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I tried porting the NN code presented here to Julia, hoping for a speed increase in training the network. On my desktop, this proved to be the case.

However, on my MacBook, Python + numpy beats Julia by miles.
Training with the same parameters, Python is more than twice as fast as Julia (4.4s vs 10.6s for one epoch). Considering that Julia is faster than Python (by ~2s) on my desktop, it seems like there's some resource that Python/numpy is utilizing on the mac that Julia isn't. Even parallelizing the code only gets me down to ~6.6s (although this might be due to me not being that experienced in writing parallel code). I thought the problem might be that Julia's BLAS was slower than the vecLib library used natively in mac, but experimenting with different builds didn't seem to get me much closer. I tried building both with USE_SYSTEM_BLAS = 1, and building with MKL, of which MKL gave the faster result (the times posted above).

I'll post my version info for the laptop as well as my Julia implementation below for reference. I don't have access to the desktop at this time, but I was running the same version of Julia on Windows, using openBLAS, comparing with a clean installation of Python 2.7 also using openBLAS.

Is there something I'm missing here?

EDIT: I know that my Julia code leaves a lot to be desired in terms of optimization, I really appreciate any tips to make it faster. However, this is not a case of Julia being slower on my laptop but rather Python being much faster. On my desktop, Python runs one epoch in ~13 seconds, on the laptop it only takes ~4.4s. What I'm interested in the most is where this difference comes from. I realize the question may be somewhat poorly formulated.

Versions on laptop:

julia> versioninfo()
Julia Version 0.6.2
Commit d386e40c17 (2017-12-13 18:08 UTC)
Platform Info:
  OS: macOS (x86_64-apple-darwin17.4.0)
  CPU: Intel(R) Core(TM) i5-7360U CPU @ 2.30GHz
  WORD_SIZE: 64
  BLAS: libmkl_rt
  LAPACK: libmkl_rt
  LIBM: libopenlibm
  LLVM: libLLVM-3.9.1 (ORCJIT, broadwell)

Python 2.7.14 (default, Mar 22 2018, 14:43:05) 
[GCC 4.2.1 Compatible Apple LLVM 9.0.0 (clang-900.0.39.2)] on darwin
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
>>> import numpy
>>> numpy.show_config()
lapack_opt_info:
    extra_link_args = ['-Wl,-framework', '-Wl,Accelerate']
    extra_compile_args = ['-msse3']
    define_macros = [('NO_ATLAS_INFO', 3), ('HAVE_CBLAS', None)]
openblas_lapack_info:
  NOT AVAILABLE
atlas_3_10_blas_threads_info:
  NOT AVAILABLE
atlas_threads_info:
  NOT AVAILABLE
openblas_clapack_info:
  NOT AVAILABLE
atlas_3_10_threads_info:
  NOT AVAILABLE
atlas_blas_info:
  NOT AVAILABLE
atlas_3_10_blas_info:
  NOT AVAILABLE
atlas_blas_threads_info:
  NOT AVAILABLE
openblas_info:
  NOT AVAILABLE
blas_mkl_info:
  NOT AVAILABLE
blas_opt_info:
    extra_link_args = ['-Wl,-framework', '-Wl,Accelerate']
    extra_compile_args = ['-msse3', '-I/System/Library/Frameworks/vecLib.framework/Headers']
    define_macros = [('NO_ATLAS_INFO', 3), ('HAVE_CBLAS', None)]
blis_info:
  NOT AVAILABLE
atlas_info:
  NOT AVAILABLE
atlas_3_10_info:
  NOT AVAILABLE
lapack_mkl_info:
  NOT AVAILABLE

