I'm running a basic difference-in-differences regression model with year and county fixed effects with the following code:

xtreg ln_murder_rate i.treated##i.after_1980 i.year ln_deprivation ln_foreign_born young_population manufacturing low_skill_sector unemployment ln_median_income [weight = mean_population], fe cluster(fips) robust

i.treated is a dichotomous measure of whether or not a county received the treatment over the lifetime of the study and after_1980 measures the post period of the treatment. However, when I run this regression, the estimate for my treatment variable is omitted so I can't really interpret the results. Below is a screen shot of the output. Would love some guidance on what to check so that i can get an estimate for the treated variables prior to treatment.

xtreg ln_murder_rate i.treated##i.after_1980 i.year ln_deprivation ln_foreign_bo
> rn young_population manufacturing low_skill_sector unemployment ln_median_income
>  [weight = mean_population], fe cluster(fips) robust
(analytic weights assumed)
note: 1.treated omitted because of collinearity
note: 2000.year omitted because of collinearity

Fixed-effects (within) regression               Number of obs     =     15,221
Group variable: fips                            Number of groups  =      3,117

R-sq:                                           Obs per group:
     within  = 0.2269                                         min =          1
     between = 0.1093                                         avg =        4.9
     overall = 0.0649                                         max =          5

                                                F(12,3116)        =      89.46
corr(u_i, Xb)  = 0.0502                         Prob > F          =     0.0000

                                  (Std. Err. adjusted for 3,117 clusters in fips)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                |               Robust
 ln_murder_rate |      Coef.   Std. Err.      t    P>|t|     [95% Conf. Interval]
----------------+----------------------------------------------------------------
      1.treated |          0  (omitted)
   1.after_1980 |   .2012816   .1105839     1.82   0.069    -.0155431    .4181063
                |
        treated#|
     after_1980 |
           1 1  |   .0469658   .0857318     0.55   0.584    -.1211307    .2150622
                |
           year |
          1970  |   .4026329   .0610974     6.59   0.000     .2828376    .5224282
          1980  |   .6235034   .0839568     7.43   0.000     .4588872    .7881196
          1990  |   .4040176   .0525122     7.69   0.000     .3010555    .5069797
          2000  |          0  (omitted)
                |
 ln_deprivation |   .3500093    .119083     2.94   0.003     .1165202    .5834983
ln_foreign_born |   .0179036   .0616842     0.29   0.772    -.1030421    .1388494
young_populat~n |   .0030727   .0081619     0.38   0.707    -.0129306    .0190761
  manufacturing |  -.0242317   .0073166    -3.31   0.001    -.0385776   -.0098858
low_skill_sec~r |  -.0084896   .0088702    -0.96   0.339    -.0258816    .0089025
   unemployment |   .0335105    .027627     1.21   0.225    -.0206585    .0876796
ln_median_inc~e |  -.2423776   .1496396    -1.62   0.105    -.5357799    .0510246
          _cons |   2.751071    1.53976     1.79   0.074    -.2679753    5.770118
----------------+----------------------------------------------------------------
        sigma_u |  .71424066
        sigma_e |  .62213091
            rho |  .56859936   (fraction of variance due to u_i)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  • 1
    I dont use stata but it says 1.treated omitted because of collinearity so I'd first check whether 1.treated was highly correlated with any of your other predictors – Simon Apr 9 at 14:38
  • 1
    I see no programming question here. By all means ask on Statalist for help with understanding the output. Alternatively this might find a slow way to Cross Validated. As already commented; on the face of it, two variables say the same thing: if so, it's inevitable that one is omitted. – Nick Cox Apr 9 at 15:37

This is borderline off-topic since this is essentially a statistical question.

The variable treated is dropped because it is time-invariant and you are doing a fixed effects regression, which transforms the data by subtracting the average for each panel for each covariate and outcome. Treated observations all have treated set to one, so when you subtract the average of treated for each panel, which is also one, you get a zero. Similarly for control observations, except they all have treated set to zero. The result is that the treated column is all zeros and Stata drops it because otherwise the matrix is not invertible since there is no variation.

The parameter you care about is treated#after_1980, which is the DID effect and is reported in your output. The fact that treated is dropped is not concerning.

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