3

I have the below utility method and I am using multiple if statements and getting cognitive complexity issue. I went through some links, but I am not able to understand how should I change my code without affecting users of this method.

public static boolean isWrapperValid(WrapperClass wrapper, boolean isTechnicalToken){

    String key=null;
    boolean isValidWrapper = false;

    if (wrapper != null && wrapper.length() > 7
        && wrapper.substring(0, 6).equalsIgnoreCase("XYZ"))
    {
        wrapper= wrapper.substring(7, wrapper.lastIndexOf('.')+1);
    }
    if(wrapper != null && wrapper.equalsIgnoreCase("TFR")) {
        isValidWrapper=Boolean.TRUE;
    }
    try {
         key = wrapper.getKey();
    }
    catch (Exception exception) {
        return isValidWrapper;
    }

    if(key!=null) {

        Date tokenExpiryTime = key.getExpiresAt();

        if(tokenExpiryTime!=null) {
            return isValidWrapper;
        }

        String algorithm=key.getAlgorithm();
        if(!DESIRED_ALGO.equals(algorithm)) {
            return isValidWrapper;
        }

        String value6=key.getType();
        if(!DESIRED_TYPE.equals(value6)) {
            return isValidWrapper;
        }


        if(key.getValue1()!=null && key.getValue2().size()>0 && key.getValue3()!=null && key.getValue4()!=null && key.getValue5()!=null) {
            isValidWrapper=Boolean.TRUE;
        }
    }

    return isValidWrapper;
}

Please share your suggestions to refactor this code.

  • (wrapper != null && wrapper.length() > 7 && wrapper.substring(0, 6).equalsIgnoreCase("XYZ")) == false. Unless "XYZ" is not actually "XYZ". – DodgyCodeException Apr 10 '18 at 12:41
  • This will never be true wrapper.substring(0, 6).equalsIgnoreCase("XYZ"). Because you create a substring which will be six characters long (wrapper.substring(0, 6)). Therefore it can never be equal to XYZ. – SubOptimal Apr 10 '18 at 13:06
  • 2
    @SubOptimal that's exactly what I was thinking when I wrote the comment above. Still, it might be possible, as we don't know exactly what WrapperClass is. It might be that WrapperClass.substring() doesn't do what we think it does! – DodgyCodeException Apr 10 '18 at 13:08
  • @DodgyCodeException Good point. Did not thought about it. – SubOptimal Apr 10 '18 at 13:10
  • @DodgyCodeException "XYZ " i had kept just not to show original values.. plz ignore those things – smruti ranjan Apr 11 '18 at 3:13
5

I don't think that merging many if conditions to one or simply do a code clean up, for example by changing the order of some instructions, can solve your problem.

Your code does not match the single responsibility principle. You should refactor this big method to smaller parts. Due to this it will testable, easier to maintain and read. I spent some time and did this:

public static boolean isWrapperValid(WrapperClass wrapper, boolean isTechnicalToken) {

    final WrapperClass unpackedWrapper = unpackWrapper(wrapper);
    boolean wrapperValid = isUnpackedWrapperValid(unpackedWrapper);

    Key key = null;
    try {
        key = unpackedWrapper.getKey();
    } catch (final Exception exception) {
        return wrapperValid;
    }

    if (key != null) {   
        if (doesKeyMeetsBasicConditions(key)) {
            return wrapperValid;
        }
        if (doesKeyMeetsValueConditions(key)) {
            return true;
        }
    }
    return wrapperValid;
}

protected static WrapperClass unpackWrapper(final WrapperClass wrapper) {      
    if (wrapper != null && wrapper.length() > 7 && wrapper.substring(0, 6).equalsIgnoreCase("XYZ")) {
        return wrapper.substring(7, wrapper.lastIndexOf('.') + 1);
    }
    return wrapper;
}

protected static boolean isUnpackedWrapperValid(final WrapperClass wrapper) {
   return wrapper != null && wrapper.equalsIgnoreCase("TFR");
}

protected static boolean doesKeyMeetsBasicConditions(final Key key) {
    Date tokenExpiryTime = key.getExpiresAt();
    if (tokenExpiryTime != null) {
        return true;
    }