Julia code (sequential):

using MLDatasets

mutable struct network
    num_layers::Int64
    sizearr::Array{Int64,1}
    biases::Array{Array{Float64,1},1}
    weights::Array{Array{Float64,2},1}
end

function network(sizes)
    num_layers = length(sizes)
    sizearr = sizes
    biases = [randn(y) for y in sizes[2:end]]
    weights = [randn(y, x) for (x, y) in zip(sizes[1:end-1], sizes[2:end])]

    network(num_layers, sizearr, biases, weights)
end

σ(z) = 1/(1+e^(-z))
σ_prime(z) = σ(z)*(1-σ(z))

function (net::network)(a)
    for (w, b) in zip(net.weights, net.biases)
        a = σ.(w*a + b)
    end
    return a
end

function SGDtrain(net::network, training_data, epochs, mini_batch_size, η, test_data=nothing)
    n_test = test_data != nothing ? length(test_data):nothing
    n = length(training_data)

    for j in 1:epochs
        training_data = shuffle(training_data)
        mini_batches = [training_data[k:k+mini_batch_size-1] for k in 1:mini_batch_size:n]

        @time for batch in mini_batches
            update_batch(net, batch, η)
        end

        if test_data != nothing
            println("Epoch ", j,": ", evaluate(net, test_data), "/", n_test)
        else
            println("Epoch ", j," complete.")
        end
    end
end

function update_batch(net::network, batch, η)
    ∇_b = net.biases .- net.biases
    ∇_w = net.weights .- net.weights

    for (x, y) in batch
        δ_∇_b, δ_∇_w = backprop(net, x, y)
        ∇_b += δ_∇_b
        ∇_w += δ_∇_w
    end

    net.biases -= (η/length(batch))∇_b
    net.weights -= (η/length(batch))∇_w
end

function backprop(net::network, x, y)
    ∇_b = copy(net.biases)
    ∇_w = copy(net.weights)

    len = length(net.sizearr)
    activation = x
    activations = Array{Array{Float64,1}}(len)
    activations[1] = x
    zs = copy(net.biases)

    for i in 1:len-1
        b = net.biases[i]; w = net.weights[i]
        z = w*activation .+ b
        zs[i] = z
        activation = σ.(z)
        activations[i+1] = activation[:]
    end

    δ = (activations[end] - y) .* σ_prime.(zs[end])
    ∇_b[end] = δ[:]
    ∇_w[end] = δ*activations[end-1]'

    for l in 1:net.num_layers-2
        z = zs[end-l]
        δ = net.weights[end-l+1]'δ .* σ_prime.(z)
        ∇_b[end-l] = δ[:]
        ∇_w[end-l] = δ*activations[end-l-1]'
    end
    return (∇_b, ∇_w)
end

function evaluate(net::network, test_data)
    test_results = [(findmax(net(x))[2] - 1, y) for (x, y) in test_data]
    return sum(Int(x == y) for (x, y) in test_results)
end

function loaddata(rng = 1:50000)
    train_x, train_y = MNIST.traindata(Float64, Vector(rng))
    train_x = [train_x[:,:,x][:] for x in 1:size(train_x, 3)]
    train_y = [vectorize(x) for x in train_y]
    traindata = [(x, y) for (x, y) in zip(train_x, train_y)]

    test_x, test_y = MNIST.testdata(Float64)
    test_x = [test_x[:,:,x][:] for x in 1:size(test_x, 3)]
    testdata = [(x, y) for (x, y) in zip(test_x, test_y)]
    return traindata, testdata
end

