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I'm developing a progressive web app using Vue.js.

While I'm developing I use the command npm run dev to start the local server which serves the files on http://localhost:8080/. When I want to build for production I use npm run build prod which generates the output files in project\dist. I then take those files and copy them onto an ISS which is configured to work with single-page applications. All good so far.

I noticed some differences in the way the app looks (css) between the dev and prod build. First I thought this might be because of a client side cache, but after several tries to clean the cache and no-cache loading I'm sure that caching is not the issue here. The output really is different.

To be honest, I'm not sure if there is anything else different besides a few minor css parts. I was thinking what might be the issue, one of the things I noticed that could be the cause is that I use single file components in vue with scoped css (*.scoped.vue.css file names). I guess there could be an issue combining the different files into a single one?

It might be noted that I'm quite a newby when it comes to npm, webpack and all the other involved technologies. If you want to take a look at the configuration, you can find my current working branch build configurations here.

Any idea what the issue might be?

  • Did you find a solution for this problem? Having the same issue at the moment – Thomas van Broekhoven Feb 3 '19 at 15:17
  • @ThomasvanBroekhoven sadly no – Tobias Würth Feb 3 '19 at 15:26
  • @TobiasWürth Ok thanks. I did kind of solve it by giving the <template> an id and include that in scss. Also I applied an !important to a general style I was forced to override. It might not be the cleanest solution, but it solves the problems for now. – Thomas van Broekhoven Feb 3 '19 at 16:25
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I encountered the same problem when using single file components. The issue indeed seems to be that when you run npm run build it will generate one single css file without the guarantee that the styling will be applied in the same order, causing some property values to be ignored. I 'fixed' it by adding !important to the properties that weren't matching up in the final build. There's probably a better way to handle this, but I must admit I too am quite a newby.

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The order of how styles are applied while npm run build matters, and is to my knowledge out of (y)our control. To get rid of conflicts, when using Vue.js, you may want to scope your styles.

In every *.vue file within your project, replace

<style>
...
</style>

With

<style scoped>
...
</style> 
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  • The styles are already scoped, the filename ending *.scoped.vue.css implies that – Tobias Würth Nov 19 '18 at 11:18

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