    String algorithm = key.getAlgorithm();
    if (!DESIRED_ALGO.equals(algorithm)) {
        return true;
    }

    String value6 = key.getType();
    if (!DESIRED_TYPE.equals(value6)) {
        return true;
    }
    return false;
}

protected static boolean doesKeyMeetsValueConditions(final Key key) {
    return key.getValue1() != null && key.getValue2().size() > 0
           && key.getValue3() != null && key.getValue4() != null
           && key.getValue5() != null;
}

I don't know the domain logic, so some of my methods have stupid names etc. As you can see, now you have a lot of smaller methods with not many branches (if conditions) - easier to test (a static code is not nice, but you can mock it by using for example PowerMock).

  • Good point about the single responsibility principle. But note it doesn't just apply to methods, but to classes too. It seems like WrapperClass is some kind of monstrous cross between a String and a Map. But then maybe the OP has no access to that class and can't change it. – DodgyCodeException Apr 10 '18 at 21:17
  • 2
    Yes, I agree. My code is only an example for "how to start". It is hard to refactor something, when you don't know the domain and even the example code does not compile (it has been censored :P - String class does not have getExpiresAt method). – agabrys Apr 10 '18 at 21:23
  • Good catch! Maybe the OP's String is not java.lang.String but his own class with an import my.package.String; statement. – DodgyCodeException Apr 10 '18 at 21:28
  • @agabrys Thanks.. That was a really nice approach.. Once i get chance I will run sonar qube on this code and check if the issue is gone – smruti ranjan Apr 11 '18 at 3:27
1

A bit of rewriting delivered a simplification, that still could be improved upon.

public static boolean isWrapperValid(WrapperClass wrapper, boolean isTechnicalToken){
    if (wrapper != null && wrapper.length() > 7
        && wrapper.substring(0, 6).equalsIgnoreCase("XYZ"))
    {
        wrapper = wrapper.substring(7, wrapper.lastIndexOf('.')+1);
    }
    boolean isValidWrapper = wrapper != null && wrapper.equalsIgnoreCase("TFR");

    try {
        String key = wrapper.getKey();
        if (key != null && key.getExpiresAt() == null
                && DESIRED_ALGO.equals(key.getAlgorithm())
                && DESIRED_TYPE.equals(key.getType())
                && key.getValue1() != null && !key.getValue2().isEmpty()
                && key.getValue3() != null && key.getValue4() != null
                && key.getValue5() != null) {
            isValidWrapper = true;
        }
    }
    catch (Exception exception) {
        // DO NOTHING
    }
    return isValidWrapper;
}

After comment: here I catch any exception for all calls.

  • 1
    It's not entirely equivalent (but probably ok as it is). The original will throw an exception if any of the methods called after key = wrapper.getKey(); throw an exception. Your code will return normally. – DodgyCodeException Apr 10 '18 at 13:14
  • @DodgyCodeException you are right; should have added a remark. There being almost only getters and the weird isValidWrapper usage led my attention astray. – Joop Eggen Apr 10 '18 at 13:29
0

First of all, Sonar should give you more flags: reusing the wrapper parameter is usually a bad practice, NPE where invoking wrapper.getKey because wrapper can be null, but anyway, not the point...

Try reducing the number of if statements by creating local boolean variables (or possibly 1 big if statement if you have less than 5 or 6 tests, but often less readable). Once it's done, you should only have 1 block testing these boolean variables, and have one return statement, like the example above (not necessarily accurate!):

boolean expired = tokenExpiryTime != null;
boolean desiredAlgo = DESIRED_ALGO.equals(key.getAlgorithm());
boolean desiredType = DESIRED_TYPE.equals(value6);
if (expired || !desiredAlgo || !desiredType) {
    return isValidWrapper;
}

However, your Cognitive complexity level seems pretty low if this kind of algorithm triggers it...

Another big way to reduce an algorithm complexity is to turn sub-blocks of code (loops, if and try-catch) into private methods. In your example, it could be something like a checkWrapperValidity method, responsible for every test returning isValidWrapper

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.