function vectorize(n)
    ev = zeros(10,1)
    ev[n+1] = 1
    return ev
end

function main()
    net = network([784, 30, 10])
    traindata, testdata = loaddata()
    SGDtrain(net, traindata, 10, 10, 1.25, testdata)
end
  • The Julia code you wrote is very (purposely?) inefficient. Example: z = w*activation .+ b that kind of code is creating arrays when they aren't required. Why not just have a cache array to make this non-allocating? Then your arrays of arrays should be StaticVectors of arrays (that's a small difference). Also, are you timing with @btime or including Julia's startup + JIT time? If you're using a main function and calling it from the command line, likely half of the time is just booting up Julia+LLVM and not actually running your script. This is not a recommended way to run Julia. – Chris Rackauckas Apr 8 '18 at 15:19
  • I based my Julia code on the python implementation linked, and I realize this obviously won't produce very efficient code. I am still fairly new to Julia and would appreciate any optimization tips. That being said, even this inefficient code is faster than the python implementation on my desktop, but not on my laptop and I'd like to find out why. As you can see in the code above, I time each epoch with @time inside the SGDtrain function, which I thought would bypass the startup time – Anders Apr 8 '18 at 16:11
  • I see, timing the epochs. Yes, that will work just fine. I think the difference would be the interaction with the GC. Both Python and Julia are going to spend a lot of time inside of MKL kernels for this if all else is optimized. On your laptop you're probably having a bad interaction with the GC due to the temporaries. A quick optimization would be to at least get rid of the temporaries in the BLAS1 calls. For example, a .= σ.(w*a .+ b) instead of a = σ.(w*a + b). Also activation .= σ.(z) and then activations[i+1] .= activation. Remember, slicing without a view produces a copy. – Chris Rackauckas Apr 8 '18 at 16:23
32

I started by running your code:

7.110379 seconds (1.37 M allocations: 20.570 GiB, 19.81%gc time)
Epoch 1: 7960/10000
6.147297 seconds (1.27 M allocations: 20.566 GiB, 18.33%gc time)

Ouch, 21GiB allocated per epoch? That's your issue. It's hitting garbage collection a lot, and the less memory your computer has the more it will have to. So let's tackle that.

The main idea is to pre-allocate your buffers and then modify arrays instead of creating new ones. In your code, you start backprop with:

∇_b = copy(net.biases)
∇_w = copy(net.weights)

len = length(net.sizearr)
activation = x
activations = Array{Array{Float64,1}}(len)
activations[1] = x
zs = copy(net.biases)

The fact that you're using copy means that you should probably be pre-allocating things! So let's start with zs and activations. I expanded your network to hold those cache arrays:

mutable struct network
    num_layers::Int64
    sizearr::Array{Int64,1}
    biases::Array{Array{Float64,1},1}
    weights::Array{Array{Float64,2},1}
    zs::Array{Array{Float64,1},1}
    activations::Array{Array{Float64,1},1}
end

function network(sizes)
    num_layers = length(sizes)
    sizearr = sizes
    biases = [randn(y) for y in sizes[2:end]]
    weights = [randn(y, x) for (x, y) in zip(sizes[1:end-1], sizes[2:end])]
    zs = [randn(y) for y in sizes[2:end]]
    activations = [randn(y) for y in sizes[1:end]]
    network(num_layers, sizearr, biases, weights, zs, activations)
end

Then I changed your backprop to use those caches:

function backprop(net::network, x, y)
    ∇_b = copy(net.biases)
    ∇_w = copy(net.weights)

    len = length(net.sizearr)
    activations = net.activations
    activations[1] .= x
    zs = net.zs

    for i in 1:len-1
        b = net.biases[i]; w = net.weights[i];
        z = zs[i]; activation = activations[i+1]
        z .= w*activations[i] .+ b
        activation .= σ.(z)
    end

    δ = (activations[end] - y) .* σ_prime.(zs[end])
    ∇_b[end] = δ[:]
    ∇_w[end] = δ*activations[end-1]'

    for l in 1:net.num_layers-2
        z = zs[end-l]
        δ = net.weights[end-l+1]'δ .* σ_prime.(z)
        ∇_b[end-l] = δ[:]
        ∇_w[end-l] = δ*activations[end-l-1]'
    end
    return (∇_b, ∇_w)
end

This led to a substantial decrease in the memory allocated. But there's still a lot to do. First let's change a * to an A_mul_B!. This function is a matrix multiplication which writes into an array C (A_mul_B!(C,A,B)) instead of creating a new matrix, and this can substantially decrease your memory allocations. So I did:

for l in 1:net.num_layers-2
    z = zs[end-l]
    δ = net.weights[end-l+1]'δ .* σ_prime.(z)
    ∇_b[end-l] .= vec(δ)
    atransp = activations[end-l-1]'
    A_mul_B!(∇_w[end-l],δ,atransp)
end

