Baz = Baz(Foo{ bar: 3 });
}

What are those round brackets for?

2

3 Answers 3

17

As pointed out in the comments, those are Tuple Structs. They are useful when you want to distinguish one tuple from others, but naming each of its fields would be redundant or needlessly verbose. In other words you clarify the purpose of a tuple by naming it.

Tuple structs can be used to create a simple value objects.

struct Color(i32, i32, i32);

let black = Color(0, 0, 0);
2
  • 8
    Inconveniently enough, a color is a bad example of a tuple struct :) Since it could be RGB, HSV, HSL, or any other 3-component encoding. But point taken.
    – Kroltan
    Commented Apr 8, 2018 at 13:19
  • Agree, enum could be used for RGB, HSV, HSL
    – rnofenko
    Commented Apr 17, 2023 at 4:04
0

I didn't think the example in the book (or in the selected answer) is as clear as it could be. What this syntax does is create a new type that has the same structure: possibly a 3 by i32 tuple like in the example, or a struct Foo as in your example. So you can't mix things of type Foo and type Baz. However, some experiments showed that giving it a type like Foo, really just provides it a 1 tuple. Consider this extension of your example:

#[derive(Debug)]
struct Foo {
    bar: i32,
}

#[derive(Debug)]
struct Baz(Foo);

fn main() {
    let mut x: Baz = Baz(Foo{ bar: 3 });
    let y: Baz = Baz { 0: Foo { bar: 4 }};
    let foo = Foo { bar: 5 };
    let z: Baz = Baz(foo,);
    println!("x {:?} x.0 {:?}", x, x.0);
    println!("y {:?}", y);
    println!("z {:?}", z);
}

So your x is a Baz constructed of a 1-tuple consisting of a Foo, which the println (x) and z's definition makes clear. The definition of y uses the more usual constructor syntax using the tuple index to locate Foo. You can't leave out the "0:".

-1

It is a "tuple struct". A struct is a pack of multiple values. For a typical struct, the field values are accessed by the field names. For the tuple struct, there is no field name, and the field values are accessed by the position indices, such as .0, .1. If it complains the field is not private, you can add pub, such as struct Baz(pub Foo). Once you see that it is just a pack of values with the positions as the access keys, it is pretty straightforward.

1
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    – Community Bot
    Commented Oct 19, 2022 at 8:35

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