But instead of ' which allocates, instead I use reshape because I just want a view:

for l in 1:net.num_layers-2
    z = zs[end-l]
    δ = net.weights[end-l+1]'δ .* σ_prime.(z)
    ∇_b[end-l] .= vec(δ)
    atransp = reshape(activations[end-l-1],1,length(activations[end-l-1]))
    A_mul_B!(∇_w[end-l],δ,atransp)
end

(also it hits a faster OpenBLAS dispatch. That may be different with MKL though). But you're still copying with

    ∇_b = copy(net.biases)
    ∇_w = copy(net.weights)

and you're allocating a bunch of δs each step, so the next change I did pre-allocates those and does it all in place (it looks just like the previous changes).

Then I did some profiling. In Juno, this is just:

@profile main()
Juno.profiler()

or if you don't use Juno you can replace the second part with ProfileView.jl. I got:

enter image description here enter image description here

So most of the time is spent in BLAS but there's a problem. See that operations like ∇_w += δ_∇_w are creating a bunch of matrices! Instead we want to loop through and in-place update each matrix by its change matrix. This expands out to be like:

function update_batch(net::network, batch, η)
    ∇_b = net.∇_b
    ∇_w = net.∇_w

    for i in 1:length(∇_b)
      fill!(∇_b[i],0.0)
    end

    for i in 1:length(∇_w)
      fill!(∇_w[i],0.0)
    end

    for (x, y) in batch
        δ_∇_b, δ_∇_w = backprop(net, x, y)
        ∇_b .+= δ_∇_b
        for i in 1:length(∇_w)
          ∇_w[i] .+= δ_∇_w[i]
        end
    end

    for i in 1:length(∇_b)
      net.biases[i] .-= (η/length(batch)).*∇_b[i]
    end

    for i in 1:length(∇_w)
      net.weights[i] .-= (η/length(batch)).*∇_w[i]
    end
end

I did a few more changes along the same lines and my final code is the following:

mutable struct network
    num_layers::Int64
    sizearr::Array{Int64,1}
    biases::Array{Array{Float64,1},1}
    weights::Array{Array{Float64,2},1}
    weights_transp::Array{Array{Float64,2},1}
    zs::Array{Array{Float64,1},1}
    activations::Array{Array{Float64,1},1}
    ∇_b::Array{Array{Float64,1},1}
    ∇_w::Array{Array{Float64,2},1}
    δ_∇_b::Array{Array{Float64,1},1}
    δ_∇_w::Array{Array{Float64,2},1}
    δs::Array{Array{Float64,2},1}
end

function network(sizes)
    num_layers = length(sizes)
    sizearr = sizes
    biases = [randn(y) for y in sizes[2:end]]
    weights = [randn(y, x) for (x, y) in zip(sizes[1:end-1], sizes[2:end])]
    weights_transp = [randn(x, y) for (x, y) in zip(sizes[1:end-1], sizes[2:end])]
    zs = [randn(y) for y in sizes[2:end]]
    activations = [randn(y) for y in sizes[1:end]]
    ∇_b = [zeros(y) for y in sizes[2:end]]
    ∇_w = [zeros(y, x) for (x, y) in zip(sizes[1:end-1], sizes[2:end])]
    δ_∇_b = [zeros(y) for y in sizes[2:end]]
    δ_∇_w = [zeros(y, x) for (x, y) in zip(sizes[1:end-1], sizes[2:end])]
    δs = [zeros(y,1) for y in sizes[2:end]]
    network(num_layers, sizearr, biases, weights, weights_transp, zs, activations,∇_b,∇_w,δ_∇_b,δ_∇_w,δs)
end

function update_batch(net::network, batch, η)
    ∇_b = net.∇_b
    ∇_w = net.∇_w

    for i in 1:length(∇_b)
      ∇_b[i] .= 0.0
    end

    for i in 1:length(∇_w)
      ∇_w[i] .= 0.0
    end

    δ_∇_b = net.δ_∇_b
    δ_∇_w = net.δ_∇_w

    for (x, y) in batch
        backprop!(net, x, y)
        for i in 1:length(∇_b)
          ∇_b[i] .+= δ_∇_b[i]
        end
        for i in 1:length(∇_w)
          ∇_w[i] .+= δ_∇_w[i]
        end
    end

    for i in 1:length(∇_b)
      net.biases[i] .-= (η/length(batch)).*∇_b[i]
    end

    for i in 1:length(∇_w)
      net.weights[i] .-= (η/length(batch)).*∇_w[i]
    end
end

function backprop!(net::network, x, y)
    ∇_b = net.δ_∇_b
    ∇_w = net.δ_∇_w

    len = length(net.sizearr)
    activations = net.activations
    activations[1] .= x
    zs = net.zs
    δs = net.δs

    for i in 1:len-1
        b = net.biases[i]; w = net.weights[i];
        z = zs[i]; activation = activations[i+1]
        A_mul_B!(z,w,activations[i])
        z .+= b
        activation .= σ.(z)
    end

    δ = δs[end]
    δ .= (activations[end] .- y) .* σ_prime.(zs[end])
    ∇_b[end] .= vec(δ)
    atransp = reshape(activations[end-1],1,length(activations[end-1]))
    A_mul_B!(∇_w[end],δ,atransp)

    for l in 1:net.num_layers-2
        z = zs[end-l]
        transpose!(net.weights_transp[end-l+1],net.weights[end-l+1])
        A_mul_B!(δs[end-l],net.weights_transp[end-l+1],δ)
        δ = δs[end-l]
        δ .*= σ_prime.(z)
        ∇_b[end-l] .= vec(δ)
        atransp = reshape(activations[end-l-1],1,length(activations[end-l-1]))
        A_mul_B!(∇_w[end-l],δ,atransp)
    end
    return nothing
end

All else remains unchanged. To see that I am done, I added @time to the backpropcall and get:

0.000070 seconds (8 allocations: 352 bytes)
0.000066 seconds (8 allocations: 352 bytes)
0.000090 seconds (8 allocations: 352 bytes)

so that's non-allocating. I added @time to the for (x, y) in batch loop and get

0.000636 seconds (80 allocations: 3.438 KiB) 0.000610 seconds (80 allocations: 3.438 KiB) 0.000624 seconds (80 allocations: 3.438 KiB)

so that tells me that essentially all of the allocations left are coming from the iterator (this can be improved, but likely won't improve the timing). So the final timing is:

Epoch 2: 8428/10000
  4.005540 seconds (586.87 k allocations: 23.925 MiB)
Epoch 1: 8858/10000
  3.488674 seconds (414.49 k allocations: 17.082 MiB)
Epoch 2: 9104/10000

That's almost 2x faster on my machine, but the memory allocations are 1200x less per loop. This means that on machines where the RAM is slower and smaller, this method should do much much better (my desktop has quite a bit of memory so it really doesn't care too much!).

The final profiles show most of the time is in A_mul_B! calls and thus pretty much everything is limited by my OpenBLAS speed now, so I am done. Some extra things I can do are multithread some other loops, but giving the profiling the payoff will be small so I'll leave that to you (basically just put Threads.@threads on the loops like ∇_w[i] .+= δ_∇_w[i]).

Hopefully this not only improves your code, but teaches how to profile, pre-allocate, use in-place operations, and think about performance.

  • 4
    Thanks a lot! I didn't realize there was that much that could be improved. I was stuck in the thought that there was something else hindering my performance. I did notice that the gc was taking a lot of time, I just didn't know how to circumvent it, and figured it was probably about the same in Python. Thanks for taking the time to give such a detailed answer, it has really been a valuable lesson to me. – Anders Apr 9 '18 at 7:12
  • 1
    Chris, you should really expand that absolutely wonderful response into one of your blog articles! – Scott Jones Apr 12 '18 at 11:46
1

I have updated this example syntax to work with Julia 1.1 with some additional performance tweaks that resulted in 10x speed boost.

Source code here

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